pink dresses for girls +young bedroom furniture

To furnish the rooms of Song Saa, the private island hotel in Cambodia that she part owns with her husband, Melita Hunter travelled widely through South-East Asia gathering ideas and commissioning craftsmen. This four-poster bed was commissioned in Cambodia, and copied from a design Melita had seen in Chaing Mai. It is hung with White Muslin from Thailand.

Do you love anything flowery or botanical? The stately rose design bedding in our collection can help you express the style you prefer. With bedding that shows white roses in full bloom layered on a navy background, you bring a vibrant look to life within your dorm room. Partnering the bedding with sheets in solid colors of pink navy, gray and ivory helps you fully express the elegant look you’re going for. Brighten up the room with storage trunks and carts in bold color options. Hanging sheers in lavender or light blue on your windows completes the entire look.

After 40 years at Colefax and Fowler, owner Wendy Nicholls is clear about what makes a good interior, and the decoration of her London home reflects the style she has honed both personally and professionally.

Does your daughter have princess tastes, but your budget is a little less kingly? No worries, you can easily add pretty touches without spending a fortune. Take a tip from this room found on C Magazine, and adorn a simple bunk bed with lots of colorful tassels. Next, add a collection of fun and colorful throw pillows, and then hang a feather boa on the wall. Voila, the bedroom is ready for your little princess and your bank account is still intact.

In designer Ben Pentreath’s flat, both bedrooms are papered. As Ben explains, ‘I like using wallpaper because I love the layers of pattern and colour that it brings to a room.’ Soane’s delicate ‘Seaweed Lace’ wallpaper contrasts with the bold blanket from Pendleton in the main bedroom. A Marianna Kennedy ‘Spring’ lamp in blue adds a different colour to the room.

Detailing and subtlety of colour are trademarks of designer John Minshaw’s interiors, and the barn conversion he shares with wife Susie illustrates this perfectly. The bedroom pairs William Yeoward bedlinen with a blue headboard and black furniture.

This children’s bedroom is in an airy attic space. The gable wall has been papered in Sandberg’s delicate ‘Mika’ wallpaper, highlighting the architectural shape of the apex. The wooden floorboards have been painted in a practical, wipe-clean gloss paint. A calico teepee is a fun den – for something similar try Hobbycraft.

What a view! Admittedly, only a lucky few can call an ocean front bedroom their own. However, this bedroom is not just about the view. In my opinion it perfectly interprets what I call the key elements of successful bedroom design: clean lines and uncluttered surfaces in combination with warm materials, rich textures and soothing colours. Add a few pools of light and you got yourself the perfect recipe for a cosy haven of relaxation. In this particular bedroom they took it a further notch up by adding the element of fire, creating a truly harmonious environment and perfect balance. Image credit

I absolutely love this bedroom and it has actually inspired my own bedroom makeover. The bold use of indigo is classy and sophisticated and creates a sleep-inducing atmosphere. Blue is a very calming and soothing colour to use in the bedroom and can aid restful sleep. The use of chunky knits, Damask prints and patterned cushions adds to the cosy feel of this room. Image credit

The main bedroom of Charles Rutherfoord and Rupert Tyler’s London home is on the first floor. The minamilist space features little else but a bed, a deer hide rug, a taxidermy jaguar and an armchair by Pierre Paulin. Single-pane windows make the most of the garden views.

Interior designer Virginia Howard had no intention of moving from Knightsbridge to Pimlico, until a balcony flat in a nineteenth-century garden square changed her mind. The bedroom is decorated in a pale green colour scheme. The elegant, Grade II-listed stucco building overlooks the garden square in central London, bringing the outside in. Two meagre bedrooms were knocked into one generous one, filled with light from the floor-to-ceiling windows.

When designing a bedroom, the most obvious place to start is with the bed. After all, without a good bed, it’s difficult to get a good night’s sleep. Make sure you choose the right size bed for the size of your bedroom. A super king size bed will dominate a small bedroom, making it difficult to move around the space or fit in any other bedroom furniture, while a standard double bed might look a bit lost in a large bedroom. Measure your bedroom, and make sure the bed you choose will allow for at least 70cm of circulation space around the sides and end of the bed.

Designate areas in a bedroom for specific purposes. A cozy bench by the window is a sunny spot for reading. Big baskets on a shelving unit house toys and books in a central location. A small table in the center of the room can be set for tea with friends or can be used as a work area for art projects or studying.

This is a beautiful girl’s room. The room has been done in child friendly and soft colours. Alphabet decals are put on the wall perhaps to satisfy the concept of play way learning. There is colour everywhere to hold the interest of my little princess so that everything around her fascinates her.

If your little girl has a knack for geography, consider girl’s bedroom wallpaper that has an educational flair. In this globetrotter’s room, a map of the world takes up the entire accent wall. Here, she can plan her next big adventure or be inspired to pick up a few library books on the eastern hemisphere. Plan the bedding and textiles around the found in the global designs. 

In this boys bedroom the floor has become a design feature. Blocks of wood were stained in a variety of colours before being laid in a parquet style. The result is rustic yet aesthetic, modern but not at all clinical. The union jack pillow on the bed is a witty reference to the owners’ time spent in the UK.

Make a classic color scheme little-girl friendly with a splash of citrus. In this traditional blue and white bedroom, fun accents of orange add pop. The major elements in the room—the wall, the bed, and the side table—are in blue so the space remains restful.

Amazing collection Emily! Among all, the design of Alina Isaev is the one that captured my attention the most. Perfect combination of simplicity and elegance, this is what I want my dream room to look like.

Nurture the art lover in your teen by decorating their bedroom walls with prints they’ve picked. If their room is already a technicolour dream, pick a portrait that incorporates as many of the colours as possible to tie the room together.

Blending several personalities and decorating styles in a shared bedroom can be tricky. Keep the space looking cohesive by choosing one bedding style for every bed. In this room, compromise was key in the planning stages—especially when it came down to girls’ bedroom colors. One girl who loves bright, bold colors got her way with a stand-out painted ceiling, while her sister scored with neutral walls and a patterned rug. Shared girl’s room decor can make everyone happy with a little compromise.

The children’s bedroom at the Playa Grande Beach Club is furnished with twin canopy beds dressed in a playful mix of pretty, sophisticated fabrics. The bed canopies are an easy bit of decorative DIY to recreate at home – simply wire a length of fabric to the ceiling of the room. Vintage leather trunks at the foot of the bed are the perfect place for chucking toys at the end of the day.

This children’s bedroom in a Sussex newbuild belonging to architect Ptolemy Dean is nestled towards the top of the house. The cosy sloping walls are covered in painted wood panelling and decorated with a few choice framed prints. The look is finished with witty touches – a dart board and flags from around the world hung like bunting.

An attic conversion is the perfect place for a kids’ bedroom. Children will love feeling like they have their own little den under the eaves and with clever, chuck-everything-in storage solutions, there’ll be plenty of space.

A bed with a half-tester canopy made by J Gee Blinds takes centre stage in the main bedroom of a London flat designed by Charlotte Crosland, accessorised with a fleur-de-lis cover by Neisha Crosland and cushions that mirror the floral motifs on the decorative wall.

The lovely Pickwell Manor in North Devon has given us some serious interiors inspiration: a grand sleigh bed, heavy dark wood combined with antique pale green and floral details. It’s traditional in the best possible way.

This beautiful soft industrial bedroom featured on the cover of the launch issue of Warehouse Home – and it’s been proving very popular! The original features of a warehouse conversion, such as exposed brickwork, can often feel ‘hard’ and ‘masculine’. Old and new steel furniture is especially striking in such spaces but can also feel cold. When styling the Warehouse Home bedroom (above), we wanted to prove that industrial chic can have a soft side. A bespoke galvanised steel pipe bed, designed exclusively for Warehouse Home by Inspirit Deco, was the focal point of our warehouse bedroom. And beside it, a vintage industrial bedside cabinet. We then used a ‘masculine and feminine’ palette of greys and blush pinks and a variety of textured fabrics (linen, tweed, velvet), to bring warmth to our bedroom and soften the industrial look. Select vintage accessories complemented the warehouse conversion’s heritage features, while flowers and decorative vintage glassware further enhanced the “femininity” of the space. Image credit

Girls bedroom ideas, like these, reflect to a mother’s imagination. This is a traditional bedroom, done up predominantly in pink colour, generally associated with girls. The hearts on the wall paper and the curtains leave my heart fluttering. Again the pillow cover and the window treatment have been streamlined and is looking beautiful.

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