pictures of cool rooms for teenagers forest themed bedroom accessories

Bedding can make or break a space, especially in a tween girl’s room where anything too cute can be too juvenile and anything too highbrow can be too adult. Instead of traditional florals, add an updated touch to a tween girl’s bedscape with overscale botanical prints.

For a scheme in House & Garden’s August 2017 issue, Acting Decoration Editor Ruth Sleightholme worked with wicker designs and French textiles in a bedroom with distressed paintwork and tiled floors in Atelier Vime’s eighteenth-century hôtel particulier, Hotel Drujon.

Open-plan living is made cosy with warm touches to this mews house in London owned by designer Caroline Riddell. Upstairs in Caroline’s daughter’s bedroom, ‘Vertical Stripe’ wallpaper from Timorous Beasties lines the walls, adding to the fun blue-and-white scheme. A blue velvet headboard, along with various textiles, creates a cosy feel in this small space.

I love the way this black and gold room turned out. The best thing about this room was it was very affordable to decorate, as most of the decorations are from Gordmans, Hobby Lobby and the At Home Store and the bedding is from Target.

The comfortable guest bedroom features a moss green headboard, with Victorian style cushions and bedspread. Their brief to Gavin Houghton was to make the house traditional and cosy, featuring the best of classic English interior decoration.

Wall stickers are a great way to add a little personality to a child’s bedroom; they are also by no means permanent so once your child outgrows this charming woodland tea party theme it’s easy and inexpensive to make changes, without damaging walls.

Lighting offers an opportunity to add personality while also introducing different styles and design eras. When it comes to tween girl’s rooms, vintage light fixtures are almost always a sure-fire hit. As retro styles become increasingly popular for tween and teen girls, it’s smart to consider searching local flea markets and thrift stores for fixtures from the 1960s and 1970s. This brass and smoked Lucite chandelier is from the mid-1970s and is considered a modern classic. Should the tween girl grow tired of it, the fixture can be used in another area of the house or, since vintage pieces hold their value, it can be sold online through a vintage consignment mega-site.

Tween girls are known for taking a major interest in fashion. Play up the runway by using fashion fabrics for her room’s upholstery. While this pair of Louis armchairs is upholstered in violet velvet, it’s made fresh with pillows sewn from women’s dress fabric in a flame-stitch pattern.

Architect Francesca Oggioni had to set aside her rationalist principles when she was planning a new layout for her listed house in west London, so it would work as a family home, workspace and backdrop for an extensive art collection. This spare bedroom on the top floor has neutral decoration allows the artwork to be the focus of the room.

Despite her classical aesthetic, Gytha has incorporated more modern touches in the flat. She opted against cornicing in favour of a cleaner finish and enhanced the New York loft effect by painting all the window frames dark brown.

‘We loved the cool, pared-down style of a house belonging to a Swedish art collector, which we had seen in a magazine,’ says the owners of this west-London terrace home. Enter designer Hugh Leslie. The top floor of this west-London is devoted to the children, with the son’s room in off-white and the daughter’s in soft green, plus a bathroom on the half-landing. Hugh’s talent for joinery is evident here as well: tongue-and-groove recesses frame the children’s beds, with capacious cupboard space on either side.

Make study and homework time more appealing by adding a sleek, grown-up desk to her bedroom. Pretty jars will keep pencils, pens and markers in place and add decorative appeal. Keep the top of the desk cleared off to inspire a welcoming workspace. Design by HGTV fan nu2tn

Formerly a rabbit warren of small, dark rooms, this Victorian house in west London has been opened up, flooded with light and filled with the owners collection of art and furniture, to create a balance between its original character and modern style. The main bedroom and bathroom design proved problematic, due to the Victorian dimensions of the five-metre-wide space. The soft lighting and gentle palette brings to mind the inviting warmth of an art gallery. A charming arrangement of mostly Modern British oils and drawings, which owner Ben Whitfield collects, rests on a built-out picture shelf that doubles as a headboard.

Once the basics are in place, decorating is where the fun begins. Choose a feature to be the focus of your room. That can be a beautifully upholstered headboard, a fancy mirror, a few indoor plants, or simple and clean white bedding combined with a fluffy rug.

Pale pink chiffon curtains and Bambi print bedding and accessories will appeal to the girliest of little girls, but combining these with granite grey panelled walls ensures the scheme is not too sacharine for adult aesthetic sensibilities.

i’m 13 and really dont like any of them some are really childish because teens want there bedrooms to look older by the way i’m not being rude its just what i think and the rest are just horrid yuck ew

I don’t know about you, but I find that having non-themed rooms in my home is essential to the ever-changing needs of family life. What’s more, themed rooms spells hotel. And do we want to live in a soulless hotel? Thought not. Ask yourself, as children grow out of their beds, share with a sibling or move rooms, could their ‘old’ room be adapted as a snug, study or dining room? The littlies’ needs change so much and so quickly in those first few years, it really makes sense to go for a scheme that is multi-purpose but, most importantly, timeless. Turn convention on its head and experiment. This Farrow & Ball wide stripe is supposed to be hung vertically but I couldn’t resist flipping it ninety degrees. For furniture, see what you can find in flea markets and slap a coat of paint over it, or rummage around in local auction houses. Brown furniture is still well-priced and besides, it is so much more fun for a child to be grabbing their clothes out of an old chest of drawers that has a story to tell, than an identikit piece, hot off the production lines from China. Although they will only appreciate it (there’s always hope) when they move out, taking their ‘old friend’ with overall effect is much more personal and full of character, which is what makes a home your home.

This blend of pink and purple is perfect for little girl’s bedroom colors that will grow with the child. Give the feminine shades a unique twist with thoughtful application. Pair it with soft neutrals and hints of periwinkle for a classic-meets-glam vibe. This room’s lavender walls, window treatments, and throw pillows work well for a teen, and later on it can suit a guest room. The classic furniture pieces suit either purpose, and simple switches can introduce more subdued accent colors.

A feature panel behind a bed always looks great, whether it’s a contrasting paint colour, a wallpaper or a picture wall. These shimmering mosaic tiles fit perfectly with the girly, vintage inspired scheme.

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