white bed for girl |hanging egg chair for girls bedroom

i really like this site to get ideas for my bedroom becuase i have just moved into my new house, but the only thing is, is the rooms on the website are really big and my room as not as big as the rooms on your website so it makes it hard for me to find a room that i love and that is approriate for my size of the room. i wish my bedroom was as big as these ones so i could do one of these designes. but it is unfortunatly isnt….

You are all totally missing the point of this. These are ideas for you, not things that you HAVE to do.So maybe you like the first or the second or the 24th. Maybe you don’t have the space or the money. What you could do is look for things in your room that are similar to the things in the picture. Secondly the reason the walls in some are bare are for a reason. The space on the wall if for you to hang your posters or pictures or just random stuff you like. Also if you notice how in some pictures the desk, bed, and entertainment area are like one huge piece. Perfect for small rooms. I am 13 and I am getting my room redone for my birthday and also looking for designs for my room. While I like some of these none are any I feel express myself so I won’t be choosing any designs similar to those in the pictures.

The naturally subdued color scheme of rustic style is perfect for a small space. Use weathered wood, an interesting ceiling fixture, and whimsical touches like the faux animal heads in this enviable room from Peace Design to give your bedroom lots of interest.

The chief attraction of this room is the custom made canopy bed. The bed skirt and the frilly pillowcase along with the little step-up stool give a traditional look to the bedroom. The color combination in pink and brown is quite offbeat and amazing. These are examples of classy girls bedroom ideas!

One of five upstairs bedrooms, this room marries comfort with style. The cowhide rug and black and white patterened chest of drawers keep the colour sceme minimal, but a spash a green on the dresser continues the home’s connection to country-side.

This bed in the bedroom of gilder Clare Mosley and husband Mark Bicknell was bought in Paris. Its journey hasn’t been smooth. During the eight months it took to make the house reasonably habitable, Clare and Mark camped in one room and the builders worked around them. However, even this safeguard did not protect them from a few of the traditional building disasters. Having gone away for two days, they returned to find that the bed had been cut up and thrown out of the window and into a waiting skip below. Thankfully, it was saved. It is now resplendent with matching quilt, half-tester and cushions in ‘Mikado L2804’ by Le Manach.

Heidi Lightfoot and Steve Gibbons own this modern, colourful Thirties house in rural Hertfordshire. Built in 1936 by the renowned public sector architect Mary Medd, Sewell’s Orchard was apparently unpopular with the locals at the time, who likened its monopitch roof and pared-back design to that of a canning factory. This is not a view shared by Heidi Lightfoot and Steve Gibbons, however, who have lived in and loved the daring modernist property for the past few years.

The main bedroom of Jo Vestey’s Oxfordshire farmhouse has Jo’s photographs on display and a Japanese light on the desk. Exposed beams, wooden floorboards and the desk contrast nicely with the white rug and walls, giving an overall look that is both clean and rustic.

The Argentinian architect Mario Cannio has created a play on stripes in his bedroom, with shades of olive green and red, and an indigo-dyed bed cover. The bedroom also has its own open fire and wooden blinds outside the windows to shade them in summer. A colourful oil painting hangs above the modern fireplace and below this sit a neat line of artists pigments.

Girls’ Purple Bedroom Decorating Ideas – Interior design – People interact and react to different colors in different ways as certain colors can give a certain and strong impression depending on their psychological

This bedroom would be stunning solely with the striking dark grey wall panel and monochrome bedding, but the addition of the rich ochre throw, writing desk, vintage chair and chic accessories adds an extra element that takes this stylish scheme to a whole new level.

A modern bedside table and monochromatic rug designed by Studio Ashby feature in the guest bedroom in a flat that has been transformed from a stark new-build to a characterful home. The pattern on the padded headboard is reflected in the artwork above the bed.

The main bedroom in Diane Nutting’s manor house in Wiltshire features a showstopping Colefax and Fowler chintz fabric from the 1970s, since discontinued. The sister-in-law of Diane’s first husband was Nancy Lancaster, the owner of the company.

Originally, Claire intended to do the decoration of the house herself. ‘Rather naively, I thought it would be enjoyable. To begin, I went to a Graham & Green warehouse sale somewhere on the A40. It was a complete bun fight and I felt totally overwhelmed. I came back with one armchair that now lives in the playroom and said to Dom, We are going to need help.’

For grown-ups a bedroom is a place of tranquillity and calm. But do young children have the same needs? A bedroom is their space – a chance to distill their rainbow coloured personality into a single (usually fairly small) room. And children come with a lot of stuff – which usually means they’re living in the aftermath of a tornado of toys. Organisation is key – it’s all about creating order from the chaos without becoming a control freak. Which is why I love bedrooms with clever, inventive storage. The trick is to balance your desire for organisation with plenty of bright, colourful, child-friendly fun. Beds with built-in storage, slim-line desks and bookshelves are all great ways to use every scrap of space as efficiently as possible. The clever furniture and pops of colour in this photo are neat enough to please the grown-ups whilst still being perfect for the kids. Image Credit

Hitting the books might be a chore, but in a room as fun as this, homework time just might get a little easier. A large desk and office chair, with storage bins beneath, create a work zone. But when it’s time for fun, ample seating, a fun color scheme, and whimsical touches turn this room into a space for giggling with friends.

There can be few House & Garden readers who are unfamiliar with the cult names and sought-after colours of the Farrow & Ball paint chart. Friends and business partners Martin Ephson and Tom Helme, the men responsible for planting it firmly in the nation’s consciousness, sold the company in 2006, and have since launched textiles company Fermoie. House & Garden decoration editor Gabby Deeming created a pretty scheme using their fabrics. The padded headboard, upholstered in the ‘Rabanna’ cotton is from Fafio, while the sofa and chair are both from Howe.

Young parents often ask the following question to a child psychologist: how to instill in a child a love of reading? Of course, we are not experts on parenting, but we can give our answer to the question: a children’s library should be in each kids room. After all, a fairy tale for a child begins even before he opens the book. We offer the seven useful interior solutions. Tips for Creating Library for Children

Curtains from Vaughan and vintage bedlinen introduce Colour іп a Sраге гoom of a newbuild country house. Mixing classical symmetry and vernacular charm, this newbuild country house is a triumph of teamwork, with architects and designers collaborating to create the owners perfect home.

The decoration of this bedroom by Hackett Holland is dramatic, yet still has an element of restraint. Beautifully proportioned, unfussy pieces don’t fight with the dark paint (‘Smoke Blue’ from Marston & Langinger), while pockets of colour are added by art and an Ikat lampshade.

WALLS Forged-iron curtain pole (matt black), 20mm diameter, £17 a metre, from Jim Lawrence; with hinged-metal corner joint (black nickel), £7, from Poles & Blinds. Curtains, ‘Luovi’ (blue), linen, £39 a metre, from Marimekko.

This bedroom in the Tudor wing of Bradwell Lodge – the perfect neoclassical country house in miniature – is decorated with ‘Regent’ wallpaper and matching blinds from Bernard Thorp. The scheme may be sweet and soothing but the room is allegedly haunted.

This cottage bedroom at ‘Driftwood’  in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand was a shoot location for Laura Thomas Linens ‘Organic Bed Linen Collection’.  A space where time became irrelevant and the busy technological world we live in could be placed on hold.  The coastal style was uncluttered and the use of straw roller blinds and natural light created an atmosphere of wilderness and calm.  The incredible view could be enjoyed from the comfort of the bed.  A perfect paradise to wake up to! Image credit

One of the most popular color schemes for a preteen girl’s bedroom is pink, white, and black. Take one look at the room shown here and you’ll see why: it’s the perfect blend of sophistication, innocence, and quirkiness. Stick with black and white on the flooring and the furniture, and you can easily change the theme if your daughter eventually decides she’s too old for pink.  

This quiet and comfortable reading spot lies in one of the spare bedrooms of this perfect country house, decorated by interior designer Veere Grenney. The owners recognise how lucky they were to find such a large home in such pristine condition and squandered no time in filling it with the possessions they love, like this floral, low back armchair and geometric rug in complementary shades of green.

Children’s bedrooms should be fun, bold and playful. As a designer, I love to let my imagination run wild when working with children’s bedrooms. With a little inventiveness you can create the most wonderful spaces with unusual paint effects and bespoke joinery. Use MDF to create a built in bed in the shape of a house or teepee, section off a corner for a reading area in the shape of a castle or make the most of a tall ceiling with a mezzanine, as in the image above. Children love to have their own special space and creating a reading nook or hiding space allows them to escape into their own magical world. In the past I have designed rooms with tented ceilings, trampoline floors and a bed made from silver birch branches decorated with fairy lights. Go on – have some fun! Image Credit

‘The basement is the real triumph of the house – it doesn’t feel subterranean,’ says Claire Spencer-Churchill, who shares the house with her husband Dominic and their two children Martha, four, and Ivor, two.

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