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Beautiful Bedroom Ideas: 16 Design for Teenage Girls 20 Girls Room Design Ideas Modern Ideas For Twin Girls Bedroom In Many Colors Modern Accessories Tips For Girls Bedroom Teenage Girls Bedrooms: How To Decorate Your Room

The son’s bedroom in a Chelsea flat designed by Sophie Ashby has a cloud mural by Surface View – a copy of Constable’s Study of Cirrus Clouds. Velvet cushions and a spray-lacquered Danish desk from Ebay add to the blue theme, while the Zak + Fox fabric on the headboard provides a strong contrast. Animal motifs and a small workspace make this a perfect kid’s bedroom.

When deciding on bedroom colour ideas, you should remember to consider not just the walls and floor, but also the furniture and choice of bedclothes. Simple magnolia walls, for instance, can be offset with ebony wood-tones and dark fabrics for a cool, stylish look, or with bold, vibrant fabric choices to create an overall design that’s young and funky. Whatever colours you choose, it’s important to remember that you have to sleep in your bedroom, so make sure the overall effect is peaceful and conducive to relaxation.

When it comes to children’s decor, my eye is always drawn to white, airy rooms with playful details to add warmth and colour. Jenson’s gender neutral nursery is a perfect example of this, with his sweet ladybug bedding and special wooden toys out on display. There’s space to let him play unrestricted, with stylish storage boxes to tidy away any clutter afterwards. It’s also a room that can easily grow with him for years to come. Whilst monochrome is the trend of the moment, it can be surprisingly tricky to get right. The key is to find a balance and you can do this by adding in more soft tones and textures such as wooden accents, a fun wallpaper or contrasting prints. Not only does it make the space more interesting, but it doesn’t restrict you to one overly coordinated look. Have fun with styling and sourcing your key pieces and it will shine through in your child’s room! Image Credit: Holly Nicholls from Jenson & Beau

Ecclesiastical iconography, oriental fabrics and a collection of hanging lamps, mainly from Turkey, imbue the main bedroom of Tessa Kennedy’s London home with a colourful eclecticism. The curtains formerly belonged to the ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev and the Gothic bed was used as a prop in the 1966 horror film Eye of the Devil.

Situated between Marrakesh and the Atlas Mountains, the holiday home of Colefax & Fowler’s Trudi Ballard, is decorated in a combination of English country-house style and traditional Moroccan elements. The site of the house is perfect: down a dirt track or two and into an olive grove, where the house seems almost part of the landscape. At the end of a gravel path is a studded wooden door leading to a shaded walk and then a cool, airy hall through french windows. This bedroom has a pretty delft-blue palette, with an Indian cotton bedspread and plates above the chimneypiece from Fez.

Forget stars and stripes, it’s all stars and spots in Zara Home’s new kids’ range. Your little ones won’t be growing out of this fun black, white and red scheme anytime soon. In fact, we Kind of want it in our rooms.

After 40 years at Colefax and Fowler, owner Wendy Nicholls is clear about what makes a good interior, and the decoration of her London home reflects the style she has honed both personally and professionally.

Why not perk up your bedroom with a simple bed canopy. This curtain was created with two fabrics from Fermoie and edged with rufflette. The top of the canopy is covered with a simple frame edged with a scallop trim.

When it came to designing this Chelsea home, Stephen Eicker most enjoyed working on this bedroom, belonging to the owner’s two sons, aged three and six. His starting point was the eldest’s obsession with trains, and this led him to the wallpaper by The New Yorker cartoonist Saul Steinberg, which he teamed with a turquoise carpet with red-and-white fabrics. Accessorised with vintage toy trains, the room is original and playful without being overdone or saccharine.

Silver, gold and bronze touches in the bedroom of one of Sarah Stewart-Smith’s daughters at their family home in Herefordshire. Wooden floors enhance the country-house feel and a cosy bedthrow adds warmth. Beams exposed after Sarah discovered them behind plaster boarding in the charming 1786 cottage she now calls home.

I have a thing about exposed brickwork in the home. Along with floorboards it gives a raw feeling. Love it. This lofty bedroom is light and airy and the sporadically placed furniture makes it a little quirky. The white palette gives a sense of tranquillity and the addition of some playful colours makes it homely and inviting too. Image credit

The soft setting of this room, with classic period features like cornicing and the palest grey colour scheme, is given a touch of the exotic with a carved wooden bed and Eastern-inspired printed and textured textiles.

Designer Candice Olson created the ultimate girl’s getaway by turning a small bay window into the background for an inspiring workstation and craft area. The white built-in desk unit provides plenty of drawers, cubbies and cabinets for keeping supplies tucked away and out of sight. Dramatic magenta track curtains create an easy separation between workspace and sleep space.

Just because the room is small doesn’t mean the bed has to be. We love the elegant four-poster from Guinevere, in this house in Cap Ferret designed by Guy Allemand and Jonathan Tuckey. Furnished sparingly, apart from the fantastically clever storage flanking the door; the lack of furniture makes the view of the sea beyond the balcony doors the main event.

The children’s bedrooms in Keith McNally’s Notting Hill home allow for storage and organisation – as well as charming touches – like this Toadstool lamp, £55 at White Rabbit England. The East Coast tongue-and-groove panelling and plaster walls aren’t restricted to the kids’ spaces, they’re a theme throughout all of the property (see how he achieved the aged look here).

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