unique kid bedroom furniture stuff for room

A hanging statement light, like a chandelier, can really pull together a bedroom and give the eye a focal point. The crystal accents in this chandelier add an interesting element of light and texture when contrasted with the wood flooring and bed frame.

consider their room as more than just a sleeping space. As they begin exploring their independence, having a room where they can hang out, study and lounge with friends is almost more important to them than sleep. And the social aspect of a room is big. A survey of global teenagers by smartgirl.org found that the #1 thing a teen would add to their room is a poster of themselves with their friends. Work with your teen to creatively address the following areas in their room:

For grown-ups a bedroom is a place of tranquillity and calm. But do young children have the same needs? A bedroom is their space – a chance to distill their rainbow coloured personality into a single (usually fairly small) room. And children come with a lot of stuff – which usually means they’re living in the aftermath of a tornado of toys. Organisation key – it’s all about creating order from the chaos without becoming a control freak. Which is why I love bedrooms with clever, inventive storage. The trick is to balance your desire for organisation with plenty of bright, colourful, child-friendly fun. Beds with built-in storage, slim-line desks and bookshelves are all great ways to use every scrap of space as efficiently as possible. The clever furniture and pops of colour in this photo are neat enough to please the grown-ups whilst still being perfect for the kids. Image Credit

The globetrotting owners of this west London townhouse employed a specialised team to restore its original mid-nineteenth century features, and create a home with a feeling of permanence after a lifetime of moving. The house is a tall, white stucco building that they wanted to work well for twenty-first-century family life. ‘We were determined to avoid beige banker chic, the owners explain.

Heidi Lightfoot and Steve Gibbons own this mid-century house, built in 1936 by the renowned public sector architect Mary Medd. Vintage Star Wars figures are displayed in one of the boys’ bedrooms, with the white backdrop making the colours of the furniture and accessories even more striking.

This modern bedroom styled by Gabby Deeming was inspired by traditional Japanese rooms with Shoji screens and includes a simple yet elegant futon bed on a platform base from Futon Company. Simple sliding screens have been constructed with pine batons and papered with ‘Sansui’ wallpaper from Zoffany, a pattern of soft mountains. A modern ensuite bathroom houses C P Hart’s ‘Stand’ bath, which is propped on a steel frame.

In this Paris flat, London-based designer Tara Craig has used a strong, simple palette with devastating effect. The walls of the spare bedroom are painted in ‘Papaver’ by Adam Bray for Papers and Paints, with an imposing ‘Carlyle’ headboard from Ensemblier London upholstered in ‘Serpetti’ linen by Martyn Lawrence Bullard.

The artist owners of this London house called on interior designer Beata Heuman to create a family home full of fun, distinctive design. A highly original space, unapologetically theatrical and oozing energy. ‘The owners are both artists. They have quite wild tastes and they love strong colours,’ says Beata. The main bedroom has a bespoke sofa upholstered in Beata’s signature marbleised fabric and lion claw feet. Other notable features include a pair of breglass dance-hall mirrors from French Loft and the ceiling painted in ‘Lulworth Blue’ by Farrow & Ball. ‘I have this thing about painting ceilings blue. It seems over the top, but it adds a feeling of height and once it is in, you don’t really think about it’.

Designer Jane Taylor has ingeniously incorporated storage into her small bedroom in Chelsea. Wardrobes and cupboards are concealed behind panelling made by Sympatico Joinery, which is painted in Zoffany’s ‘White Clay’, from £41 for 2.5 litres of emulsion. Shallow cubbyholes in the panelling next to the bed function as bedside tables.

Young adults are hard to please so give them lots of input. Provide plenty of storage so there’s no excuse for mess, and make sure they have a good study area. Invest in a trundle bed for those sleepover parties, and let them keep their favourite accessories on display in mounted box shelves.

Transforming this tiny attic room into a children’s room for two required some ingenuity. Enter Kate Earle of Todhunter Earle who designed these overlapping bunk beds as a clever space-saving solution.

I love how Martyn Lawrence Bullard combines vibrant colours with serenity and calm in this bedroom; a perfect setting for colour lovers, who want to wind down in a relaxed setting after a hard day’s work. The different textures, such as the fur throw and carpet provide a great contrast to the mirrored bedside tables, which makes the room dynamic and interesting. I also love the ethnic element (Ikat cushions) combined with the ‘Modern Glamour’ style, which gives the room a new dimension. And how great is the coffee table at the end of the bed? I don’t like bedside tables, that are full of books and magazines, so this provides a great stage option that prevents cluttering the room and at the same time looks great! Image credit

The bedroom of decorator Emma Burns of Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler is quintessentially English in both its gentle antique style and its ‘make do and mend’ execution. ‘The bedhead is covered in an ancient patchwork made from my mother’s old dresses. I originally used it as a tablecloth,’ she says. ‘For me the bedroom is as important as the sitting room; it is a place of refuge that I use for resting and reading. I like to fill it with books, pictures and armchairs. I’ve kept a feeling of softness by using a very subtle stippling effect on the walls, and some translucent blinds from Chelsea Textiles under the curtains, which allow a diffuse light into the room. My linen is from Volga Linen.’

This bedroom in Ugbrooke Park was used by the Cardinal Weld (father of the wife of the 7th Lord Clifford) when he visited the house, thus his portrait and travelling trunk remain in the room. The walls of the Cardinal’s Room are covered in ‘Meredith’ in red by Nina Campbell for Osborne & Little, which is also used on the canopy and headboard.

Grey curtains complement ebony drawer units in this smart bedroom designed by Anthony Collett. The room is rich with character, including sound-absorbing, fabric-lined walls, which add texture, and an upholstered, padded wall, inspired by a Ben Nicholson painting, acts as a dramatic headboard. John Spencer Joinery made most of the furniture in the bedroom, notably the ebony and sycamore drawer units. It’s a daring space: sophisticated yet welcoming.

We love this. The dark purple and grey colour scheme, industrial-style light fixture (another example of the bedside light being hung from above, rather than placed on a bedside table) and dappled feature wall all combine to create a beautifully moody aesthetic.

Sometimes there’s much to be gleaned from the design of a good hotel room. This one the Playa Grande Beach Club is painted in what it’s owner calls, ‘faded bathing-suit colours’, and layered with art, objects and vintage furnishings. The bed forms the focal point of a perfectly symmetrical tableau of furniture, starting with the wall mounted lamps and side tables and culminating with the bamboo sofa, coffee table and string chairs which form an appealing seating area for morning coffee and newspapers.

The main bedroom of Jo Vestey’s Oxfordshire farmhouse has Jo’s photographs on display and a Japanese light on the desk. Exposed beams, wooden floorboards and the desk contrast nicely with the white rug and walls, giving an overall look that is both clean and rustic.

Edward Bulmer’s ‘Azurite’ paint has been used on the walls of this blue bedroom, which stars a four-poster bed with a pink canopy from Soane. The design is part of The Scheme: Opposites Attract by Gabby Deeming.

The design of this room is in keeping with the rest of the house, in which all rooms are furnished with Scandinavian and mid-century pieces. Heidi and Steve were collecting these before they met. Pieces sourced from dealers and furniture fairs – and even found in skips – include classic Knoll, Eames, Ercol and Hans Wegner furniture with some contemporary pieces by Hay and Donna Wilson thrown in for good measure. Artwork, including vintage Carry On posters, a Lucienne Day silk mosaic and work by Pink Floyd designer Storm Thorgerson, hangs on the walls.

Planes, trains and automobiles: the duvet covers, wall stickers and underbed boxes all draw on this theme. Good storage ensures the room is kept tidy but a simple chalk/pin board allows for a little creativity and a place to display treasured possessions.

The bedroom in this hotel designer’s west London home features a portrait of the owner, aged 13 by the artist Primo Potenza, which hangs above a mahogany table. Beside it stands a 1930s découpage screen by the surrealist painter and theatrical designer Leonor Fini.

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