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The first-floor bedroom of architect Jonathan Tuckey’s seventeenth-century chalet holiday home in the Swiss Alps is ideal for children to share (Jonathan has two daughters), thanks to a pair of fifties rosewood beds from Modernistiks.

Personally I like a child’s room not to have a theme, instead adding decorative touches, so that they can grow with the room. I tend to always steer towards bright pastels and pattern for children, I think it brightens a room and makes them feel clean but cool at the same time. The photo shows a beautiful bedroom for a little girl. I love how it is totally neutral whilst colourful – this room could happily be for a girl or boy of any age. My top picks for a children’s room would always be second-hand furniture painted in beautiful colours, bright simple bed linen, key timeless decorative pieces that can be passed down, photos or artwork to reflect their personalities and loads of storage. Image Credit

The main bedroom in Susan Deliss’s country house in France has a simple headboard made from an antique suzani. The bed is spread with an antique quilt, hand-dyed by Susan with indigo. She has mounted an antique Ikat textile to create an artwork for the wall.

Take a decorating tip from Lisa Teague Studios, and create interest in your small room by placing your bed at a slight diagonal. It’s even better when a pretty folding screen takes the place of a traditional headboard; the screen acts as a focal point for the room, drawing the eye upwards to increase the visual size of the space. Another use for a folding screen in the bedroom is as a privacy barrier around the bed. This is especially good in a studio apartment, or in a shared children’s…MORE bedroom.

Is this not the most magical room? So many beautiful goodies compiled into one amazing room! I spy our gorgeous little wooden rabbit by Oyoy sitting pretty and admiring the view ☺️ You can view our whole range of wooden animals and toys now at the link in

These are way too overboard. I mean who has money to do all this. I personally do not like any of them. Some are too girly whille others are just plain ew. Put something that could possibly be real please.

A good mattress is even more important than the bed it sits on. Take time to choose the right one for you, trying it out in-store if possible, and lying on it in various different positions. Whether you go for an innerspring mattress, memory foam mattress, or anything in between, it pays to invest in a well-made model. A top quality mattress should keep its shape for at least eight years. Check out our guide to the best mattresses.

Everything is so cute , simple and bright. I want to ask if kids blinds is still popular? My little girl want princess castle printed blinds like this https://www.amara.com/luxpad/childrens-bedroom-ideas/ . If it’s nice or better I should buy a normal one color blinds? Also I want to ask from where you bought that bed with curtains? It looks very cozy

WALLS Paper-backed linen wallcovering, ‘Heathered Linens’ (tea rose), 147cm wide, £112 a metre, from Phillip Jeffries. Curtains, ‘Maremma Rigato’ (natural/black), linen, £144 a metre; with appliqué patches in ‘Volterra’ (latte, pine), linen, £112 a metre; and ‘Bolgheri’ (black), linen, £187 a metre; all from C&C Milano. Silkscreen print, Bloomsbury Vase, 51 x 40.5cm, $75, by Wayne Pate. Wooden frame, ‘Milano’ (black), 70 x 50cm, £35, from Habitat.

A lime green and blue colour scheme and a collection of characters, including a line up of sweet stuffed toys and a friendly whale rug, bring this room to life. This corner provides a perfect play spot with some smart storage boxes for kids to dig in and out of.

Sedate and restful are good, general concepts for adult bedroom design, but teenagers prefer a bedroom that’s fun and a signature of who they are. The number one response to what personality aspect a teen wants to express through their room was “creative”, while calm came in almost last. Bold, imaginative elements will excite a teen like nothing else. Some unique teen bedroom ideas that add fun to a room include:

Tip: If your child wants a specific theme, aim for elements that can be interpreted multiple ways. Here, the parents chose to leave the monkeys, elephants, and clowns at the real circus and instead incorporated a tent theme that can be worked into other decor as the years go on. 

A room fit for a princess doesn’t have to purely consist of soft pinks. We love the addition of a fiery orange wall and red, orange and purple rug; the clashing hues of which add character to the scheme.

Interior designer Ursula of Room to Bloom recommends creating a workspace with a fold-down desk, as it gives more floor space for play and sleepovers. To further enhance the illusion of space and make the most of the room’s limited light, Ursula opted for a white, Scandinavian-inspired colour scheme, which was in keeping with the rest of the house.

Soft colors and classic style will keep this girl’s room timeless for years to come. Neutral walls and furniture create a sense of unity and allow patterned bedding and window treatments to be the center of attention. A pattern that isn’t too age-specific allows for her creativity to shine in wall art and painting hung around the room. Lighting treatments are similar with neutral bases and lampshades that can easily be switched out at a low cost. 

Designer Hugh Leslie has not only created a simply chic scheme of primary colours and graphic prints, but a cosy wrap around headboard ensures there’ll be no danger of little ones going bump in the night.

bedroom ideas for girls, There is no doubt that decorating ideas for your girl’s bedroom are a big challenge, to set her dream bedroom. There are a lot of different designs, ideas and options, which you can really apply in your girl’s bedroom, as differs from boys in their tastes and favorites. Indeed, you will involve your girl in her bedroom ideas and designs, your girl may like to have toddlers bedding or other play sets of furniture.

Furniture has been kept to a minimum in the small spare bedroom of interior designer Sarah Chamber’s Victorian terraced house in South London. Lack of space means furniture has been kept to a minimum, with interest added instead by a rich autumnal colour scheme that contrasts brown walls with red accents. This is an easy idea to apply to any small room where space for objects is at a premium. Instead transform the mood of your space using the walls and upholstered furniture as your canvas.

Pattern plays a starring role in the main bedroom of this Chelsea house, the work of decorator Paolo Moschino. This unusual leaf-trellis design is part of his range for Paolo Moschino for Nicholas Haslam, and has been used for the curtains, bedhead, cushions and chairs and costs £99 a metre. The sisal wallcovering is ‘Sable NC07’ from Clarence House. The bench is 19th-century Italian, while the mahogany table is English, from the same period.

This kid’s room features a Hans J Wegner bed, which sets the tone for Danish simplicity in this white space. Simple, modern furniture complements the bright and airy feel of the scheme, while mustard curtains and a framed print on the wall add colour and interest.

ACCESSORIES Fifties abaca-rope table lamp, by Audoux-Minet, £3,200, from Rose Uniacke. Linen bedlinen, ‘Selena’: king-size flat sheet (ciment), £204; pillowcases (ciment), £51 each; and king-size duvet cover (cèdre), £315; all fromCaravane. Embroidered linen cushion covers, from left: ‘Neptune’ and ‘David’, £85 each; stitched cotton quilt, ‘Eeji Beeji’ (white/indigo), £450; stoneware mug, ‘Everyday’ (black), by Emma Lacey, £27; aluminium and fabric wireless speaker, ‘Copenhagen’, by Vifa, £549; all from The Conran Shop.

When decorating my own home, my furniture picks have been dictated by my shoestring budget. This hasn’t stopped me having big ideas for my bedroom. I’ve just had to be style savvy – picking up vintage finds for next to nothing. I always start with soft grey painted walls, then – my tip – is to paint all my furniture in the same colour so they match – helpful when you are dressing your room with higgledy-piggledy junk shop finds. I’m not adverse to modern designs, in fact I think they are key to stopping a budget home looking to retro or fuddy-duddy. That is why I love statement lighting as it brings a modern twist to an eclectic look.  The best bit about doing up a vintage home is these purchases don’t break the bank, and with a bit of hard work can look amazing. And if you tire of it, you can sell it and buy something new – this suits me down to the ground as my bedroom style is always changing. Image credit

WALLS ‘Roman Emperor Intaglio Cases’, by Bridie Hall, £455 each, from Pentreath & Hall. FURNITURE Ebonised wood George III-style dining chair, £1,800 a pair, from Guinevere. ‘Courtesan’ lacquered pine four-poster bed, by Pedro da Costa Felgueiras, £9,250 excluding mattress, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Spear Trophy’ cast-iron table, £5,400, from Cox London. Nineteenth-century painted-wood and velvet stool, £5,900, from Rose Uniacke. ACCESSORIES ‘A4 Bookcloth Boxfile’ (pink), £28.50, from Pentreath & Hall. Silk-covered notebook (aqua), by Shepherds Bookbinders, £75, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Vienna’ (flamenco) bed curtain fabric, cotton velvet, £170 a metre, from de Le Cuona. Linen bedding, from £48 for a pillowcase, from Larusi. Velvet cushions, £65 each, from Kirsten Hecktermann. Cashmere throw (antique gold), by Begg & Co, £695; velvet ‘End of Bed Quilt’ (slate), by Niki Jones, £199; both from The Conran Shop. ‘Column’ brass and glass lamp base (pink), £450; ‘Orange Flame’ silk lampshade, by Melodi Horne, £310; both from Pentreath & Hall. ‘Jour’ glass, by Inga Sempé (aqua), £30 a pair, from Nude. Chinese oxblood-glazed porcelain ginger jar (used as vase), £550, from Guinevere.

Kids love to climb up into a raised bed but this option will also create extra storage space underneath or, as in this case, a little play area, decorated here with a highly textured rug and sweet wallsticker.

If you’re anything like us, you get your design inspiration from anywhere and everywhere – including hotels. Dormy House in the Cotswolds is a contemporary meets country chic weekend retreat attracting smart city dwellers. It also happens to be designed by Emily Todhunter from Todhunter Earle, a name regular readers will recognise. Todhunter Earle are behind many homes we’ve featured and Emily spoke recently at our reader event on hotel design. Inspiring, no?

This simple and beautiful room though small in size, looks enticing. The zebra print and the pink decals impart a novel idea. The wardrobe and the night stand are just right for the size of the room and provide enough storage capacity.

Although professional framing comes with added expense, it’s an excellent way to help a youth-oriented space feel less juvenile and more grown-up. Instead of tacking the original paper directly to the wall, it was instead placed inside a floating-style frame with coordinating mat. When framing pieces for tween’s rooms, always consider durability and safety. Instead of gallery glass, this piece is protected with acrylic, which is kid-friendly and shatterproof.

Teenage girls’ room decorating ideas generally differ from those of boys. When decorating a teen girl’s bedroom, consider making it fit for a princess; after all, her room is her castle. Here are 25 ideas for teenage girls’ rooms.

Classic-boat enthusiast Katie Fontana’s love of pure craftsmanship and aesthetic simplicity resulted in the bespoke kitchen design company Plain English as well a charming houseboat and boathouse where she lives when she is in London. The ex-Customs and Excise cutter called Stork is moored in St Katharine Docks, E1. ‘In 2008, shortly after our father died, my sister and I were in Maldon, Essex, where he lived, Katie explains. We spotted Stork for sale and thought she looked cute. When I noticed she was built in 1926, the year my father was born, it felt like a sign, so I bought her as a little place to stay when I was in London. The interior had been Ikea-ed, and wasn’t really to my taste, but I knew if I covered it all in Farrow & Ball paint it would be fine. One day, I’d like to give her a full authentic refit. For now, she’s a bit of fun.’

Something new and colourful is what I thought I’d do,’ says interior designer Gytha Nuttall of the decoration of her converted nineteenth-century schoolhouse in Battersea. ‘But as the project developed, slowly I returned to all the muddy colours I love best.’

This Victorian flat was designed by duo Lambert & Thurnherr who brought their international flavor to the space, creating a home that is both comfortable and individual. Blue and white fabrics give this bedroom a fresh feel.

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