little girls decor +photos of girls bedroom

Tasked with reinventing a conservative Park Avenue apartment, New York-based designer Sandra Nunnerley has created a modern, relaxed space that has an aura of calm. In the main bedroom, the headboard is in Holland & Sherry ‘Spectator’ fabric, with Mike and Doug Starn’s ‘Structure of Thought’ print hung above it; the doorway to the left leads seemlessly through to a dressing room to leave the main room uncluttered. Sandra describes the result as ‘timeless luxury and refinement’, without sacrificing a sense of modernity.

I don’t know about you, but I find that having non-themed rooms in my home is essential to the ever-changing needs of family life. What’s more, themed rooms spells hotel. And do we want to live in a soulless hotel? Thought not. Ask yourself, as children grow out of their beds, share with a sibling or move rooms, could their ‘old’ room be adapted as a snug, study or dining room? The littlies’ needs change so much and so quickly in those first few years, it really makes sense to go for a scheme that is multi-purpose but, most importantly, timeless. Turn convention on its head and experiment. This Farrow & Ball wide stripe is supposed to be hung vertically but I couldn’t resist flipping it ninety degrees. For furniture, see what you can find in flea markets and slap a coat of paint over it, or rummage around in local auction houses. Brown furniture is still well-priced and besides, it is so much more fun for a child to be grabbing their clothes out of an old chest of drawers that has a story to tell, than an identikit piece, hot off the production lines from China. Although they will only appreciate it (there’s always hope) when they move out, taking their ‘old friend’ with them. The overall effect is much more personal and full of character, which is what makes a home your home.

Originally Rita’s room before the expansion of her London flat, the spare room has curtains in ‘Broadcloth’ felt from Hainsworth and is lined in Tyler Hall’s ‘First Bloom’ wallpaper from Tissus d’Hélène, with a Guatemalan tapestry that Phil brought back from his travels.

Blending several personalities and decorating styles in a shared bedroom can be tricky. Keep the space looking cohesive by choosing one bedding style for every bed. In this room, compromise was key in the planning stages—especially when it came down to girls’ bedroom colors. One girl who loves bright, bold colors got her way with a stand-out painted ceiling, while her sister scored with neutral walls and a patterned rug. Shared girl’s room decor can make everyone happy with a little compromise.

Keep the overall palette calm and soft with different shades of warm grey on the walls, floor and furniture. A burst of yellow on the pillowcases and occasional bedroom chair keep the look vibrant without becoming too much. Embroidered and patterned cushions in black and white are a pretty finishing touch.

Proof that one can still create a functional, stylish bedroom in a small area. A bunk bed with a built-in desk frees up space for a sofa, and built-in storage, hidden hanging rails and wall pegs ensure the room is kept clutter-free.

Think neutral bedrooms have to be boring? Then take a look at this masculine, relaxing, and anything-but-dull bedroom from architect and designer Patrick Brian Jones. When the palette is quiet, clever use of subtle pattern adds interest without overwhelming the small space. A folded throw blanket in a contrasting hue adds extra oomph to the foot of the bed.

In this guest bedroom, I wanted to create a fresh, but calm atmosphere. I’m a big believer that “less is more”, so I kept the styling to the minimum. White walls and crisp black and white bed linen give an airy feel to the room. The photos on top of the bed add a splash of colour that I believe is needed in every room. Yet the colours are not too vibrant to break the tranquil atmosphere. Colour and wooden details soften the overall look and make the room more inviting. All in all, it’s a bedroom in very Scandinavian style: minimalist and relaxed, made for living. Image credit

Designer Henri Fitzwilliam-Lay, the owner of this Victorian country house in Shropshire, has enhanced the interiors of this grand property with her signature mid-century aesthetic without compromising original features. The daughter’s room features striking striped wallpaper by The Art of Wallpaper and contains lots of bright, clashing patterns. This fun scheme makes for a lively space.

This bedroom resides in a period home with high ceilings, classically inspired mouldings and beautiful parquet flooring. As if that isn’t enough, it’s filled with a mixture of mid-century furniture and lighting, breathtaking art and a sophisticated and restrained colour palette. For me it is the embodiment of ‘timelessness’. It will look as good in ten or twenty years time, just as it wouldn’t have looked out of place thirty years ago. It’s also impossible to tell if the owner is male of female. Another sign of simple good taste. And it’s no museum piece, and has all the attributes of a comfortable and restorative bedroom. The pillows are plump and smooth. There’s an extra wool blanket to ward off winter chills. There’s a warm rug for bare feet, and the reading lights are positioned just where they are most effective. There’s even candles handy for when the mood dictates. If I was to add anything, it might be a padded headboard, but then the artwork wouldn’t be centre stage. That’s another word for this room. Considered. Image credit

Velvet cushions and a spray-lacquered Danish desk from Ebay add to the blue theme, while the Zak + Fox fabric on the headboard provides a strong contrast. Animal motifs and a small workspace make this a perfect kid’s bedroom.

Bright pops of colour are a simple, stylish choice for a kids’ room and works well against plain white walls. Make it modern by using accent colours not just on cushions, but beds, furniture and even the window shutters.

Prior to this tween girl’s bedroom redesign, the walls were covered in bright lilac paint, which gave it more of a little girl’s identity. In order to make it cool enough for a tween yet classic enough for parents, the space would be painted a dark shade of violet, the dated wall-to-wall carpet would be replaced with gray-toned vinyl plank flooring and the childish furniture would be swapped out for colorful vintage pieces.

Light green walls and a headboard in Colefax & Fowler’s ‘Evesham’ give this bedroom designed by Caroline Harrowby a fresh, floral look. Its eclectic style is made elegant with pretty curtains and a painted dressing table from the owners’ previous home.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *