black white and red decorating ideas for bedrooms |mirrors tumblr

For Emma Bridgewater and her husband Matthew Rice, a shared desire to preserve skills and traditions has influenced their booming ceramics business, as well as the restoration of their farmhouse and barn in Oxfordshire. As seen here, the bedroom retains the original stonework.

Love the photos, really gave me some ideas on decorating my next flat. The bedroom in the new property is quite small but the walls are painted in a cream colour – will be easy to pick the right elements to decorate it. Since I’m a tenant, I’ll have to find non-destructive ways of decorating the place. I will also have to think how I’ll remove and clean the place when my tenancy comes to an end, but this isn’t a problem since London is full of shops and I have plenty of things to choose from.

These rooms are awesome! Really love the graffiti wall and blackboard wall; I think feature walls really make a room stand out. I have found some brilliant teen bedroom ideas recently, a great range to suit all budgets.

The owner of this family home in Chelsea has a collection of Fifties, Norwegian abstract-expressionist art; instead basing his scheme around the colours in the paintings, designer Stephen Eicker cleverly mirrored the rich shades with layers of vibrant fabrics and thickly applied paints instead. The vibrant fabric used as wallcovering in the spare room is by Claremont.

The Pink Room in Bradwell Lodge is fun, feminine and fancy. A bold Bernard Thorp fabric, ‘Brimble’, has been used on the walls and bed, and for the blind: this creates a lovely sense of continuity in the space.

I wanted this nursery to be a tranquil yet timeless space. The combination of subtle greys, soft pinks and white furniture is timeless and effortlessly stylish and ensures longevity. Taking inspiration from the vintage wallpaper tree art, I have accented this with brighter pinks and lime greens to punctuate the scheme and add freshness. The cotton curtains, have a playful embroidered band across the bottom featuring cats and birds, adding interest and fun to the scheme and contrasting well with the brighter pink linen blind. There is a useful mix of both open and closed storage. Contemporary pieces (such as the bunny nightlight and the grey acrylic storage stool) are mixed with vintage finds (including the wallpaper used for the tree and the antique children’s books) to create a unique room and one that complements the rest of the home. A sweet sanctuary.

Designer Guy Goodfellow has made the window a feature in this manor-house bedroom in Devon. Its casement is painted in Rose of Jericho’s ‘Mountain Green’, framed by thick linen curtains and with a smart seat underneath. The ceiling is painted with floral motifs, giving the appearance of pargeting. To replicate these murals, try the painter Dawn Reader.

The striking bed may be a traditional style in a country-inspired cabbages and rabbits print but when given some neon pink bed sheets and placed in front of a feature walll of colourful frameless picture frames, the look is modern and whimsical.

This bedroom resides in a period home with high ceilings, classically inspired mouldings and beautiful parquet flooring. As if that isn’t enough, it’s filled with a mixture of mid-century furniture and lighting, breathtaking art and a sophisticated and restrained colour palette. For me it is the embodiment of ‘timelessness’. It will look as good in ten or twenty years time, just as it wouldn’t have looked out of place thirty years ago. It’s also impossible to tell if the owner is male of female. Another sign of simple good taste. And yet, it’s no museum piece, and has all the attributes of a comfortable and restorative bedroom. The pillows are plump and smooth. There’s an extra wool blanket to ward off winter chills. There’s a warm rug for bare feet, and the reading lights are positioned just where they are most effective. There’s even candles handy for when the mood dictates. If I was to add anything, it might be a padded headboard, but then the artwork wouldn’t be centre stage. That’s another word for this room. Considered. Image credit

The main bedroom of Ben Pentreath’s Georgian country house is painted in what he lovingly refers to as ‘freshly laid cowpat’ – an earthy green from Papers & Paints, officially known as ‘4-050’. The bed is covered with a fresh Indian printed-cotton cover.

‘I wanted the house to be comfortable above all, and for me colour is very much part of that,’ says Jacquie Rufus-Isaacs of her eighteenth-century farmhouse in the Cotswolds. With the help of her friend, decorator Scott Maddux, she has enhanced the house with a slightly unusual palette, which is no surprise as Jacquie’s real love is painting. She has a studio in a converted farm building where she works on her vibrant, expressive still lifes. Furnishings are equally various and include a sofa is upholstered in a Lelièvre stripe in the main bedroom, inherited antiques, junk-shop finds and a selection of paintings. These range from eighteenth-century landscapes to works by living artists including Barbara Stuart and Ken Howard. Jacquie’s eye ensures a harmonious composition.

A bed with a half-tester canopy made by J Gee Blinds takes centre stage in the main bedroom of a London flat designed by Charlotte Crosland, accessorised with a fleur-de-lis cover by Neisha Crosland and cushions that mirror the floral motifs on the decorative wall.

I have seen this image come up on my Pinterest feed a few times in the past and have always thought I would love to be lying in that bed reading a good book! I love the contrast of black and white and think it’s a clever decision to have the fur on the end of the bed so it warms up the rest of the scheme. The artwork is oversized but not overpowering and I am always drawn to a simple colour palette- in this case it’s black, white and brown with a touch of gold. It’s simple, elegant and beautiful.  Image credit

Resisting the idea of moving or expanding into the basement, the owners of this London house from the 1850s gave architect Maria Speake of Retrouvius the go-ahead to make structural changes to give their family and business the space needed. This children’s bedrooms is flooded with light from both the window and skylight, with neat underbed storage to make the most of the awkward attic space.

Sugar and spice and all things nice, that’s what little girls are made of… So a cacophony of florals, butterflies and birds really works. Particularly when more traditional prints, like the wallpaper here, are combined with more modern ones.

The bed frame is antique, but for similar try the ‘Somerset’ at Laura Ashley. A French, nineteenth-century ash chest of drawers from Colefax and Fowler Antiques complements the iron and glass chandelier. For similar try the ‘Chantal’ at Graham & Green. The raffia wall shade on the back wall is from the The Conran Shop.

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