furniture for bedrooms teenagers girl simple

When it comes to storage (especially in a small space) the more the merrier. Choose beds and nightstands that can all do double duty. Top it all off with a witty, decorative touch – in this case, a print out of a favourite poem affixed to the wall with washi tape and framed.

This bedroom in Soho Farmhouse features wood panelling. Mixing bare wood with white painted panels gives the room texture as well as a rustic feel. The pale scheme includes framed prints and large rugs.

Maximising light and space was essential to show the owner’s post-war art and sleek French art deco furniture to their best advantage in this elegant Pimlico flat. In the bedroom nineteenth-century photographs bought from Portobello Market hang above the bed, while built in bookshelves flank the windows.

A bedroom always reflects the personality of the occupant. The things that describe your personality the most is the wall colours, the bedroom suit and the decoration. ‘One’s own bedroom’ is the favourite corner of the room during the growing years.

Want to add some colour to your space? Don’t have the budget for a full makeover? A rug, a nightstand and some fresh flowers can transform a space from neutral to technicolour like that *snaps fingers*.

As much as possible, owner Anne-Marie tried to match the wall colours to those that her grandmother had used, keeping the bedrooms the same subtle colours, but adding ‘ribbons’ of colour to outline the architecture and ‘dress the room’.

A cozy, pillow-lined window seat is the perfect spot for a teen girl to write, read or imagine. This sweet seat is flanked by pretty white and gold sconces for easy-access reading light and a small side table to hold drinks and snacks. It also doubles as chic built-in storage!

Curtains from Vaughan and vintage bedlinen introduce Colour іп a Sраге гoom of a newbuild country house. Mixing classical symmetry and vernacular charm, this newbuild country house is a triumph of teamwork, with architects and designers collaborating to create the owners perfect home.

Multipurposing will help a tween get much more use out of her room. To create a tween-height gathering area, consider using a coffee table in the center of the bedroom. Once guests come over, the low stature of the coffee table makes it the perfect spot to pull up a pillow and snack while playing games or reading books.

Grove Lodge, the Cambridge home of Tim Knox, director of The Fitzwilliam Museum, and landscape designer Todd Longstaffe-Gowan, provides the perfect setting for the couples growing collection of artwork and curiosities. In the spare bedroom a gallery wall of antique has been coupled with a brass bed-frame and gingham bedspread.

We love that there are so many things that catch the eye in this room, from pirate ships and bunting to hot air ballons, fun prints, a stuffed octopus and paisley cushions. It’s just what’s needed to spark a child’s imagination.

This cosy bedroom at Soho Farmhouse features green floral wallpaper, creating a countryside feel. Matching curtains form a cosy canopy around the four-poster bed. This design is ideal for a small space.

If you’re afraid of mixing pattern, start with stripes. A variety of sizes in the same colour adds interest, yet fits with the calm atmosphere of a bedroom. Designer Paolo Moschino chose a nautical colour scheme of blue and white for this fisherman’s cottage in Cornwall.

If space is at a premium in your little one’s room, try pushing the bed against a wall. With the bed out of the way, she’ll have plenty of play space on the floor—which will also prevent toys from cluttering up your living spaces. An upholstered queen-size headboard along the bedside creates the look of a daybed and keeps kids safe from rolling between the bed and the wall while they sleep.

In this London house designed by Suzy Hoodless, the children’s rooms were kept graphic and simple; Suzy hates ‘cute’ decoration that they will quickly grow out of – she has used a Børge Mogensen cabinet as a changing table in her own home. So the only concession she made to the children’s ages was bright primary colour. In one of the rooms a custom-designed mural has been painted on the wardrobe door.

Before settling on any small bedroom ideas, it’s vital to get out the measuring tape beforehand and work out what size of bed you can comfortably accommodate, while leaving yourself enough floor space to walk around in. Magnolia colours, pale furnishings, mirrors and framed photographs of landscapes can help create the optical illusion that the room is bigger and more spacious. Look for multi-purpose pieces of furniture that hide away clutter in a neat and inventive manner—these can add a flavour of fun and sharp, cutting-edge design to a small room.

We’d take silver over gold any day if it meant getting this sweet nursery. The soft colour is so serene but impactful design ideas like the ceiling stripes, navy wall and wall stickers give it real personality.

One Reply to “furniture for bedrooms teenagers girl simple”

  1. For grown-ups a bedroom is a place of tranquillity and calm. But do young children have the same needs? A bedroom is their space – a chance to distill their rainbow coloured personality into a single (usually fairly small) room. And children come with a lot of stuff – which usually means they’re living in the aftermath of a tornado of toys. Organisation is key – it’s all about creating order from the chaos without becoming a control freak. Which is why I love bedrooms with clever, inventive storage. The trick is to balance your desire for organisation with plenty of bright, colourful, child-friendly fun. Beds with built-in storage, slim-line desks and bookshelves are all great ways to use every scrap of space as efficiently as possible. The clever furniture and pops of colour in this photo are neat enough to please the grown-ups whilst still being perfect for the kids. Image Credit
    ‘We loved the cool, pared-down style of a house belonging to a Swedish art collector, which we had seen in a magazine,’ say the owners of this west-London terrace home. Enter Hugh Leslie whose unmistakable style gradually evolved the house into a smart family home. At the front of the house on the first floor is the pretty, generously proportioned main bedroom. Its walls are lined with the same buff-pink linen (‘Prelle Toile Barbare’ fabric by Alton Brooke) as the pelmets and the curtains, which adds an extra touch of glamour to the room. Behind it is the en-suite bathroom, with simple panelling, hand-built units and a walk-in shower lined in teak, which feels a bit like entering a first-class compartment on a vintage train.
    Measuring just 90 square metres, this home to a family of five in Chelsea, London, makes use of every inch of space. Designed by Eve Mercier, the small kids’ bedroom features two broad, wall-mounted benches (underneath the loft bed) that are easily transformed into beds (bedlinen is concealed below), while a third, drawer bed slides out when needed. ‘We wanted a versatile space that could easily be converted into a study if necessary,’ explains Eve. A circular, frosted window overlooks the bathroom.
    The pink and cream in this room is a little girl’s dream. But the sophisticated armoire and chandelier mean that it will suit her for years to come, and can be easily updated by changing the bedding and accessories.

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