teenage mutant ninja turtles bedroom decor for girls +girls bedroom with dormers

From the bold purple color palette to the vintage pieces and fashion-inspired fabrics, everything in this room will transition well as a tween girl becomes a full-fledged teenager. To invest wisely with tween room updates, emphasize color and pattern instead of themes. See more of this bold, eclectic teen room >>

Relocating to Oxford after 15 years in Japan and Hong Kong, the owners of this Victorian house put together a team of experts to create a mostly open-plan layout, full of intriguing design details. The spare children’s room on the third floor has specially made built-in bunks.

A large, internal glazed window provides views from the main bedroom into the sitting room and vice versa, while a concealed Venetian blind provides privacy. The bed sits on a 60cm podium, elevating the floor level and allowing access to all the cupboards. It raises the bed to provide views through the internal window across the sitting room to the leafy square that is at the front of the house and the window that overlooks the rear of the building.

The naturally subdued color scheme of rustic style is perfect for a small space. Use weathered wood, an interesting ceiling fixture, and whimsical touches like the faux animal heads in this enviable room from Peace Design to give your bedroom lots of interest.

The color white is an expansive and practical choice for a small bedroom. It keeps the space from looking too busy or boxed in. Using white or lighter colors combats the absence of large wall space or windows to brighten up the space.

Wendy Nicholls of Colefax and Fowler has honed her personal and professional style in her London flat which is full of Victorian accents and unique accessories. Wendy’s bedroom has a softer palette, with an embroidered bedspread from Chelsea Textiles. Walls of pale mauveish grey show off the yellow silk of the four-poster’s simple, unlined curtains. Her shock revelation is that they were made from silk taken from the curtains in the yellow drawing room at Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler’s Brook Street building. That room, with its lacquered buttercup walls and three pairs of massive curtains hung about with passementerie, was a shrine to decorating, an emblem of their grandest classical style. Was it heresy to cut up its curtains? Wendy quickly assures that these were the last remnants of earlier pairs, which had fallen into shreds.

This bedroom may be sparsely furnished but the chosen pieces – a luxe purple velvet headboard, an uber elegant side table and the beautifully printed ottoman, spread and cushions – have serious design impact. Then of course there is the stunning statement peacock feather wallpaper. Wow.

Ett Hem in Stockholm must be one the most beautiful hotels in the world. Designed by Ilse Crawford of Studioilse, the traditional bones of the room, including the Swedish tiled stove in the corner, work beautifully with playful modern pieces. For a similar knitted pouf we recommend getting the real hand-made deal from Claire Anne O’Brien, who can take bespoke commissions.

I all honesty, I don’t see how this is supposed to help make the most out of a small room. First of all, they just look like normal bedrooms. And anyay, I guess it’s not what I googled for. The reason I was looking for a post on how to maximize on small room space is because right now my bedroom is also my living room is also my office. I live in NY and I am SURE I am not the only person with this sort of living arrangement. Real estate costs. And quite frankly we are paying for every cubic inch of space in a room here in the city, meaning loft beds and over head storage and really anything and everything to maximize on space and provide order to a multi-purpose room. I don’t need to make my small space LOOK bigger. For what? I need it to feel functionally bigger, since I can’t actually have it bigger.

The main bedroom of Jo Vestey’s Oxfordshire farmhouse has Jo’s photographs on display and a Japanese light on the desk. Exposed beams, wooden floorboards and the desk contrast nicely with the white rug and walls, giving an overall look that is both clean and rustic.

‘We needed somewhere we could live and work, with undeveloped buildings in which we could photograph catalogues, and with land for animals and a potential for a garden,’ says Matthew. They found the rundown farmhouse, Ham Court, which had once been the gatehouse to Bampton Castle. The property, on the edge of Bampton village and surrounded by 30 acres of land, provided them with an irresistible opportunity to breathe romance back into a series of neglected and derelict buildings.

After 40 years at Colefax and Fowler, owner Wendy Nicholls is clear about what makes a good interior, and the decoration of her London home reflects the style she has honed both personally and professionally.

Many little girl’s bedroom themes can be loud or trendy rather than timeless. If you’d rather avoid them, look for more subtle ways to incorporate a child’s interests or hobbies. For a ballet enthusiast, dress the room in shades of pink, plenty of ruffles, and a few nods to her passion, such as a display of tutus and a piece of art, rather than a whole ballet-slipper bedding set and suite of accessories.

Famed for her work on Firmdale Hotels, Kit Kemp’s own home is unsurprisingly full of her trademark mix of pattern. The fabric used for the bedhead and cushions in the bedroom are by Christine Van Der Hurd.

There’s no denying that it’s the wallpaper that makes this room. The pretty, ditzy print used to paper the whole room is combined with classic white furniture and a pale cream carpet to ensure the overall scheme is not too busy.

For a girly look, choose heart bedding and pretty curtains to match. A pink table lamp continues the theme, while furniture in a light-coloured wood is more subtle and won?t overpower the girly furnishings and colour scheme.

Stylists Gabby Deeming and Florence Rolfe transformed this historic timber-framed barn with crisp linens and accents of bold colour. The main bedroom features a nineteenth-century iron-framed half-tester bed hung with bold red striped curtains.

The owners of this west London house employed a skilled team to restore and complement its original features, and create a home with a feeling of permanence after a lifetime of moving. The house is a tall, mid-nineteenth-century white stucco building that they wanted to work well for twenty-first-century family life. ‘We were determined to avoid beige banker chic,’ the owner explains. A portrait by Betsy Podlach above the Howe fireplace inspired the palette for the main bedroom.

Designer Mark Gillette makes careful use of colour and lighting in his flat, proving that even small spaces can handle a dark, dramatic palette of jewel-like amber offset with black and white. ‘I’m not afraid of colour, but I like to keep it contained,’ he says. The well-positioned light above the bed is useful for reading but also spotlights the white bedding, bringing light and space to the centre of the room. The clothes storage is also a clever design feature, both practical and beautiful.

I absolutely adore decorating my children’s bedrooms from their nursery start to their teenage finish, as each stage requires something different. We are in the school-boy phase at the moment with my son so we wanted to create a bedroom for him that showcased his personality as much as his age. We chose a daybed here with underneath drawer storage for his clothes and a pull out bed to turn it into a double bed, if he had a sleepover. I like to choose a theme that won’t over-power a room and one that can grow with him too. We went for a red and navy theme with a London twist. I like to keep the bedrooms neutral and when it’s time to change the theme you don’t also have to change the wallpaper and furniture too. Kids enjoy space to roam free so I don’t like it to be cluttered too much with more furniture. My son doesn’t have a dresser as we have plenty of space in these drawers under his bed and in his wardrobe. This leaves more space for his toys and room to play. I think the best thing to do is think of how you can make the space functional for your little one that screams his/her personality but in a way they can love it and grow with it over the years with minimal changes.

Interior designer Ursula of Room to Bloom recommends creating a workspace with a fold-down desk, as it gives more floor space for play and sleepovers. To further enhance the illusion of space and make the most of the room’s limited light, Ursula opted for a white, Scandinavian-inspired colour scheme, which was in keeping with the rest of the house.

We wouldn’t necessarily have considered a bold green for a bedroom but when used on a feature wall in an otherwise neutral room and combined with some pretty floral bedding, it’s fresh and spring-like. We love it.

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