shared room decor easy crafts for teenage girls

House & Garden decoration editor Gabby Deeming has created a relaxed summer-holiday feel with a Mediterranean-inspired selection of wood and antique metal furniture. The oiled-oak ‘Clyde’ side table, is £550 from Pinch, while on the floor, the blue striped cotton dhurrie rug is from a selection at Guinevere antiques.

I love the fact that my bedroom is a comfy nook tucked under a pitched roof. To highlight the cosiness I have painted the pitched roof in a dark anthracite, that is ‘Down Pipe’ from Farrow & Ball. The atmosphere is meant to be calming and soothing. The overall colour scheme is moody with various hues of blue and grey. For that dash of boho style I’ve opted for a few houseplants around my bed and West African vintage indigo throw with a traditional pattern. It’s my favorite place to unwind from long and stressful days. Image credit

I wish I had designed this room – I love everything about it. The bleached natural pine floorboards and tall white walls are a perfect canvas for those pretty vintage pieces and more colourful toys. With a restrained colour palette like this, a child’s room always look stylish, no matter how messy it is. I love kids’ rooms that aren’t filled with matching furniture sets from children’s ranges. Finding meaningful, beautiful pieces gives kids’ rooms personality – it takes time, but this is how the best interiors develop, organically. Quirky details such as the hat collection add fun, whilst the unexpectedly small and contrasting orange pendant adds punch to this calm monochrome scheme. Image Credit

Colourful notes in the main bedroom of artist and designer Bridie Hall’s home include a painting by Mary Fedden and an orange bedcover, made by Bridie. The moody grey paint is ‘Mercury’ by Fired Earth.

A Fifties, brass wall sconce hangs above one of two vintage Scandinavian rosewood chests from Sigmar in this bedroom – the prize find of the project, according to the rooms designer Suzy Hoodless. ‘I slightly wish that I’d kept those for myself,’ she says wistfully. Charcoal coloured walls are combined with a lush velvet headboard in navy blue – one of our favourite bedrooms ideas.

Ok.. these ideas are cool. BUT im 14 and i personally would not pick any of these for my room. Bold colors like these are going to go out of style. They seem cold and bare. The rooms are too big. A normal room would be around 11×12. I personally will not want bold colors, i wouldn’t want them because say when im 17 i dont want people to think im imature. A room should yes desribe a persons personallity but a room should transition easily from young teen to older teen. And people dont want to redo their room every year or two…sorry for being so harsh.

Hi! I’m only 11, but we are moving in like two weeks, and I really want to know what to put in my room. This has been a great inspiration for me, and I really like this site!! Could you post something that I could do with just really easy to get stuff that is probably lying around my house right now? I need to know what to pack!! I love DIYing, and keep up the awesome ideas!!

Soft pastel hues and floral touches against white washed walls create a pretty, spring-like bedroom. The painted decorative iron bench may have been intended for outdoor use but it fits perfectly with the garden-fresh scheme.

Many people believe that a small room has to be painted white or a very pale pastel, but in reality, dark colors make the walls visually recede, increasing the perceived size of the space. And if that isn’t reason enough to consider going dark on your walls, then just take a look at the sophistication, serenity, and beauty of the deep purple walls here. Dark gray, navy or indigo blue, or dusky dark green are equally restful and lovely.

There’s nothing like an in-house retreat to make a child’s room more fun. This girly teepee tent is small enough to include in interior spaces, while still providing ample space for her to sneak away into her own private hideaway. Design by Susie Fougerousse

To make what was a juvenile, childish girl’s room more appropriate for a growing tween, its walls were painted a deep shade of violet, album cover-inspired art was hung to create a focal point, vintage lighting was installed on the ceilings and the walls, and women’s fashion fabrics were used in upholstered accents.

Sara Charlesworth’s bedroom may not be huge, but great textiles, a chic bedside table and some fun accessories are all it needs. The fantastic polka dot bedding, FYI, is from lustworthy US store West Elm, which – rumour has it – is due to launch in the UK soon!

ACCESSORIES Cushions, from left: ‘Verandah’ (burnt orange), by Veere Grenney, linen, £150 a metre, from Tissus d’Hélène; ‘Ombre’ (blue/rust), mohair, 50cm square, £85 each; and ‘Abstract Zig Zag’ (blue), linen, 30 x 50cm, £79; both from The Conran Shop. Linenbedlinen (soft pink), from £30 for a pillowcase; cotton scarf (used as bed throw), ‘Kantha’, 220 x 100cm, £705; glazed stoneware mug, £30; all from The Conran Shop. Maple vessel, by Hans Henning Pedersen, 18 x 15cm diameter, £250, from Flow. Stoneware ‘Round Bottomed Vessel’ (used as vase), by Iva Polachova, £330, from The New Craftsmen. Glazed ceramic and polished nickel table lamp with handkerchief linen shade, ‘Gallatin’ (moss), 73 x 20cm base diameter, £1,895, from Remains.

If you have trouble getting to sleep at night, then you might want to stick with restful neutral tones, combined with soft lighting. If, on the other hand, you find it hard to propel yourself out of bed in the morning, then it’s a good idea to opt for a bright, cheery colour that will make you eager to start the day. Pale hues can be used to open up a small bedroom and create a sense of space, but if the room is chilly or north-facing, then blue-greys should be avoided in favour of warmer tones. When selecting a bedroom wallpaper, dense, busy patterns and a strident palette can work against a restful, calming atmosphere, so it’s a good idea to stick to designs that are are more quiet and subtle.

An elegant iron daybed provides a spot for reading in the day as well as a place to sleep at night. The colourful, characterful textiles and soft toys hung from the bed and walls keep it young and fun.

‘I wanted the house to be comfortable above all, and for me colour is very much part of that,’ says Jacquie Rufus-Isaacs of her eighteenth-century farmhouse in the Cotswolds. With the help of her friend, decorator Scott Maddux, she has enhanced the house with a slightly unusual palette, which is no surprise as Jacquie’s real love is painting. She has a studio in a converted farm building where she works on her vibrant, expressive still lifes. Furnishings are equally various and include a sofa is upholstered in a Lelièvre stripe in the main bedroom, inherited antiques, junk-shop finds and a selection of paintings. These range from eighteenth-century landscapes to works by living artists including Barbara Stuart and Ken Howard. Jacquie’s eye ensures a harmonious composition.

Patterns are a recurring theme in Tarquin and Isobel Bilgen’s house; they beautifully match the beams that line the wall in their bedroom. Joss Graham is a good port of call for unusual fabrics; their embroidered horse cover from Uzbekistan (£2,800) dates from about 1900 and would work well as a bedhead. Similarly, an 18th-century French quilt from Katharine Pole (£1,850) is a close match to the Bilgen’s bedcover, made with fabric from Bennison.

Try incorporating bright florals into a girl’s bedroom scheme. Here, a combination of mismatching pinks and reds featuring in wallpaper, curtains and soft furnishings create a cohesive but informal look.

This bedroom resides in a period home with high ceilings, classically inspired mouldings and beautiful parquet flooring. As if that isn’t enough, it’s filled with a mixture of mid-century furniture and lighting, breathtaking art and a sophisticated and restrained colour palette. For me it is the embodiment of ‘timelessness’. It will look as good in ten or twenty years time, just as it wouldn’t have looked out of place thirty years ago. It’s also impossible to tell if the owner is male of female. Another sign of simple good taste. And yet, it’s no museum piece, and has all the attributes of a comfortable and restorative bedroom. The pillows are and smooth. There’s an extra wool blanket to ward off winter chills. There’s a warm rug for bare feet, and the reading lights are positioned just where they are most effective. There’s even candles handy for when the mood dictates. If I was to add anything, it might be a padded headboard, but then the artwork wouldn’t be centre stage. That’s another word for this room. Considered. Image credit

Jorge Almada and Anne-Marie Midy, the husband-wife duo behind design company Casamidy, aren’t afraid to mix things up in their home. The boys’ bedroom features a mix of leather headboards, maps, vintage airplanes and Marimekko Unikko print cushions.

Like many a family home, there are conflicting tastes present in the home of Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada, furniture designers and owners of Casamidy. For starters, the two prefer different materials – Anne-Marie likes metal, while Jorge loves leather – but the two have created a home with a uniformity of spirit while still reflecting their personal tastes. In the master bedroom, the hand forged iron ‘Diego bed’ by Anne-Marie takes centre-stage.

‘We needed somewhere we could live and work, with undeveloped buildings in which we could photograph catalogues, and with land for animals and a potential for a garden,’ says Matthew. They found the rundown farmhouse, Ham Court, which had once been the gatehouse to Bampton Castle. The property, on the edge of Bampton village and surrounded by 30 acres of land, provided them with an irresistible opportunity to breathe romance back into a series of neglected and derelict buildings.

Colour and pattern both enliven and define this family home. The graphic red and white Vivienne Westwood wallpaper in the nursery is far more diverting than any mobile. ‘Small children seem absolutely riveted by it,’ says the home’s owner, interior designer Bunny Turner of Turner Pocock.

My belief is that a bedroom should be clean and simple. We spend so much time in our bedrooms trying to unwind from the day. That’s why we should create a serene space for ourselves. This bedroom is both serene and cool. The black and white palette proves that you don’t have to have a lot of colour to stand out. Image credit

im a teenager, and for me i personally like alot of these designs, there not all stereotypical. but it does seem like an old woman has made them and she doesnt really know what teenagers like. so maybe she should get some input from real teenagers

One Reply to “shared room decor easy crafts for teenage girls”

  1. As a designer, there is nothing more important when telling the story of a shared space, then showing BOTH personalities of a room. It’s OK to break the rules. Symmetry isn’t always best. Meaning, and Intention on the other hand, is what great design is all about. It’s what I have built my entire Design Business on. Image credit
    Four bunk beds line a wall of the kids’ room in this stone house in Luberon. The paired back design of the house is made playful here with polka-dot walls (and matching bed linen), colourful soft toys and a tiger rug.
    Teen bedroom ideas should include functions specific to their age, as well as look great. While adults prefer a space that’s calm and understated, teens appreciate vibrant, high energy rooms. Keep the following teen bedroom ideas in mind.

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