teen girl bedroom _rainbow room accessories

In the London apartment of Venetian designer Alvise Orsini, ricepaper has been painted to match two eighteenth-century Chinese wall panels found at auction. ‘It is impossible to tell the difference,’ he says. The gilded bed, possibly by Georges Jacob (1739-1814) was found in Paris, while the eighteenth-century velvet bedcover, embroidered with gold thread, was acquired at a Christie’s textiles auction.

The concrete floors and exposed brick painted in white may create a cool warehouse feel but the nonchalantly styled books and pictures, as well as the texured bedding and soft throws keep the scheme from being sterile.

Soft pastel hues and floral touches against white washed walls create a pretty, spring-like bedroom. The painted decorative iron bench may have been intended for outdoor use but it fits perfectly with the garden-fresh scheme.

The decoration of this bedroom by Hackett Holland is dramatic, yet still has an element of restraint. Beautifully proportioned, unfussy pieces don’t fight with the dark paint (‘Smoke Blue’ from Marston & Langinger), while pockets of colour are added by art and an Ikat lampshade.

Kids love to climb up into a raised bed but this option will also create extra storage space underneath or, as in this case, a little play area, decorated here with a highly textured rug and sweet wallsticker.

Wow, interesting article. Maybe, this is of interest, I recently hired Furnishr to design my living room. I know, I could have designed my room by myself, but I actually liked the designs on their site. Pretty great service. They designed, delivered, and setup my new living room furniture and decor in less than a week. Check them out if you’re interested, http://www.furnishr.com/

A contemporary blue wall paint, loud print bedding and some favourite records hung on the walls: it doesn’t take much to create a cool bedroom for a young teenager. You can throw the bike in too if you’re feeling generous!

The rich, witty and wonderfully eclectic interiors of designer Nicky Haslam’s sixteenth-century, gothic-revival hunting lodge have long been coveted by all of us here at House & Garden. So when we heard he was producing a furniture range for Oka, based on pieces from his own home, we were extremely excited. Following his motto ‘use something red and gothic in each room and you’re all right,’ the collection has ogees, points, tracery and quatrefoils a-plenty, offering the chance to recreate at least a part of his look. House & Garden shot the collection in situ at the house. Here in the bedroom ‘The Original Orangery Stepped’ bedside table, works beautifully with the vertical floral border on the wall (a lovely decorative idea for older houses) and antique chintz bed canopy.

The Argentinian architect Mario Cannio has a play on stripes in his bedroom, with shades of olive green and red, and an indigo-dyed bed cover. The bedroom also has its own open fire and wooden blinds fitted outside the windows to shade them in summer. A colourful oil painting hangs above the modern fireplace and below this sit a neat line of artists pigments.

One of the most popular color schemes for a preteen girl’s bedroom is pink, white, and black. Take one look at the room shown here and you’ll see why: it’s the perfect blend of sophistication, innocence, and quirkiness. Stick with black and white on the flooring and the furniture, and you can easily change the theme if your daughter eventually decides she’s too old for pink.  

Tucked away in a small backstreet in Knightsbridge is the home of Tessa Kennedy, a legendary name in the world of interior design, whose work adorns Claridges and the Ritz, and whose clients include George Harrison, Elizabeth Taylor and Prince Jefri of Brunei – for whose apartment she designed a revolving drawing room. Her house is eclectic, opulent and leavened with a healthy dose of kitsch, including this spectacularly theatrical spare bedroom. The walls are painted in pale violet to match the toile on the four-poster bed, bought on the Marche aux Puces in Paris.

Children play everywhere, and their imagination knows no boundaries. The task of parents is to organize space for the realization of these fantasies using discreet and unusual borders. See 6 simple ideas of play zones for kids

In a room belonging to one of her sons, food writer Mimi Thorisson has chosen vintage furniture made of dark wood. Her son has put his own stamp on the room by proudly displaying his collection of toys and curiosities.

Im 13 and have to share a room with my sis whos 15 and everything sparklyand pink, turquise like seriously .Yea i like number 13 and 21 but doesnt mean im gonna get it. My sis doesnt…… well this website makes everything look like too much i lke it and all but again not like im gonna get. this site seems really expenstive so l8ter:)

Just because your space is small does not mean your pieces can’t be large. Use a monochromatic color scheme because it creates an illusion for the eyes. Choose one color family and select variations of it for the largest parts of your rooms. Natural light will also be your friend. Use sheer window treatments or leave them off entirely. Consider furnishings that have multiple purposes. And always, create a space you love!

The children’s bedrooms in Keith McNally’s Notting Hill home allow for storage and organisation – as well as charming touches – like this Toadstool lamp, £55 at White Rabbit England. The East Coast tongue-and-groove panelling and plaster walls aren’t restricted to the kids’ spaces, they’re a theme throughout all of the property (see how he achieved the aged look here).

White bedding provides a crisp contrast to the chintz in the Lake Room of Bowood house; the curtain pelmet is in a traditional swagged style. In 1987, Fiona undertook the task of redecorating much of the house. Having trained at Colefax and Fowler, she brought with her the influence of its quintessential English country-house style.

wow well i really like the roonz and all but you people who dont u guyz are all haterz if ur gonna talk crap then talk crap stop sayin NO OFFENSE and if you cant afford any of the stuff sorry to say this but why u lookin on this website JUST SAYIN!!!!!!!!!!!

In this kids’ bedroom, the white walls, ceiling, carpet and bedding are brought to life with patterned blinds, headboards and a colourful rug. All of the patterns are different, introducing an element of fun to the minimal room. It is the perfect design for a children’s bedroom in a holiday home.

For those who live in small spaces or are short on storage, this chic little wall-hanging from Ikea will keep all your bedside paraphernalia perfectly in place. Or, if you’re feeling particularly crafty you could make your own.

Who wouldn’t wake up full of the joys of spring in this light filled, summery bedroom? If you can’t afford to fill your room with garden flowers don’t worry, the fresh floral textiles and painted white gloss floor (which reflects the natural light) will do the trick alone.

Bold colours and a variety of smart textures and weaves showcase wool’s versatility in this bedroom. Green ‘Fennel Leaf’ walls (paint from Sanderson) and padded headboards feature in this twin room. The latter are ‘Olympe’ from Ensemblier London and covered in ‘Folklore’ by designer Kit Kemp, available from Christopher Farr Cloth.

I really enjoyed looking at some of these designs but really who could afford the room style, plus not everyone has a room that big, just giving my oppinion I think you should add more of a variety like homto decorate a tiny bed room! And maybe a medium bedroom or a Midteen and not to modern I found this very future like and is not what anybody in my small town does! Thanks Just putting that outheir!

I love this luxurious bedroom designed for a colour blind client. The careful mix of pattern and texture maximises the visual impact he gets from it, without being overwhelming for anyone else. It’s a large, bright space that could take a lot of colour without looking busy, and can easily absorb big pieces (the bed is actually a super king). The walk-in wardrobe has a to-die-for amount of storage in addition to the 3 massive wardrobes alongside the bed, which allows for everything to be put away and hidden, so that you can  enjoy the bright colours and still have a tranquil space to escape to. Deep jewel tones, such as the turquoise Porta Romana Thread lamps,  and matt metallics allow the scheme to be both rich and restful. The style is very much that of a small boutique hotel – creative and encouraging. It’s not a room you go to to unwind and declutter your mind – it’s an exciting destination in itself. Every texture is interesting,  inviting and playful. The Stark carpet is wonderfully soft under food, and the silk bed throw from Soak and Sleep has a luxurious and subtle sheen to it. Image credit

Tongue-and-groove panelling adds New England-style charm to the spare room (in what used to be the butler’s pantry) of this 1830s London house restored to its original style by interior designer Max Rollitt. The touch of a chair used in place of a traditional nightstand is particularly charming.

Creating a cosy play area in the corner of the room is easy. All that’s needed is a heavy pile rug and plenty of cushions – we love the mix of neutrals and brights here. The modular shelving and lighting further delineate the area from the rest of the room.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *