image of little girl _cute bedroom vanities

Beds Mattresses Wardrobes Chest of drawers Bedside tables Dressing tables Bedding Duvets & quilts Pillows Mattress & pillow protectors Bedspreads Blankets & throws Cushions & inner cushions Clothes organisers Underbed storage Rugs Curtains & blinds Mirrors Bedroom lighting Open storage system Wireless charging

In newer construction, drywall is normally hollow and supported by vertical 2x 4 wood beams (studs) that are 16” apart. If your bed is set up on a non-exterior wall, use a stud finder to mark where your bed’s wood wall beams are and cut out an alcove. Your new alcove may not be incredibly deep, but it may be all you need for small necessities like an alarm clock or some personal items.

The bamboo desk in the main bedroom of textiles designer Susan Deliss’ French country house came from Golborne Road, London. The curtains are made from heavy French linen, dyed a bright pink – here Deliss proves that pink needn’t be precious, it can be bold and punchy when used correctly.

Despite her classical aesthetic, Gytha has incorporated more modern touches in the flat. She opted against cornicing in favour of a cleaner finish and enhanced the New York loft effect by painting all the window frames dark brown.

for instance i hate how some of the beds are so boring and look so dull and quite frankly UNCOMFORTABLE.. they look like dog beds.. teens want a big fluffy bed thats extremely comfortable !! and looks it to!!!

Yeah, I also got a tip, too; When trying to create to perfect living space, think about what hobbies and intrests you love, this can help you! –And also pick your favourite colour(s) to match together a harmony and

Interior designer Robert Moore is a self-confessed magpie, and his home is bursting with beautiful things: books, photographs and silvery trinkets adorn every surface. The main bedroom is painted in ‘Tablecloth’ by Paint & Paper Library while the mirror was bought in Arundel. Nicholas Haslam will make the pretty gabled headboard to order, but Sofa.com’s ‘Inferno’ bed upholstered in cotton (starting from £695 for a double) is a good alternative.

This sweet, galleried play area designed by Trine Miller, has the dual function of creating an adventurous play space, while also keeping toys contained and out of view. ‘The idea was that the gallery was very much their private space,’ says Trine, ‘rather like a tree house.’ Beneath, a small bathroom has been installed.

This Parisian loft features ‘Floating Armchair’ by David Hodkinson for Red Edition in the centre of the playroom. The design makes good use of the small space with playful hanging components on the wall, a blackboard that is both useful and decorative and a snug day bed tucked under the eaves. White walls welcome natural light into the small bedroom, which is important in a loft conversion. The clean, white wooden floors give the room a more spacious feel, in keeping with the clean lines of the Scandinavian-style armchair.

Forget stars and stripes, it’s all stars and spots in Zara Home’s new kids’ range. Your little ones won’t be growing out of this fun black, white and red scheme anytime soon. In fact, we Kind of want it in our rooms.

House & Garden decoration editor Gabby Deeming has created a relaxed summer-holiday feel with a Mediterranean-inspired selection of wood and antique metal furniture. The oiled-oak ‘Clyde’ side table, is £550 from Pinch, while on the floor, the blue striped cotton dhurrie rug is from a selection at Guinevere antiques.

The Nordic countries know how to nail stylish design that’s also kid friendly. Case in point? This adorable baby mobile from Danish company Ferm Living. It’s perfect when paired with traditionally Scandinavian blonde wood, but equally looks great with any baby room scheme. Scandi-licious!

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The soft setting of this room, with classic period features like cornicing and the palest grey colour scheme, is given a touch of the exotic with a carved wooden bed and Eastern-inspired printed and textured textiles.

Inspired by masterpieces, our decoration team paired tactile and luxurious textures in deep velvets with bedlinen decorated with roses. A low-hanging, Oriental-style lamp illuminates the centre of the room, which, in the morning, is flooded with light from the huge window. The result is an astonishingly effective and achievable mix of opulence and simplicity.

Made.com founder Chloe Macintosh’s bedroom is an elegant combination of deep blue walls and oatmeal coloured stripes. For fabric with a similar feel try Romo or Le Gracieux, who both do a striped cotton with a similarly painterly feel.

This bedroom belongs to Vanessa and James Macdonald’s son, Rupert, at their family home in the rolling hills of Oxfordshire. The red gingham of the headboard and armchair compliments the patterned red and white curtains. Soft neutral colours in the carpet and on the walls allows the red to pleasantly pop rather than overwhelm the room.

A spare bedroom with wooden furniture and a window seat in the terrace house of Lady Wakefield. The beautiful Georgian window – found in a junk shop on the King’s Road – was added in 1998 by the owners.

The architectural style is late Georgian, with generous sash windows, deep eaves and a dash of Italianate villa, thanks to a balcony that sits above the drawing room bay, and a pair of triple-arched windows across the first floor of the south-west façade where terraced lawns drop away to woodland. This bedroom embodies the modest grandeur of English country-house style. The walls are in ‘Linen Stripe’ by Arthouse.

Teen bedroom ideas should include functions specific to their age, as well as look great. While prefer a space that’s calm and understated, teens appreciate vibrant, high energy rooms. Keep the following teen bedroom ideas in mind.

This sweet daybed, with its heavenly canopy and pretty metallic wall stickers, makes for the perfect girls’ bedroom retreat for reading, napping or simply daydreaming. Dusty lilac walls and the lack of clutter also has a calming effect.

‘My client’s bedroom is on the first floor, in what originally would have been the grand drawing room. The windows are lovely and big; they are the key to its appeal. I like the architecture to do the talking, so rather than obscure the windows with curtains, I’ve added plain bottom-up blinds. I have a weekness for pink, so I enjoyed including my client’s artwork… But neon is my favourite, hence the tube light from Mr Resistor,’ explains designer Harriet Anstruther of her client’s home in Chelsea, London.

Love Scandinavian style? The combination of crisp whites and cheery colours lends itself well to a kids’ room. Start with white-washed floors and furnishings, then add bright pops of colour with cushions and bedding. Don’t forget quirky-yet-fun accents, like this hanging bird mobile.

Roses sit prettily on the bedside table of interior designer Louise Jones’ bedroom. The vertical lines of a bookcase – holding plenty of bedtime reading material – are echoed by the striped wallpaper.

The wrought iron bed, the clustered display of fresh flowers, the vintage print textiles (we love the mustard yellow and red floral quilt), religious iconography above the bed…We have a feeling there’s a confident and extremely cool designer behind this bedroom.

The key to successful children’s bedroom design is clever storage. Make storage practical, accessible and easy to use, so that children have a place where everything goes. Encourage children to have an input into the colour scheme or theme, if they buy into the idea of the room from the start and have a hand in how it is planned and arranged, then they are more likely to take pride in keeping it organised and tidy. Baskets, trays, cupboards with doors and drawers are all good options. If you have the luxury of space then try to keep storage to the outer edges of the room so that children have a clearly identifiable place in which to play. Room to play in a free and unstructured way allows children to be more imaginative in their learning. Image Credit

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