girl hot images +interior designing games for girls

Take a leaf out of the Vidago Palace Hotel in Portugal’s book by mixing masculine (sleek, heavy furniture and dark colours) and feminine design elements (pastels, fresh flowers) for a beautifully balanced room that’s strong, yet oh-so chic.

I’m a 14 year old girl, and I am re-doing my small bedroom. None of these (with the exception of the first one) are realistic or what I’m looking for. I hate the unoriginality of the modern rooms and the pompous air in the others.

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I love the simplicity in design for this bedroom. It has ample amounts of floor to ceiling storage behind the bed, giving the rest of the lots of free space. Having the furniture and storage the same colour as the walls makes the room look bigger. Bedrooms should be clutter free as it helps us relax and de-stress, this room achieves a perfectly calm space! 

Create a simple canopy without a four-poster. Measure a piece of fabric to suspend over the length and width of the bed. Sew (or use fusible web) side panels along the corners of the fabric. Suspend over the corners of the bed with hooks screwed into the ceiling.

Did you scroll all this way to get facts about girls room decor? Well you’re in luck, because here they come. There are 169409 girls room decor for sale on Etsy, and they cost £37.00 on average. The most common girls room decor material is cotton. The most popular colour? You guessed it: pink.

I absolutely adore decorating my children’s bedrooms from their nursery start to their teenage finish, as each stage requires something different. We are in the school-boy phase at the moment with my son so we wanted to create a bedroom for him that showcased his personality as much as his age. We chose a daybed here with underneath drawer storage for his clothes and a pull out bed to turn it into a double bed, if he had a sleepover. I like to choose a theme that won’t over-power a room and one that can grow with him too. We went for a red and navy theme with a London twist. I like to keep the bedrooms neutral and when it’s time to change the theme you don’t also have to change the wallpaper and furniture too. Kids enjoy space to roam free so I don’t like it to be cluttered too much with more furniture. My son doesn’t have a dresser as we have plenty of space in these drawers under his bed and in his wardrobe. This leaves more space for his toys and room to play. I think the best thing to do is think of how you can make the space functional for your little one that screams his/her personality but in a way they can love it and grow with it over the years with minimal changes.

Add some sparkle to a princess-themed room with a starry wallpapered ceiling. This room’s blue ceiling, as well as small pops of powder blues, lavender, and bright coral, breaks up a mostly pink color scheme. Statement light fixtures above the bed give extra glamour that can carry into teenage years.

This girl’s room has a youthful palette wherein the different strokes of her dreams and aspirations would design her future. The room has a wonderful ceiling and the green walls give a fresh feel to the ambience. The night stand alongside the bed has got multipurpose usage. The pillows and rug look very smart.

In the main bedroom of this Chelsea family home designed by Turner Pocock, a hand-painted de Gournay silk wallpaper and an elegant chandelier sets the tone, but a pompom trim on the curtains, (‘Arrango Linen’ from Zinc Textile) adds a touch of playfulness and frivolity.

Your children are only young once so create a magical environment with furnishings and accessories that will kick start their imaginations. Curtained cubby hole bunkbeds are also a perfect way to give kids their own space.

The conversion of this Victorian terrace in west London was a collaborative effort between Thomas Croft Architects, John Cullen Lighting and designer Sarah Delaney. The brief for the kids’ rooms at the top of the house was to keep them light hearted and comfortable. Job done we’d say.

i like the rooms I just feel like a lot of them are girly when not all girls are all about the pink and lacy frill thing. i also looked at the boys rooms and i liked more of those than i did of these–but the one i really liked on this was the one with the ladder that led to this cool loft thing–it would need to be a different color but it was pretty cool ?

In this Paris flat, London-based designer Tara Craig has used a strong, simple palette with devastating effect. The walls of the spare bedroom are painted in ‘Papaver’ by Adam Bray for Papers and Paints, with an imposing ‘Carlyle’ headboard from Ensemblier London upholstered in ‘Serpetti’ linen by Martyn Lawrence Bullard.

Today’s teenagers are design-conscious and up to date on the latest trends. But they’re torn between childhood and adulthood. Most teens have beloved toys they’re not ready to give up, but look for a room that’s older and more sophisticated than their childhood room.

‘To make this room feel more relaxed, we decided to take the symmetry out of the space,’ says Tom Bartlett of Waldo Works, of his designs for London’s new Laslett Hotel. ‘It can be nice to break the rules. Things don’t always have to match: the lamp by Davide Groppi at TwentyTwentyone on the left above the fitted cabinet is different to the ‘Otis’ lamp Nocturne Workshop on the table by Pinch, but they are in the same materials and colours, so they work together. The same approach was used to hang the art, which I always try out first on the floor in front of the wall. One piece was hung and the rest were allowed to extend from it in different shapes up and across the wall. To do this well, you need a variety of frames and a good breadth of types of artwork,’ he says. Other items in the room include grey and blue patterned cushions by Eleanor Pritchard, an orange cushion by Urbanara and a blanket by Tweedmill.

i actually like the 13th one but my sister likes the 14th. im 14 and my sister is 19 and we have to sare our room!! we have different tastes. but its hard to get to different things when you dont have enough room for it or money for it!!

I love the calming and clean atmosphere this space has, which I think is really important for a child’s room. As a Mid Century design geek I love the simple wooden mobile hanging above the cot, the print of the wolf cub matches the earthy tones of the wood and cushion perfectly. I also love the idea of having photography of baby animals in a kid’s room, its just the right amount of cuteness whilst still feeling a little grown up. I’m a big fan of Middle eastern textiles and I really like the slight juxtaposition of the candy coloured persian rug and monochrome block printed throw. I chose this image as it has a great balance of mature style with cute elements and I think a room like this could be easily adapted as the child grows up. Image Credit

ahhh these room are huge!, thanks making them realistic, especially with all the sun lighting and windows, most of us id think atleast. have no lighting or a little lighting but have mopstly light bulb for lighting

I love the Scandi simplicity of this girl’s bedroom. Loft rooms are like a dream for most children – they are cosy, snug and a bit different. With this lovely white backdrop you can create a calm and uncluttered space – the mixture of white, pink and blue accessories make the room so modern. Current trends for girls’ bedrooms are veering away from the pink saturation approach of latter years, and moving towards something more creative and meaningful. You can decorate a room like this with slightly more nursery-like accessories to begin with and then up-style when your girl grows older. This can see your child through from baby, towards secondary school age – saving a fortune in decorating costs. On a final note, what’s not to love about the wonderful crepe lanterns and the cute lamb wall art?! Image Credit

This Oxfordshire cottage is a charming mix of old and new. Emma Burns of Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler worked with the existing features of each room to breathe new life into them. The bedroom’s orange velvet curtains (out of shot) were an original fixture, though Emma had them remade and hung from an antique pole to match the quilt (which she sourced from Colefax and Fowler Antiques). The wallpaper is ‘Alice’ by George Spencer, while Oka is a good match for the embroidered cushion covers.

It’s always so nice to refresh your space in little ways. You did such a good job. I love what you’ve done with the room in general. I’m actually obsessed with palette headboards my boyfriend is in the process of making us a smaller one, but repurposing it into a bed frame was a great idea. It looks awesome.

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Wow, interesting article. Maybe, this is of interest, I recently hired Furnishr to design my living room. I know, I could have designed my room by myself, but I actually liked the designs on their site. Pretty great service. They designed, delivered, and setup my new living room furniture and decor in less than a week. Check them out if you’re interested, http://www.furnishr.com/

With a characteristic respect for the fabric of this eighteenth-century house in Bath, designer Patrick Williams has carefully transformed it into a welcoming home and B&B. For Patrick, whose company Berdoulat specialises in the reinvention of period buildings, ‘the building itself is the most important client and should dictate what is done to it’. Such is his respect that he did not begrudge the request from the local conservation officer to preserve the original peg joints between the floor joists and beams, even though new steel sections would provide the structural support – a detail that, once covered by floorboards, nobody would see. He delights in the ‘hidden beauty’ of the building – details like the pie-crust-edged chimneypots that ‘can be seen only by Father Christmas’.

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