white bookcase for girls room |girls bedroom wall color ideas 2017

A feature bed in a purple velvet, bone-inlay furniture, an eclectic mix of textiles and an all-important insouciantly hung sheer voile make up this bohemian scheme that has us dreaming of exotic, balmy summer nights.

The twin kids’ bedroom in this architect’s minimal family home is decorated in crisp white with fun splashes of bright colour. Elegant cushions make for a cosy corner on the right, while the kid’s workspace features a rustic wooden stool.

When decorating a tween girl’s room, don’t be afraid to pack it with pattern. Introduce different prints by layering patterns similar in color yet different in scale. An excellent rule of thumb is to stick with one large-, one medium- and one small-scale pattern. This will ensure the layered look appears balanced rather than busy.

Originally Rita’s room before the expansion of her London flat, the spare room has curtains in ‘Broadcloth’ felt from Hainsworth and is lined in Tyler Hall’s ‘First Bloom’ wallpaper from Tissus d’Hélène, with a Guatemalan tapestry that Phil brought back from his travels.

A good mattress is even more important than the bed it sits on. Take time to choose the right one for you, trying it out in-store if possible, and lying on it in various different positions. Whether you go for an innerspring mattress, memory foam mattress, or anything in between, it pays to invest in a well-made model. A top quality mattress should keep its shape for at least eight years. Check out our guide to the best mattresses.

for instance i hate how some of the beds are so boring and look so dull and quite frankly UNCOMFORTABLE.. they look like dog beds.. teens want a big fluffy bed thats extremely comfortable !! and looks it to!!!

ACCESSORIES Linen pillowcases (salmon), £48 each; linen duvet cover (stone), £297 for king-size; both from Larusi. Cushions, from top of pile: ‘Concrete Strip’, by Anna Glover, linen, 30 x 50cm, £115, and 40 x 60cm, £175, from Mint. ‘Leo’ (indigo), linen, £177.60 a metre, from Pierre Frey. Hand-dyed cotton throw, by Joanna Louca, £460, from Mint. Refurbished Fifties desk lamp, ‘1227’, by Anglepoise, £450, from Howe. Porcelain bowl (yellow), by Mud Australia, £95, at Designers Guild. Fabric (under plant stand), ‘Tuileries’ (crème), by Verel de Belval, linen/polyester, £238 a metre, from Abbott & Boyd. Resin bowl (on plant stand), ‘Black & Snow Swirl’, £225, from Dinosaur Designs. Earthenware jugs, ‘Indigo Storm’, by Faye Toogood for 1882, £29.95 each, from Holly’s House.

Ok so you may not have the cool exposed brick work and plumbing and the parquet floors, but if you’ve got the space then this tent bed combined with some characterful bedding is pretty much you all need to add the wow factor to a kid’s room. It even comes in a range of colours.

I love the calming and clean atmosphere this space has, which I think is really important for a child’s room. As a Mid Century design geek I love the simple wooden mobile hanging above the cot, the print of the wolf cub matches the earthy tones of the wood and cushion perfectly. I also love the idea of having photography of baby animals in a kid’s room, its just the right amount of cuteness whilst still feeling a little grown up. I’m a big fan of Middle eastern textiles and I really like the slight juxtaposition of the candy coloured persian rug and monochrome block printed throw. I chose this image as it has a great balance of mature style with cute elements and I think a room like this could be easily adapted as the child grows up. Image Credit

consider their room as more than just a sleeping space. As they begin exploring their independence, having a room where they can hang out, study and lounge with friends is almost more important to them than sleep. And the social aspect of a room is big. A survey of global teenagers by smartgirl.org found that the #1 thing a teen would add to their room is a poster of themselves with their friends. Work with your teen to creatively address the following areas in their room:

Create a simple canopy without a four-poster. Measure a piece of fabric to suspend over the length and width of the bed. Sew (or use fusible web) side panels along the corners of the fabric. Suspend over the corners of the bed with hooks screwed into the ceiling.

This is the guest bedroom at a client’s penthouse in the centre of Barcelona. I love the colour scheme and all the fabrics used. It feels like you’re on a holiday in a beautiful hotel when you’re in this bedroom. It has an en-suite with a double shower so that you can shower at the same time as your partner, I thought this would be romantic. The velvet, the suede, the silk, the divine fabrics and tones used in this bedroom are an entire world of calming, soothing, touchy feely goodness. It’s also a deluxe combination. To me It’s a winner. Image credit

Yes, even if your bedroom is small, you can still have a wow-inducing accent wall, as proven so strikingly here by Décor Gold Designs. Bold wallpaper has a place even in the tiniest of rooms. Just stick with one wall – preferably the one at the head of your bed – and keep the rest of the room sedate in terms of color and pattern.

hi i am a 13 year old girl and i would just like to say that although i found loads of gr8 rooms i think that the room sizes are a bit big considering that i and all of my friends have very small bed rooms.

Hi Gianna! So glad you found inspiration in this post! This a round up post, meaning we did not create the projects, but found them on the internet and put them all in one convenient place for our viewers!

The decoration of this bedroom by Hackett Holland is dramatic, yet still has an element of restraint. Beautifully proportioned, unfussy pieces don’t fight with the dark paint (‘Smoke Blue’ from Marston & Langinger), while pockets of colour are added by art and an Ikat lampshade.

Does your child have a favourite book or television character that you’re considering including in a design scheme? Bedding is the clever option as it doesn’t involve too much commitment (and we all now how fickle kids can be). We love the creative use of paint on the walls which works with the theme now but could also be adapted later.

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