girls teen red country bedroom decor ideas -bedroom ideas teenage girls classic green

Kit Kemp designed this bedroom for Wool House, a Campaign for Wool exhibition at Somerset house in London. Be inspired similarly by pairing wool items with crisp cottons and shining fabrics like the lamp shade.

I love these neat ideas they always have me thinking about what I could have when I grow up or for my kids !It gives me a percpection of what I am going to do when I grow up!I like these ideas for teens.Although there should be ranges for low class middle class….Like cheap ways to make bedrooms fir teens looking amazing to were they will. Love!!

I don’t know about you, but I find that having non-themed rooms in my home is essential to the ever-changing needs of family life. What’s more, themed rooms spells hotel. And do we want to live in a soulless hotel? Thought not. Ask yourself, as children grow out of their beds, share with a sibling or move rooms, could their ‘old’ room be adapted as a snug, study or dining room? The littlies’ needs change so much and so quickly in those first few years, it really makes sense to go for a scheme that is multi-purpose but, most importantly, timeless. Turn convention on its head and experiment. This Farrow & Ball wide stripe is supposed to be hung vertically but I couldn’t resist flipping it ninety degrees. For furniture, see what you can find in flea markets and slap a coat of paint over it, or rummage around in local auction houses. Brown furniture is still well-priced and besides, it is so much more fun for a child to be grabbing their clothes out of an old chest of drawers that has a story to tell, than an identikit piece, hot off the production lines from China. Although they will only appreciate it (there’s always hope) when they move out, taking their ‘old friend’ with them. The overall effect is much more personal and full of character, which is what makes a home your home.

Bedrooms should be tranquil and relaxing! When I redecorated mine, I chose a very pale grey wall colour with matching bed linen and curtains! I hung my floor-length curtains high up on the wall, and to the sides of the window frames to create the illusion of height and larger windows. This maximises the light coming in to the room, and together with the white painted wooden floor, gives the room a calm and airy feel. I kept the decor fuss free, just adding different patterned textiles in the same colours for some visual interest, and warmed up the look by adding some copper accessories. A light chain and some industrial style cage lights either side of the bed gives a cosy glow at night and my bedtime reading supply (interior magazines) are kept handy by the bed and doubles up as a bedside table! Image credit

Cool beds for girls don’t need to be castle-shaped or have a slide. Sometimes what makes a bed unique is where it’s placed. In this case, the perfect little nook. A happy shade of pink surrounds a sleeping alcove with year-round freshness. The peony pattern is charming for a young girl, yet mature enough to suit her well into her teen years. For a fun twist, pair girls’ bedroom colors, like pink, with a hint of teal. Here, a scalloped border of robin’s egg blue provides a sweet contrast for this playful pink bedroom.

Maximising light and space was essential to show the owner’s post-war art and sleek French art deco furniture to their best advantage in this elegant Pimlico flat. In the bedroom nineteenth-century photographs bought from Portobello Market hang above the bed, while built in bookshelves flank the windows.

After visiting her friend Kathryn Ireland in France’s Tarn region, Anne Halsey bought a French farmhouse retreat there and enlisted the help of the decorator to create a relaxed space perfect for entertaining. This twin bedroom is decorated with a pastel pink colour palette and features white gauzy canopies, which are often adored by children (particularly those who like princesses). The subtle scheme is ideal for young and teenage girls alike as this style is both fun and ‘grown-up’.

When searching flea markets for dressers, keep in mind that nine-drawer and 12-drawer configurations offer enough concealed storage not only for holding clothes, but also for keeping things like books and diaries neatly organized yet out of sight. As tween girls start to yearn for privacy, it’s wise to supply them with storage for things they don’t want out on display.

The Nordic countries know how to nail stylish design that’s also kid friendly. Case in point? This adorable baby mobile from Danish company Ferm Living. It’s perfect when paired with traditionally Scandinavian blonde wood, but equally looks great with any baby room scheme. Scandi-licious!

Children’s bedrooms should be fun, bold and playful. As a designer, I love to let my imagination run wild when working with children’s bedrooms. With a little inventiveness you can create the most wonderful spaces with unusual paint effects and bespoke joinery. Use MDF to create a built in bed in the shape of a house or teepee, section off a corner for a reading area in the shape of a castle or make the most of a tall ceiling with a mezzanine, as in the image above. Children love to have their own special space and creating a reading nook or hiding space allows them to escape into their own magical world. In the past I have designed rooms with tented ceilings, trampoline floors and a bed made from silver birch branches decorated with fairy lights. Go on – have some fun! Image Credit

Despite her classical aesthetic, Gytha has incorporated more modern touches in the flat. She opted against cornicing in favour of a cleaner finish and enhanced the New York loft effect by painting all the window frames dark brown.

Repurpose an ordinary bookshelf by turning it into a kid-friendly storage space. Here, colorful bins provide an easy place to organize kid’s stuff. Once your little one knows where everything belongs, she’ll be more likely to clean up after playtime on her own. Reserve the top shelf of the bookcase to display collectibles and picture frames. Tight storage space under the bookshelf can be reserved for oversized coloring books or posters. 

‘We loved the cool, pared-down style of a house belonging to a Swedish art collector, which we had seen in a magazine,’ say the owners of this west-London terrace home. Enter Hugh Leslie whose unmistakable style gradually evolved the house into a smart family home. At the front of the house on the first floor is the pretty, generously proportioned main bedroom. Its walls lined with the same buff-pink linen (‘Prelle Toile Barbare’ fabric by Alton Brooke) as the pelmets and the curtains, which adds an extra touch of glamour to the room. Behind it is the en-suite bathroom, with simple panelling, hand-built units and a walk-in shower lined in teak, which feels a bit like entering a first-class compartment on a vintage train.

On paper, this room shouldn’t be lovely at all – tiny, with barely any room for even a bed, and crammed with bright colours and clashing patterns. But in reality, this space, which I shot for my book Home for Now, is actually one of my favourite bedrooms I’ve ever worked in. This gorgeous sea green hue breathes life into this bijou space, whilst ingenious storage ideas, such as using a wall-mounted telephone table instead of a bedside unit, and hanging storage pockets on the wall, make best use of the available space. It proves that if you have courage in your design convictions, you can make anything work, whatever the challenge. Image credit

I love glamorous bedrooms that are sophisticated and not too glitzy. I love this bedroom because, even though it’s flowery, it has a masculine edge – due to the opulent dark walls and pared-back design integrity of the rest of the room. It’s a great bedroom for both men and women, which I like, as I think sometimes us ladies can sometimes take over the design of our bedrooms! Image credit

The pale walls, bedding and headboard in this small bedroom are perfect for such a tiny space. Loft conversions always benefit from large windows, such as the one here, to fill the rooms with natural light.

Planes, trains and automobiles: the duvet covers, wall stickers and underbed boxes all draw on this theme. Good storage ensures the room is kept tidy but a simple chalk/pin board allows for a little creativity and a place to display treasured possessions.

For shared bedrooms where the occupants don’t see eye to eye on color, find one hue that appeals to both parties and let each choose an accent color. For multi-hue schemes, include plenty of white to tame the color confluence, like the white furniture in this cute girl bedroom idea.

Coloured lights are always a cute addition to a kids’ room. This display of ball lights strung around a set of white painted ladders is the perfect way to illuminate a corner and create a stylish feature at the same time.

The interior designer behind this West London home was Ebba Thott. In the spare room a steel four poster bed, a modern take on a timeless classic, sits comfortably alongside a custom-coloured blue and white chintz by Marthe Armitage. The bedcover is by Holland & Sherry through Lelièvre in Paris.

i’m 13 and really dont like any of them some are really childish because teens want there bedrooms to look older by the way i’m not being rude its just what i think and the rest are just horrid yuck ew

Everyones saying these rooms look like hospital rooms, or rooms for little kids, or adult women maybey. But there not, maybey one or two of them are, but these rooms really would be great teen rooms. For people who could afford it, and have enough money to where they don’t have to be practical. So like i said before, these rooms are really neat, just not practical, or probably not even affordable.

Jorge Almada and Anne-Marie Midy, the husband-wife duo behind design company Casamidy, aren’t afraid to mix things up in their home. The boys’ bedroom features a mix of leather headboards, maps, vintage airplanes and Marimekko Unikko print cushions.

WALLS ‘Roman Emperor Intaglio Cases’, by Bridie Hall, £455 each, from Pentreath & Hall. FURNITURE Ebonised wood George III-style dining chair, £1,800 a pair, from Guinevere. ‘Courtesan’ lacquered pine four-poster bed, by Pedro da Costa Felgueiras, £9,250 excluding mattress, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Spear Trophy’ cast-iron table, £5,400, from Cox London. Nineteenth-century painted-wood and velvet stool, £5,900, from Rose Uniacke. ACCESSORIES ‘A4 Bookcloth Boxfile’ (pink), £28.50, from Pentreath & Hall. Silk-covered notebook (aqua), by Shepherds Bookbinders, £75, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Vienna’ (flamenco) bed curtain fabric, cotton velvet, £170 a metre, from de Le Cuona. Linen bedding, from £48 for a pillowcase, from Larusi. Velvet cushions, £65 each, from Kirsten Hecktermann. Cashmere throw (antique gold), by Begg & Co, £695; velvet ‘End of Bed Quilt’ (slate), by Niki Jones, £199; both from The Conran Shop. ‘Column’ brass and glass lamp base (pink), £450; ‘Orange Flame’ silk lampshade, by Melodi Horne, £310; both from Pentreath & Hall. ‘Jour’ glass, by Inga Sempé (aqua), £30 a pair, from Nude. Chinese oxblood-glazed porcelain ginger jar (used as vase), £550, from Guinevere.

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