interior design teenage girl bedroom ideas +sayings for girls bedroom walls

I’m a 14 year old girl, and I am re-doing my small bedroom. None of these (with the exception of the first one) are realistic or what I’m looking for. I hate the unoriginality of the modern rooms and the pompous air in the others.

Take a leaf out of the Vidago Palace Hotel in Portugal’s book by mixing masculine (sleek, heavy furniture and dark colours) and feminine design elements (pastels, fresh flowers) for a beautifully balanced room that’s strong, yet oh-so chic.

Made.com founder Chloe Macintosh’s bedroom is an elegant combination of deep blue walls and oatmeal coloured stripes. For fabric with a similar feel try Romo or Le Gracieux, who both do a striped cotton with a similarly painterly feel.

This bedroom may be sparsely furnished but the chosen pieces – a luxe purple velvet headboard, an uber elegant side table and the beautifully printed ottoman, bed spread and cushions – have serious design impact. Then of course there is the stunning statement peacock feather wallpaper. Wow.

A bank of windows frames a pretty picket-fence bed. Surrounded by colorful curtains, the bed is the room’s focal point. Sunlight streams in to illuminate the space, but heavy curtains can be drawn to block out the light for nap time. Although a double bed might look oversized now, it will accommodate a growing child in later years, making it a strategic long-term investment.

Heidi Lightfoot and Steve Gibbons own this mid-century house, built in 1936 by the renowned public sector architect Mary Medd. Vintage Star Wars figures are displayed in one of the boys’ bedrooms, with the white backdrop making the colours of the furniture and accessories even more striking.

A teen will most appreciate an approach to their room as their mini, self-contained apartment where they can spend most of their time comfortably. Regardless of size, a teen’s bedroom needs to be versatile enough for them to spread out and get homework done, hang with friends, lounge and sleep, all while reflecting their personality.

Two headboards? Why not? We love the idea of reusing some reclaimed wood to make a headboard (see how to make one out of old doors here) and then placing another headboard in a different material in front of it (this one is from Zara Home). Very original.

A net of interlocking ribbons attached to blank walls is a great way to display your favorite photos, postcards or other paper memorabilia. Plus, the art can be switched out at any time to suit changing moods, styles or tastes. 

Decorating a little girl’s room has never been more fun! patterned bedspreads and brightly colored walls, here are our tips for creating the perfect room fit for the little princess in your home.

Have a small space? This kids’ room designed by Eve Mercier packs a lot of punch. Housed in a petite family home (a former artist’s studio in Chelsea), this multi-purpose room includes a loft bed, two wall-mounted benches that transform into beds (bed-linen is concealed below), and a third, drawer bed (pictured here) which slides out when needed.

This country-style bedroom features a pretty bed canopy in green and white, setting the colour scheme for the space. A pair of Sixties China table lamps and a collection of framed William Blake prints on the walls add character.

Why not perk up your bedroom with a simple bed canopy. This curtain was created with two fabrics from Fermoie and edged with rufflette. The top of the canopy is covered with a simple frame edged with a scallop trim.

The main bedroom of textiles designer Susan Deliss’ French country house is painted in the softest of blues – pink curtains in an Osborne & Little silk add a contrasting jolt of colour. A mid-century modern chair has been reupholstered in a fresh gingham and the bed quilt was hand-dyed with indigo.

This is a beautiful girl’s room. The room has been done in child friendly and soft colours. Alphabet decals are put on the wall perhaps to satisfy the concept of play way learning. There is colour everywhere to hold the interest of my little princess so that everything around her fascinates her.

Tongue-and-groove panelling adds New England-style charm to the spare room (in what used to be the butler’s pantry) of this 1830s London house restored to its original style by interior designer Max Rollitt. The touch of a chair used in place of a traditional nightstand is particularly charming.

The owners of this newbuild Bahamas beach house turned to trusted interior designer John McCall to provide their house with a British sensibility, practical furnishings and interiors that are not ‘too beachy’. In this bedroom white walls, ceiling, carpet and bedding is brought to life with patterned blinds, headboards and a colourful rug. All of the patterns are different, introducing an element of fun and vacation spirit.

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