girls kissing in their bedroom +dandelion bedroom decor

Architect Jonathan Tuckey wanted to combine ‘twenty-first-century comforts with seventeenth-century character’ in this timber-lined chalet in this Swiss Alps, which he imaginatively modernised. Jonathan paired the idea of old and new in this first-floor bedroom with a pair of Fifties rosewood beds from Modernisticks and kept the original plywood walls and floorings, which compliments the subtle decoration of the rest of the chalet.

Combining classical proportions and traditional furnishings with the informal elements of family life, this house in Cornwall has proved the perfect acquisition for its owners. Before moving in, they asked the interior designer, architectural historian and natural paint expert Edward Bulmer for his help. ‘Edward has a marvellous eye,’ says the owner. He has a great feel for colour and he is fantastic at arranging furniture and pictures.’ For his part, Edward says that these are delightful clients, and are unusually united on aesthetic decisions. Despite their very different backgrounds, they share a taste for the modest grandeur of English country-house style, for antique rugs, traditional chintz and books. The wall is painted in ‘Ochre’ from Edward Bulmer Natural Paints.

Combining classical proportions and traditional furnishings with the informal elements of family life, this house in Cornwall has proved to be the perfect acquisition for its owners. The house was built in about 1840 for Reverend Samuel Wallis, a founding fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, who inherited the estate and promptly commissioned Plymouth architect George Wightwick, a former assistant to Sir John Soane, to replace the existing house. An eighteenth-century bed in a spare room has a canopy and valance in a reproduction chintz to complement the period features.

A Louis XV-style bed and bedside table, a luxurious sheepskin rug, pink and gold wallpaper and a pearl chandelier. If you’ve got a little princess on your hands, this plush scheme will go down a storm.

Decoration editor Gabby Deeming has played with the colours and textures of natural materials to a serenely simple, Eastern-inspired scheme for this bedroom. Of the cork used on the walls she says ‘There is a warmth and versatility to cork; the wallcovering can also be used as an upholstery fabric.’

While we’re often preoccupied with the grown-up spaces in our homes, it’s important to remember that kid-friendly rooms deserve just as much design-forward attention. Get a playful look — that still fits your overall aesthetic — by taking a few notes from these interiors that nail the balance between style and function.

For interior designer Charlotte Crosland and the owner of this reconfigured central London flat, a shared vision has resulted in generously comfortable rooms accented with splashes of colour. In this spare room, the vibrant decoration includes a yellow Volga blanket and a painted antique chest of drawers from Myriad.

Add some personality to a child’s bedroom with some thoughtful, unusual touches. Display particularly adorable clothes on quality hangers, add some neon polka dot wallpaper and a pidgeon cushion or two… Why not?

What a view! Admittedly, only a lucky few can call an ocean front bedroom their own. However, this bedroom is not just about the view. In my opinion it perfectly interprets what I call the key elements of successful bedroom design: clean lines and uncluttered surfaces in combination with warm materials, rich textures and soothing colours. Add a few pools of light and you got yourself the perfect recipe for a cosy haven of relaxation. In this particular bedroom they took it a further notch up by adding the element of fire, creating a truly harmonious environment and perfect balance. Image credit

This bedroom in a Notting Hill townhouse is dominated by Michael Szell’s cheerful ‘Carnival’ fabric and wallpaper designed for Christopher Farr Cloth. The wall behind the bed has been entirely wallpapered, giving the effect of an extended headboard.

Heidi Lightfoot and Steve Gibbons own this modern, colourful Thirties house in rural Hertfordshire. Built in 1936 by the renowned public sector architect Mary Medd, Sewell’s Orchard was apparently unpopular with the locals at the time, who likened its monopitch roof and pared-back design to that of a canning factory. This is not a view shared by Heidi Lightfoot and Steve Gibbons, however, who have lived in and loved the daring modernist property for the past few years.

These DIY teen bedroom ideas are easy to make and can be customized to fit your taste and personality! Get inspired with these cool crafts for teens and start making your DIY bedroom ideas a reality. Some of my favorites from both Pinterest and Youtube, complete with links to an actual step by step tutorial or video with instructions.

Looking for girls’ bedroom ideas? It’s always great decorating a kids’ bedroom and girls’ bedroom design can be a lot of fun, especially when moving on from the nursery. Like with boys’ bedrooms, there really are no rules – but it’s important to reflect her personality. So where to start? Here’s some inspiration…

The main bedroom of Ptolemy Dean’s Sussex newbuild is decorated in shades of blue and grey. This soothing scheme is finished with touched of dark wood. The curtains are in a floral fabric by G P & J Baker.

I’m a huge fan of simple and functional Scandinavian style with a monochrome and neutral colour palette. This bedroom is quite minimalist, but at the same time has everything you need to relax. I prefer all white bedding (linen bedding is my favourite!) which is in this bedroom combined with some black pillowcases to add contrast against the white wall. I love to bring some warmth into the monochrome interior by adding natural materials (like wood) and also green plants – both of which have been used in this bedroom. Image credit

‘I got it off Ebay for £200’ says designer Diana Sieff of the four-poster bed in the bedroom of her Oxfordshire home. ‘I like using big in small spaces, because it gives the illusion that the room is bigger. Although I did have to take the finials off the bed posts, as they hit the ceiling.’ One of Diana’s trademarks is to forego curtains in favour of shutters. ‘I had them made,’ she explains, ‘which I prefer because they are minimal and less light-excluding.’ The walls are covered in – ‘Adams Eden’ by Lewis & Wood.

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