pinterest forever forest circo girls bedroom |black pink and white room ideas

Pair antique furniture with an eclectic assortment of glassware and fabrics in aqua and jewel tones to create a scheme that piques the imagination. Eighteenth-century bed, £4,500, at Alex MacArthur. Fifties lacquered dressing commode (aqua), £4,600, at Talisman.

Be still our beating hearts. With a removable bed slide, den of cushions on the upper level and Liberty print curtains, this kids’ bedroom designed by Violet & George Interiors is the stuff childhood dreams are made of.

The key to creating a cosy space? Three words: layering, layering, layering. Whether it’s pattern, colour or texture (all three is even better) more is more. To keep it from looking messy, make sure to repeat colours throughout the room and ensure there’s plenty of solid colour to break up the scheme.

The guest bedroom in Argentinian architect Mario Connio’s Andalucian farmhouse once housed a bread oven. it is painted a beautiful cornflower blue that enhances the relaxed Mediterranean feel of the room.

Most of these rooms are okay, but none of them gave me any idea wse on how to redecorate my room. First of all, every single one f these rooms are way bigger then mine. Second of all, who has that kind of money to buy all that expencive looking furnishing?

Sometimes, just one small detail which can bring a room together. In this case, the studs surrounding the bed’s cream headboard draws the eye, making the furniture the focal point of the room in the absence of any wall art. A perfect alternative for walls (or homes) where you can’t hang pictures.

In the daughter’s bedroom of a west London house, the ceiling has been painted to look like a circus tent, using Farrow & Ball’s ‘Rectory Red’ and Paint and Paper Library’s ‘Slate I’. The addition of a large basement extension to the house has freed up space on the upper floors for bright and capacious rooms, and a more fluid layout, ideal for family living.

A sense of timelessness combined with simplicity and sophistication characterises Arnaud Zannier’s collection of hotels, as well as his shoe business. It is a design ethos reflected in his family home near Ghent. Refined and relaxed, the home echews trneds and adopts classic style instead. Exposed wooden beams, full of knots and character, envelop the room and the bed, giving it a cosy cabin feel.

I love the cool, calm feeling of interior stylist Pella Hedeby’s bedroom, with its abundance of natural light, crisp white linens and beautiful monochrome accents. The cladding on the wall behind the end offers the perfect framed display units for artwork and scented candles, and I always love a low console table at the foot of the bed for displaying coffee table books and keeping rows of footwear organised. Image credit

A golden rule of decorating is that you need to have neutral elements (white, or wood) to let the eye rest. Here, the rule is turned upside down, with the simple bed taking a backseat to the more unusual wardrobe, chair and wall art.

The bamboo desk in the main bedroom of textiles designer Susan Deliss’ French country house came from Golborne Road, London. The curtains are made from heavy French linen, dyed a bright pink – here Deliss proves that pink needn’t be precious, it can be bold and punchy when used correctly.

The colour coral is back in vogue. According to Josephine Bennett, head of design at Laura Ashley, warm tones of sable with touches of coral give a subtle and slightly less feminine feel to this colour scheme. We like.

Moody, masculine & deliciously unconventional, Scott Newkirk’s New York bedroom is my idea of the perfect retreat. I love the way he has skilfully coupled a restrained & muted palette with a medley of textural layers from metal & woods to linen, wool & length-upon-length of natural burlap. He has created a surprisingly luxurious getaway which is both atmospheric & calming. Image credit

The colours are peaceful and pleasant, as they are throughout the house. ‘Above all, I wanted the colours to be calm; this pale colour palette makes a narrow house seem less claustrophobic and fussy, and meant that I could add pattern through the other textiles.’

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