themes for rooms in your house |purple teal white shared bedroom for girls

Four-poster beds with pale pink bedding and ‘Mistletoe’ muslin create the perfect country bedroom. Being well-versed in decorating country homes, Fiona Shelburne knew she wanted to turn this Hampshire house into a family-orientated home. She used an English country-house style with a contemporary twist to create a cosy family space. The twin four-poster beds follow this traditional style while adding height to the room. The ‘Mistletoe’ muslin from Simon Playle adds light and playfulness to the space; the curtains are in ‘Delphos Aqua’ from Jane Churchill.

The comfortable guest bedroom features a moss green headboard, with Victorian style cushions and bedspread. Their brief to Gavin Houghton was to make the house traditional and cosy, featuring the best of classic English interior decoration.

Originally Rita’s room before the expansion of her London flat, the spare room has curtains in ‘Broadcloth’ felt from Hainsworth and is lined in Tyler Hall’s ‘First Bloom’ wallpaper from Tissus d’Hélène, with a Guatemalan tapestry that Phil brought back from his travels.

The most popular themes for young girls are princesses and fairies. Boys like the sea and cars. But if you think it’s trite, discover another interesting trend decor, inspired by the amazing world of Africa. How to decorate jungle style kids’room

If you’re considering florals but don’t want an overly feminine scheme, here’s your inspiration: a fresh print combined with contemporary accessories in strong yellow and green hues. The base of whites and greys keeps it sophisticated too.

How about a minimalist bedroom that will wish you sweet dreams? A bedroom that pleases your senses after a long and busy day. A space that is a balm for the soul of its residents, which creates a sense of sanctuary amid the hustle and bustle of everyday life. A Zen space with a subtle extravagant touch in the form of a marble wall which acts as a blank canvas for other features. A focal point in a form of a cosy bed upholstered with a nice, soft fabric enriched with two asymmetric lamps giving the space an usual and interesting look. There is a large walk-in wardrobe, to the right of the bed, allowing residents to keep the space nice and tidy – perhaps apart from a couple of great books laying around here and there. But who wouldn’t love to lay down on this bed with a good read? Image credit

ACCESSORIES Linen pillowcases (salmon), £48 each; linen duvet cover (stone), £297 for king-size; both from Larusi. Cushions, from top of pile: ‘Concrete Strip’, by Anna Glover, linen, 30 x 50cm, £115, and 40 x 60cm, £175, from Mint. ‘Leo’ (indigo), linen, £177.60 a metre, from Pierre Frey. Hand-dyed cotton throw, by Joanna Louca, £460, from Mint. Refurbished Fifties desk lamp, ‘1227’, by Anglepoise, £450, from Howe. Porcelain bowl (yellow), by Mud Australia, £95, at Designers Guild. Fabric (under plant stand), ‘Tuileries’ (crème), by Verel de Belval, linen/polyester, £238 a metre, from Abbott & Boyd. Resin bowl (on plant stand), ‘Black & Snow Swirl’, £225, from Dinosaur Designs. Earthenware jugs, ‘Indigo Storm’, by Faye Toogood for 1882, £29.95 each, from Holly’s House.

WALLS ‘Messel’, £42 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Mylands. FURNITURE ‘French Modernist’ steel daybed, by Raphaël, £11,000, from Rose Uniacke. ‘Trio’ brass and walnut side table, by Neri & Hu for De La Espada, £1,104, from Heal’s. ACCESSORIES Mattress cover in ‘Grandvilliers’ (olive), by Nicole Fabre Designs, cotton/linen, £69 a metre, from Tissus d’Hélène. ‘Ticking Stripe’ cotton pillowcase (ecru/light grey), £19, from Toast. Bolster in ‘Iznik Vine’ (brown/black), by Martyn Lawrence Bullard, linen, £226 a metre, from Tissus d’Hélène. Eiderdowns in, from top: ‘Coral’ (chestnut), cotton, £58 a metre, from Soane; ‘Paola’ (gold), by Brigitte Singh, cotton, £58 a metre, from Aleta. Porcelain ‘Water Jug’ used as vase (steel), £106, from Mud Australia.

Welcome to our decorating page, where you can spice up designs, and decors. You are about to learn how to become a fabulous decorator of all things girly. If you are the type of girl who enjoys designing, and remodeling things then we got quite a few decorating games you will love! Feel free to decorate homes, cakes, and change the decor, and paintings in all our excellent design, and decor games. Decorating a home or a room can be an amazing experience. By decorating rooms the way you want you get a chance to let your personality shine. Try different types of decor by using lots of textures and colors. Make a room pop by changing the type of wall paper or by putting a eye catching piece of furniture against the wall. Remodeling a home can be lots of fun and getting a chance to paint the walls the way you want and doing the interior design the way you’ve envisioned it can be a wonderful experience. Transform the feel of a home by using warm colors and a unique interior design. Go wild with colors and textures or stay simple and sweet by using a neutral tones and warm lights. Decorate things the way you want and change anything you wish with once click of a button in your virtual home.

Floor-to-ceiling windows ensure this child’s bedroom in Gytha Nuttall’s south London home is flooded with natural light. The internal windows also emphasises a feeling of height, which is much-needed here – the structure of an office space in a former schoolhouse was adapted to create this ‘flat within a flat’.

Soft coral and brown? It may be out of imagination, but it turns out so beautiful and girly. Love the patterned wall art above the bed, the black and white lampshade, the “DREAM” decorative letters on the side storage dresser…Who doesn’t want a bedroom like this as a teenage girl? via House of Rose Blog.

The main bedroom of Jo Vestey’s Oxfordshire farmhouse has Jo’s photographs on display and a Japanese light on the desk. Exposed beams, wooden floorboards and the desk contrast nicely with the white rug and walls, giving an overall look that is both clean and rustic.

In the Beverly Hills bedroom of designer Joe Nye, Claremont’s George Spencer ‘Palm Stripe’ wallpaper has been paired with a headboard covered in a dhurrie rug, and bedding from William-Sonoma Home; the red throw is from the Harnaz Cashmere collection.

Most of these rooms are okay, but none of them gave me any idea wse on how to redecorate my room. First of all, every single one f these rooms are way bigger then mine. Second of all, who has that kind of money to buy all that expencive looking furnishing?

‘The key with toys is to design somewhere for them to go,’ says interior designer Bunny Turner of Turner Pocock. The green ottoman at the foot of the bed in this room doubles as fancy dress storage and a vault for gymnastics.

I adore white painted walls and then really experimenting with pattern and colour in the soft furnishings and bedroom accessories. Floral patterns are always a favourite of mine for a feminine look and the brighter the colours the better. The informal group of pretty postcards fixed with washi tape is super cute and I like being able to easily change the display to suit my mood and the season. The look is a little bit granny chic so suits my love of hunting for eclectic items in charity shops. Even on a dull day this bedroom would cheer me up. Image credit

The bedroom is a place when you should be able to relax, rest and sleep well. The space therefore should be simple, clean and uncluttered. Ban all the unnecessary items and focus on the essentials – comfy pillows, soft bedding, good light for reading, and small bedside table to keep your books and water carafe. Create a space where you can rest your eyes and calm your mind, and it means white walls and no busy patterns. I am drawn to this bedroom because of the colour palette – all in soft brown tones. There is a feeling of calm and the crumpled linen looks very inviting. The only decoration it needs is a single artwork on the wall. The beauty here is in simplicity. Image credit

I all honesty, I don’t see how this is supposed to help make the most out of a small room. First of all, they just look like normal bedrooms. And anyay, I guess it’s not what I googled for. The reason I was looking for a post on how to maximize on small room space is because right now my bedroom is also my living room is also my office. I live in NY and I am SURE I am not the only person with this sort of living arrangement. Real estate costs. And quite frankly we are paying for every cubic inch of space in a room here in the city, meaning loft beds and over head storage and really anything and everything to maximize on space and provide order to a multi-purpose room. I don’t need to make my small space LOOK bigger. For what? I need it to feel functionally bigger, since I can’t actually have it bigger.

For a girly look, choose heart bedding and pretty curtains to match. A pink table lamp continues the theme, while furniture in a light-coloured wood is more subtle and won?t overpower the girly furnishings and colour scheme.

The neat attic bedroom of designer Hugh Leslie’s Chelsea studio is partially clad in horizontal tongue-and-groove boarding. This is a good trick to visually widen a small room. Try the Georgian range from The English Panelling Company, which would create a similar effect.

This children’s bedroom in a Sussex newbuild belonging to architect Ptolemy Dean is nestled towards the top of the house. The cosy sloping walls are covered in painted wood panelling and decorated with a few choice framed prints. The look is finished with witty touches – a dart board and flags from around the world hung like bunting.

We’re having a bit of a love affair with yellow at the moment, but this has to be one of our favourite applications of the sunny hue: bright yellow shutters combined with a black and white scheme and a few yellow accessories to accent. Amazing.

In the kids’ bedroom of Joanna Vestey’s Oxfordshire farmhouse, a chestnut chaise longue adds sophistication to the room. Playful touches include the large teddy bear and the colourful ‘LOVE’ handmade wool wallhanging by Paul Smith for The Rug Company.

With a characteristic respect for the fabric of this eighteenth-century house in Bath, designer Patrick Williams has carefully transformed it into a welcoming home and B&B. For Patrick, whose company Berdoulat specialises in the reinvention of period buildings, ‘the building itself is the most important client and should dictate what is done to it’. Such is his respect that he did not begrudge the request from the local conservation officer to preserve the original peg joints between the floor joists and beams, even though new steel sections would provide the structural support – a detail that, once covered by floorboards, nobody would see. He delights in the ‘hidden beauty’ of the building – details like the pie-crust-edged chimneypots that ‘can be seen only by Father Christmas’.

This stylish nineteenth-century house on London’s Portobello Road is the work of Eleanora Cunietti, one half of Carden Cunietti design practice. The main bedroom has a rich colour scheme and a palette of teal predominates. The owner loves it. ‘There is something incredibly calming about the colour,’ she says. ‘It reminds me of water, always changing, always different.’ The bedcover is ‘Meadow’ silk by Mulberry.

A rainbow of bright hues shines through this room and touches everything from pillows to walls. When using a strong palette of colors, repeat a particular element to create a sharp look. In this room, circles take the leading role, appearing on bedding, walls, the rug, and artwork. Also use a neutral color, such as white, for furniture, to soften bold colors.

Washi tape is no longer what I thought it was… I must admit that I thought washi tape was a little young and too decorative for too many truly cool projects. This one has me rethinking this belief. I am so decorating my bedroom door with black and purple washi tape this weekend! Be sure to send pics if you do the same- add them in the comments below. This is one of those super easy projects to do at home that you wish you had thought of doing much sooner. So creative, so clever!

Add bold, summery textiles to a light filled room and you’re guaranteed a fresh, summer feeling all year around. We love the hanging lampshades in this room; even without bulbs they make a great feature.

The master bedroom in this petite, 90sq metre family home in London’s Chelsea is the work of designer Eve Mercier. The two Rothko-esque panels that flank the bed are not paint but vibrant silk, while the Fifties-style Danish bedside tables come from Chelsea Textiles (£498 each), a good source for chic and simple designs. On top of them are Forties Quindry lamps.

Interior designer Samantha Todhunter created this girl’s room in a home in south London by combining a stunning bespoke bed, made like an extended button-back sofa, with a fabulous feature blind, prints and a zebra print rug. One word springs to mind: fun.

Far from stark and uninspiring, stripped back wooden floors and plain white walls are the epitome of classic Scandinavian interior design. A personal favourite of mine, there is nothing more relaxing than natural light, contrasting textures and a hint of colour popping through in features such as the statement mint wood burner found in this Scandinavian haven. Simple changes make this interior’s style easy to achieve – think fur throws thrown over white bedding, painted floors with warmth added through sheepskin rugs, a series of monochrome finishes including framed typography prints and industrial elements such as this oversized light juxtaposed with untouched wood finishes found throughout. Image credit

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