pink and purple bedroom pictures |bed babes

The romantic French theme is hardly unique, but the owners of this real home opted for a few unusual touches – notably a green scheme instead of the traditional pink – plus a clash of prints and original furnishings for a bedroom that’s full of personality.

Designer Ebba Thott has kept a simple elegant feel in this London bedroom. With the problem of a large window at the end of the space, she has created a sense of entrance and drama through symmetry – placing the bed, which is flanked by two stylish mid-century wooden nightstands, directly in the middle of the room; and using a blind that is dramatic in its scale, but simple in its design. Pictures stacked on the floor rather than hung give a clean, relaxed feel.

In Steffanie Brown’s 10-year-old daughter’s bedroom, interior decorator Henri Fitzwilliam-Lay has subdivided the walls for a sock-it-to-me impact, introducing a psychedelic cloudscape (‘Clouds Sonic’ by Aimée Wilder) above the picture rail and a restrained print below (‘Tile’ by Cole & Son). ‘She wanted a funky bedroom,’ says Henri. ‘I tried to give her what she was looking for, without doing something that would later drive you bonkers.’

My favourite minimal bedroom. A tranquil but bright space, painted floor-to ceiling in white. All the texture is in the layering of the fabrics, the crumpled linen and the tactile woollen throw. A simple bedside table holds a few bedroom essentials, with an unobtrusive light above for reading and one stunning picture is the focal point. Perfection. Image credit

My favourite bedroom has got to be my own. First of all, our ‘Breaking Bad’ style crocheted throw. Doug and I got completely addicted to this piece of TV genius and are convinced it is going to seriously influence Interior Trends for the next decade – the architecture in Albuquerque is so nice: slightly Mexican with a modern ‘edge’. The artwork above the bed is by my husband, Douglas. His work is our pension. The 1980’s style TV in the corner is a reassuring presence, as is the retro gas fire – all perfect for our unique, one off 1970’s house. The wire shelving racks are the perfect place to put books, phones and our industrial style inspection lamps. Image credit

It is hard to say how many times in my life I have heard the ‘no bed next to a window’ rule. It’s definitely more than a few. Fortunately, rules are made to be broken. If your bedroom is extraordinarily small, you might have limited options on where you place your bed. You can always find a way to put a bed in front of a window and make it look more awesome than awkward, and here we have one example. Thanks to the curtains which frame the window perfectly and the fact they go from wall to wall, the design achieves a luxurious and purposeful look. Symmetry is key here, as the bed lines up with the window in a pleasing, balanced way. The top of the headboard is perfectly in line with the window sill and is not obscuring the window. A calming palette of colours creates a cosy space with a seductive feel. Image credit

It was fitting that a nautical colour scheme of blue and white was chosen for this fisherman’s cottage in Cornwall. If you’re afraid of mixing pattern, start with stripes. (And check how to mix pattern.) A variety of sizes in the same colour adds interest, yet fits with the calm atmosphere of a bedroom.

A bright aqua bed frame pops against the lighter shade of the accent wall for a lovely color effect in this girl’s bedroom. A coral dresser is a great feminine touch while a mix of pillows adds an array of colors for a bright and fun finish. 

Create a bright and fun girl’s room by combining green and white paintwork with pink accessories and floral motifs. The extendable pine bed has been painted to create country charm, while Cath Kidston soft furnishings complete the girly look.

Create a fresh, Moroccan-style look using brightly coloured fabric and accessories against a crisp white background. A DIY trim of cotton pom poms (‘Sherbert Pips’, £7.95 a metre from Clothkits) on the bedcover adds an inspired touch, while the matching Designers Guild curtains and cushion (‘Savine’, £140 a metre) ties it all together.

Tip: If your child wants a specific theme, aim for elements that can be interpreted multiple ways. Here, the parents chose to leave the monkeys, elephants, and clowns at the real circus and instead incorporated a tent theme that can be worked into other decor as the years go on. 

I think it is pretty low of you to post that you are giving a certain number of hacks and when we click on them we only get about half. To get the rest we have to share, REALLY? Next thing you know, we will have to pay for them. I have seen most of them and the ones I haven’t will eventually come up with no requirements. It’s not like you came up with these yourself and have exclusive rights to them,

For the teen that’s great at keeping her space clean, an all-white bedroom is a luxurious and ultra-cozy option. To pull off this look, add interest with metallic accessories and a mix of fabric textures.

Does your child have a favourite book or television character that you’re considering including in a design scheme? Bedding is the clever option as it doesn’t involve too much commitment (and we all now how fickle kids can be). We love the creative use of paint on the walls which works with the theme now but could also be adapted later.

The naturally subdued color scheme of rustic style is perfect for a small space. Use weathered wood, an interesting ceiling fixture, and whimsical touches like the faux animal heads in this enviable room from Peace Design to give your bedroom lots of interest.

WALLS ‘Roman Emperor Intaglio Cases’, by Bridie Hall, £455 each, from Pentreath & Hall. FURNITURE Ebonised wood George III-style dining chair, £1,800 a pair, from Guinevere. ‘Courtesan’ lacquered pine four-poster bed, by Pedro da Costa Felgueiras, £9,250 excluding mattress, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Spear Trophy’ cast-iron table, £5,400, from Cox London. Nineteenth-century painted-wood and stool, £5,900, from Rose Uniacke. ACCESSORIES ‘A4 Bookcloth Boxfile’ (pink), £28.50, from Pentreath & Hall. Silk-covered notebook (aqua), by Shepherds Bookbinders, £75, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Vienna’ (flamenco) bed curtain fabric, cotton velvet, £170 a metre, from de Le Cuona. Linen bedding, from £48 for a pillowcase, from Larusi. Velvet cushions, £65 each, from Kirsten Hecktermann. Cashmere throw (antique gold), by Begg & Co, £695; velvet ‘End of Bed Quilt’ (slate), by Niki Jones, £199; both from The Conran Shop. ‘Column’ brass and glass lamp base (pink), £450; ‘Orange Flame’ silk lampshade, by Melodi Horne, £310; both from Pentreath & Hall. ‘Jour’ glass, by Inga Sempé (aqua), £30 a pair, from Nude. Chinese oxblood-glazed porcelain ginger jar (used as vase), £550, from Guinevere.

Anna Potter’s bedroom is everything that I look for in a place to sleep.  Warm, calm, welcoming and homely. The dark grey walls and bed linen have a sense of calm, like a gentle hug, welcoming you to bed.  The oversized vintage map above adds a sense of drama and no need for a headboard.  The room is filled with history, a hand-me-down chest of draws, holiday souvenirs, and the owners own artwork on the walls.  A vintage, comfortable and stylish space.  I could sleep there quite happily. Image credit

Schooled in matters of taste by her mother, when designer Emma Burns inherited the former stables that her parents had converted as a weekend retreat, she put into practice the principles that now guide her professional work for Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. This cosy bedroom has beamed ceilings, and is furnished mainly with antiques.

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