theme bedrooms for teens wwe room decorations sale

The main bedroom in Diane Nutting’s manor house in Wiltshire features a showstopping Colefax and Fowler chintz fabric from the 1970s, since discontinued. The sister-in-law of Diane’s first husband was Nancy Lancaster, the owner of the company.

Sedate and restful are good, general concepts for adult bedroom design, but teenagers prefer a bedroom that’s fun and a signature of who they are. The number one response to what personality aspect a teen wants to express through their room was “creative”, while calm came in almost last. Bold, imaginative elements will excite a teen like nothing else. Some unique teen bedroom ideas that add fun to a room include:

David and Lizzie Currie discovered Lucy Ford, a decorator after their own hearts, who transformed their bland west London house into a stylish home to suit their family lifestyle. The cool kids’ bedroom features bespoke children’s beds and storage units by Alistair Robinson of FT2 Design, brought from the Currie’s previous minimalist and architect-designed house.

Taking on the conversion of a disused chapel in Somerset, artist Jonathan Delafield Cook, illustrator Laura Stoddart and their two children (11 and 13 years old) have made the smooth transition from incomers to long-term residents. In this bedroom a simple storage wall has been filled with coloured boxes that match the rainbow pom poms at the window. A sweet mid-century desk for home work sits in front of the window.

In the main bedroom of a large Chelsea flat designed by Sophie Ashby, silk ‘Madison’ wallpaper from Stereo provides a bold background to the set of nude studies from Lorfords Antiques. Complementing the earthy palette of this large space, smart rosewood cabinets flank the bed. ‘It drives me crazy that so often in newbuilds everything is built-in, so I wanted something free-standing and moveable,’ explains Sophie.

Hi Gianna! So glad you found inspiration in this post! This is a round up post, meaning we did not create the projects, but found them on the internet and put them all in one convenient place for our viewers!

Does your child have a favourite book or television character that you’re considering including in a design scheme? Bedding is the clever option as it doesn’t involve too much commitment (and we all now how fickle kids can be). We love the creative use of paint on the walls which works with the theme now but could also be adapted later.

Using a chic modernist pallet of bold colours creates a light and inviting bedroom scene. The walls are covered in ‘Weathered Walls’ by Maya Romanoff at Pierre Frey with a bold patterned curtain from ‘Jardin d’Osier’ silk at Hermès. The mirror from The Conran Shop creates an added depth to the room, and makeshift bedside storage.

The rich, witty and wonderfully eclectic interiors of designer Nicky Haslam’s sixteenth-century, gothic-revival hunting lodge have long been coveted by all of us here at House & Garden. So when we heard he was producing a furniture range for Oka, based on pieces from his own home, we were extremely excited. Following his motto ‘use something red and gothic in each room and you’re all right,’ the collection has ogees, points, tracery and quatrefoils a-plenty, offering the chance to recreate at least a part of his look. House & Garden shot the collection in situ at the house. Here in the bedroom ‘The Original Orangery Stepped’ bedside table, works beautifully with the vertical floral border on the wall (a lovely decorative idea for older houses) and antique chintz bed canopy.

For grown-ups a bedroom is a place of tranquillity and calm. But do young children have the same needs? A bedroom is their space – a chance to distill their rainbow coloured personality into a single (usually fairly small) room. And children come with a lot of stuff – which usually means they’re living in the aftermath of a tornado of toys. Organisation is key – it’s all about creating order from the chaos without becoming a control freak. Which is why I love bedrooms with clever, inventive storage. The trick is to balance your desire for organisation with plenty of bright, colourful, child-friendly fun. Beds with built-in storage, slim-line desks and bookshelves are all great ways to use every scrap of space as efficiently as possible. The clever furniture and pops of colour in this photo are neat enough to please the grown-ups whilst still being perfect for the kids. Image Credit

Tweens are notorious for being a fan of one thing one week to totally flipping and loving else the next. Shelving and under-bed storage leave room for them to store things until they’re cool again.

Washi tape is no longer what I thought it was… I must admit that I thought washi tape was a little young and too decorative for too many truly cool projects. This one has me rethinking this belief. I am so decorating my bedroom door with black and purple washi tape this weekend! Be sure to send pics if you do the same- add them in the comments below. This is one of those super easy projects to do at home that you wish you had thought of doing much sooner. So creative, so clever!

WoW! The bedroom by Samantha Pynn is incredible and perfect for us. I got married couple of weeks ago and we’re moving next month to our new apartment. So I was looking for special bedroom decoration ideas and got the perfect one!

If you’re in the market for a new bed, consider a bed with drawers underneath for extra storage. If space is so limited that drawers may not open easily, use decorative bins under your bed for additional storage. We love milk crates and other woven baskets that hold up well and look great doing it.

I love the fact that my bedroom is a comfy nook tucked under a pitched roof. To highlight the cosiness I have painted the pitched roof in a dark anthracite, that is ‘Down Pipe’ from Farrow & Ball. The atmosphere is meant to be calming and soothing. The overall colour scheme is moody with various hues of blue and grey. For that dash of boho style I’ve opted for a few houseplants around my bed and West African vintage indigo throw with a traditional pattern. It’s my favorite place to unwind from long and stressful days. Image credit

As a designer, there is nothing more important when telling the story of a shared space, then showing BOTH personalities of a room. It’s OK to break the rules. Symmetry isn’t always best. Meaning, and Intention on the other hand, is what great design is all about. It’s what I have built my entire Design Business on. Image credit

Bedrooms aren’t just for sleeping anymore. This hanging bubble chair provides a unique place to read and study, as well as the girls only ladder-accessible secret hideout. To keep this spacious bedroom from getting cluttered, designer Randy Weinstein added plenty of storage options, from the modern open bookshelf to the built-in closet organizer.

‘I got it off Ebay for £200’ says designer Diana Sieff of the four-poster bed in the bedroom of her Oxfordshire home. ‘I like using big furniture in small spaces, because it gives the illusion that the room is bigger. Although I did have to take the finials off the bed posts, as they hit the ceiling.’ One of Diana’s trademarks is to forego curtains in favour of shutters. ‘I had them made,’ she explains, ‘which I prefer because they are minimal and less light-excluding.’ The walls are covered in – ‘Adams Eden’ by Lewis & Wood.

A contemporary blue wall paint, loud print bedding and some favourite records hung on the walls: it doesn’t take much to create a cool bedroom for a young teenager. You can throw the bike in too if you’re feeling generous!

well,not bad the rooms are quite good i’m13 &i think its nice but seriously get more purchasable rms cause lke my rms are big but not as big as that gush and some of those rms look lke A BOY’S ROOM WHICH I’M NOT SURE THEY WILL LIKE(no offence) by the way HAPPY NEW YEAR guys!!! which is tomorrow or next funny right ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.

Warm gray walls serve as a blank canvas to accommodate bright furniture and accessories in this little girl’s bedroom. A whimsy upholstered kid’s headboard mimics the shape of a house, and a yellow footboard and mirror add bright color. A hopscotch rug ties the room’s colors together while also providing a fun game to play.

As a teenage girl, I can honestly say that the only two rooms which appeal to me in any way are the tenth one and the last one. The rest look like a marshmallow vomited on them. Stereotypical and kinda disgusting.

As much as possible, owner Anne-Marie tried to match the wall colours to those that her grandmother had used, keeping the bedrooms the same subtle colours, but adding ‘ribbons’ of colour to outline the architecture and ‘dress the room’.

If you’re a ‘less is more’ person then this is the bedroom scheme for you. The key is in keeping colours muted but the furniture interesting – the four-poster bed has presence and works well with the high ceilings in this room; anything less and the room may feel bare.

When it came to designing this Chelsea home, Stephen Eicker most enjoyed working on this bedroom, belonging to the owner’s two sons, aged three and six. His starting point was the eldest’s obsession with trains, and this led him to the wallpaper by The New Yorker cartoonist Saul Steinberg, which he teamed with a turquoise carpet with red-and-white fabrics. Accessorised with vintage toy trains, the room is original and playful without being overdone or saccharine.

With a characteristic respect for the fabric of this eighteenth-century house in Bath, designer Patrick Williams has carefully transformed it into a welcoming home and B&B. For Patrick, whose company Berdoulat specialises in the reinvention of period buildings, ‘the building itself is the most important client and should dictate what is done to it’. Such is his respect that he did not begrudge the request from the local conservation officer to preserve the original peg joints between the floor joists and beams, even though new steel sections would provide the structural support – a detail that, once covered by floorboards, nobody would see. He delights in the ‘hidden beauty’ of the building – details like the pie-crust-edged chimneypots that ‘can be seen only by Father Christmas’.

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