small room decorations +ballerina barre in girls bedroom on wall

In this Paris flat, London-based designer Tara Craig has used a strong, simple palette with devastating effect. The walls of the spare bedroom are painted in ‘Papaver’ by Adam Bray for Papers and Paints, with an imposing ‘Carlyle’ headboard from Ensemblier London upholstered in ‘Serpetti’ linen by Martyn Lawrence Bullard.

The master bedroom of a converted disused chapel in Somerset owned by artist Jonathan Delafield Cook and illustrator Laura Stoddart is decorated in a neutral colour palette of creams and whites with blue accents provided by the bedding and cushions.

‘To make this room feel more relaxed, we decided to take the symmetry out of the space,’ says Tom Bartlett of Waldo Works, of his designs for London’s new Laslett Hotel. ‘It can be nice to break the rules. Things don’t always have to match: the lamp by Davide Groppi at TwentyTwentyone on the left above the fitted cabinet is different to the ‘Otis’ lamp Nocturne Workshop on the table by Pinch, but they are in the same materials and colours, so they work together. The same approach was used to hang the art, which I always try out first on the floor in front of the wall. One piece was hung and the rest were allowed to extend from it in different shapes up and across the wall. To do this well, you need a variety of frames and a good breadth of types of artwork,’ he says. Other items in the room include grey and blue patterned cushions by Eleanor Pritchard, an orange cushion by Urbanara and a blanket by Tweedmill.

A rainbow of bright hues shines through this room and touches everything from pillows to walls. When using a strong palette of colors, repeat a particular element to create a sharp look. In this room, circles take the leading role, appearing on bedding, walls, the rug, and artwork. Also use a neutral color, such as white, for furniture, to soften bold colors.

Formerly a rabbit warren of small, dark rooms, this Victorian house in west London has been opened up, flooded with light and filled with the owners collection of art and furniture, to create a balance between its original character and modern style. The main bedroom and bathroom design proved problematic, due to the Victorian dimensions of the five-metre-wide space. The soft lighting and gentle palette brings to mind the inviting warmth of an art gallery. A charming arrangement of mostly Modern British oils and drawings, which owner Ben Whitfield collects, rests on a built-out picture shelf that doubles as a headboard.

An upholstered screen is a useful device when working with pattern as it can be moved to fill empty spaces (or hide areas such as a desk in a multi-purpose bedroom) and is relatively simple to when you tire of the design.

I love so much about this baby/toddler room interior. The bunting across the blind really sets a tone for the room and I love the lights hanging off of the ladder, they add a touch of warmth and cosiness to the room – which is exactly how every baby or child’s room should feel. I love that the floors and walls are bright. There’s a blue, white and grey theme which is fantastic because it suits a young baby as well as being grown up enough for a toddler. We’re re-doing our boys’ rooms this year and this image among others is where we’re taking inspiration from. I plan to use a light laminate floor like here and opt for light walls too, contrasting it by using colourful accessories. I think that when it comes to children’s interiors it’s fine to want to go modern, but it’s important to make sure that the room both reflects your child’s personality and is fun and young at the same time. Image Credit

The twin kids’ bedroom in this architect’s minimal family home is decorated in crisp white with fun splashes of bright colour. Elegant cushions make for a cosy corner on the right, while the kid’s workspace features a rustic wooden stool.

Windows in tween rooms are a great opportunity to experiment with design elements which may be considered too bold or risky for common areas of a home such as living rooms or entryways. Consider large-scale patterns in neutral colors such as black, white and gray. Should a tween girl grow tired of her wall color and decide to change the paint, the window coverings will most likely work well with the updated palette.

‘We drove the neighbours mad,’ says Jos White, talking about the three-year renovation of the family’s town house on one of the most desirable streets in Manhattan’s West Village. After extending, gutting and completely renovating their six-storey town house to create open-plan interiors tailored for family living. The house is an enchanting mix of inimate and open plan – the bedroom is no exception. It has a neutral palette accented by a nineteenth-century trunk from Hilary Batstone reupholstered in pink.

This girl’s bedroom designed by Petite Vintage Interiors features some must-haves for ultimate fun and style for little ones. Pastel colours are great in children’s bedrooms, mixing pastel colours makes it really easy to achieve a scheme that is soothing and still loads of fun. I love the pink and mint features that stand out in this bedroom! Next, the wall stickers are a great addition. They are easier, quicker and cheaper to use than wallpaper. Little dots, triangles or clouds are just some of the many choices available. Making storage fun is also important by using cleverly shaped side tables and shelves. The house-shaped shelf used as a side table here is a great example. And you’ll score highly on the fun factor! Image Credit

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