that song is dedicated to all the girls in quebec city who have bedroom windows |tiffany themed bedroom

In a spare room at a Belgian art collector’s London home by Feddy van Zevenbergen, the headboard is covered in a Jane Shelton fabric. The panelling was too damaged to restore, so Freddy lined the walls with a dark herringbone cashmere, which contrasts with the pale Italian marble of the bathroom behind.

I would describe this bedroom as ‘cosy contemporary’ and it’s the sort of space I could relax in at the end of a busy day.  It is fairly minimalist, but not as stark as a white or grey bedroom, with an on trend geo pattern and a soft colour palette, with some warmth from the brass lamp and wooden side table.  I also love the white painted floor boards and think it is a look that could be quite easy to re-create. Image credit

I don’t know about you, but I find that having non-themed rooms in my home is essential to the ever-changing needs of family life. What’s more, themed rooms spells hotel. And do we want to live in a soulless hotel? Thought not. Ask yourself, as children grow out of their beds, share with a sibling or move rooms, could their ‘old’ room be adapted as a snug, study or dining room? The littlies’ needs change so much and so quickly in those first few years, it really makes sense to go for a scheme that is multi-purpose but, most importantly, timeless. Turn convention on its head and experiment. This Farrow & Ball wide stripe is supposed to be hung vertically but I couldn’t resist flipping it ninety degrees. For furniture, see what you can find in flea markets and slap a coat of paint over it, or rummage around in local auction houses. Brown furniture is still well-priced and besides, it is so much more fun for a child to be grabbing their clothes out of an old chest of drawers that has a story to tell, than an identikit piece, hot off the production lines from China. Although they will only appreciate it (there’s always hope) when they move out, taking their ‘old friend’ with them. The overall effect is much more personal and full of character, which is what makes a home your home.

For grown-ups a bedroom is a place of tranquillity and calm. But do young children have the same needs? A bedroom is their space – a chance to distill their rainbow coloured personality into a single (usually fairly small) room. And children come with a lot of stuff – which usually means they’re living in the aftermath of a tornado of toys. Organisation is key – it’s all about creating order from the chaos without becoming a control freak. Which is why I love bedrooms with clever, inventive storage. The trick is to balance your desire for organisation with plenty of bright, colourful, child-friendly fun. Beds with built-in storage, slim-line desks and bookshelves are all great ways to use every scrap of space as efficiently as possible. The clever furniture and pops of colour in this photo are neat enough to please the grown-ups whilst still being perfect for the kids. Image Credit

A feature panel behind a bed always looks great, whether it’s a contrasting paint colour, a wallpaper or a picture wall. These shimmering mosaic tiles fit perfectly with the girly, vintage inspired scheme.

Girl’s bedrooms are certainly not relegated to frilly beds and all-over pink decors any longer. Today’s girls bedrooms are as varied as each girl’s personality with styles, colors and motifs in an endless range of possibilities. From baby girls nurseries to young girls bedrooms to preteen girls rooms to teen girls bedrooms, you’ll find a room design and ideas for every stage of a girl’s childhood. Additionally, the 100 girls rooms designs, tips and photos we feature here come from around the world, so you’re sure to find a design that has your little or big girl’s name written all over it!

Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and remove one accessory, Coco Chanel famously advised. The same technique can be used for your home. The removal of a bedside table – leaving the flowers and books on the floor – add an inspired touch to this room.

Can’t find a headboard you like? Customise. Paint one directly onto the wall, create an upcycled version out of old doors, or simply cover an existing headboard in a new fabric like shown here, adding plenty of pattern throughout the room for a cosy, layered look.

Event designer David Stark and his artist husband Migguel Anggelo have reconfigured their Brooklyn apartment to create calm and flowing spaces brought alive by theatrical objects and unexpected finishes. A bedside table from Odegard sits below a vintage wall light sourced by MADE.

The small white bedroom on the second floor of this Victorian terrace house had been painted a rather gloomy blue. To make the most of the light, newlyweds Sophie and Dan opted to repaint the room with Dulux’s ‘Pure Brilliant White’ while lemon yellow accents bring further warmth to the room. The divan bed is furnished with a buttoned ‘Bekkestua’ headboard from Ikea and the cane mirror hung over the bed was bought on a trip to Saffron Walden.

Think neutral bedrooms have to be boring? Then take a look at this masculine, relaxing, and anything-but-dull bedroom from architect and designer Patrick Brian Jones. When the palette is quiet, clever use of subtle pattern adds interest without overwhelming the small space. A folded throw blanket in a contrasting hue adds extra oomph to the foot of the bed.

Made famous by the Rothschild family, the hotels Les Fermes de Marie, L’Hotel Mont-Blanc and The Lodge Park – were built by a local family in Haute-Savoie. Jean Louis Sibuet converted the bones of each hotel, and his business partner, Jocelyne, did the interior design. ‘We started with an oppurtunity in a particular place and time, says Jocelyne, ‘when we find somewhere we find it hard to walk away’. The Sibuet’s latest Provencal hotel is Domaine de la Baume, where each room has its own eclectic style including this bedroom that imbues character with yellow Pierre Frey wallpaper.

A dramatic use of pattern teamed with modern furniture creates a playful yet sophisticated effect in this Notting Hill town house by Suzy Hoodless. The mixologist designer is known for her mild eclecticism and smart monochrome backgrounds. ‘My aim,’ she says, ‘is that when I hand over a house, it is an extension of its owners’ personalities, and with this project we achieved that.’

If space for a tree is tight, miniature box trees look super smart wrapped up in fabric such as velvet and placed on your bedside table. Don’t forget to put a small dish underneath the pot to catch any water.

This grey bedroom has a modern feel thanks to its muted colour palette and the smart black-and-white print on the wall, but the room has been decorated with traditional furnishings. A French wrought iron and marble side table by Raymond Subes sits on a Persian Royal Kurk Kashan carpet.

It pains us to admit, but sometimes even our eagle eyes can miss canny design buys. Case in point? The children’s selection at Designers Guild. A recent visit to their King’s Road flagship store revealed a treasure trove of delightful finds, like this ‘Little Owl’ rug (£195). Which only begs the question: what else are they hiding? Find them online at designersguild.com – where they have not only a UK shop, but US, Japan and Australia shops as well.

For a designer-worthy look, choose a simple color palette of three to four neutral hues and a single, bright accent color like the eye-catching pink in this chic bedroom. Add interest with a variety of bold, trendy patterns and cozy textures like cotton, faux fur, knits, etc.

With a characteristic respect for the fabric of this eighteenth-century house in Bath, designer Patrick Williams has carefully transformed it into a welcoming home and B&B. A neutrally decorated playroom is filled with traditional toys, keeping with the immaculate restoration of this property without compromising on fun.

It was fitting that a nautical colour scheme of blue and white was chosen for this fisherman’s cottage in Cornwall. If you’re afraid of mixing pattern, start with stripes. (And check how to mix pattern.) A variety of sizes in the same colour adds interest, yet fits with the calm atmosphere of a bedroom.

This bedroom ticks a lot of boxes for me with the herringbone floor, contemporary light fitting and soft linen bedding. I always have a soft spot for period properties and the owners of this home have highlighted the gorgeous high ceiling with a dusty pink colour – a bold but highly effective way to add colour into a room without it being overwhelming. Also, by bringing the curtain the full width of the wall, the curtains do not cover the window at all – allowing for maximum light and a really luxurious feel with all of that lovely soft fabric. Image credit

Juggling the demands of a growing family and an interior-design business, Nicole Salvesen updated her south London house to increase the feeling of space with bright colours and more streamlined rooms. Bed quilts from Molly Mahon add colour in Nicole’s daughters’ bedroom.

If you’re lucky enough to have an original fireplace in the room, make a feature (and storage solution) out of it by filling it with soft toys. We love how they look like they’ve tumbled down the chimney. Of course the feature wood wallpaper, pretty wall print and quirky accessories on the mantlepiece up the style factor too.

Turn your bedroom into a haven for relaxation with these bedroom inspiration ideas. From master bedrooms to small bedrooms, get inspired by these bedroom design ideas. Learn how to pull together all the elements that make a beautiful bedroom.

To me, there is nothing better than being able to create a sense of nature inside, connecting the two worlds. Natural fabrics such as linen, matched with cotton and wool knitted throws to create a casual yet cosy atmosphere is perfect for these chilly nights. The wooden headboard creates such a sense of grounding and security, ideal for those of us who need a sanctuary after a long day, but with the use of lighting it softens the overall look. Image credit

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