girly bedrooms for adults +white and peachy bedroom for teenage girls

‘The whole time we were working on this house our aim was for things not to match too much,’ says designer David Bentheim of this scheme. Juxtaposing the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, David copied original paneling that remained in an upstairs room, and installed a screen covered in de Gournay fabric behind the thoroughly modern, metal four-poster bed. Concealed within the bespoke white chest at the bed’s foot is a flat-screen television, which is raised and lowered using remote control.

The key to creating a cosy space? Three words: layering, layering, layering. Whether it’s pattern, colour or texture (all three is even better) more is more. To keep it from looking messy, make sure to repeat colours throughout the room and ensure there’s plenty of solid colour to break up the scheme.

The bedroom in this hotel designer’s west London home features a portrait of the owner, aged 13 by the artist Primo Potenza, which hangs above a mahogany table. Beside it stands a 1930s découpage screen by the surrealist painter and theatrical designer Leonor Fini.

‘We drove the neighbours mad,’ says Jos White, talking about the three-year renovation of the family’s town house on one of the most desirable streets in Manhattan’s West Village. After extending, gutting and completely renovating their six-storey town house to create open-plan interiors tailored for family living. The house is an enchanting mix of inimate and open plan – the bedroom is no exception. It has a neutral palette accented by a nineteenth-century trunk from Hilary Batstone reupholstered in pink.

A large lattice design cotton dhurrie, ikat print cushions, headboard and curtains, rattan furniture and of course a voile draped canopy; if you’re thinking of a chic colonial theme, make OKA your first stop.

Designer Hugh Leslie has not only created a simply chic scheme of primary colours and graphic prints, but a cosy wrap around headboard ensures there’ll be no danger of little ones going bump in the night.

I love this bedroom for a number of reasons: it just looks so calm, relaxing and welcoming. It belongs to Netherlands-based interior stylist and journalist Holly Marder, who has a fab blog called Avenue Lifestyle. When you see the before images you will realise just how successful this bedroom makeover has been. Before it was dark and decorated in a garish purple and orange, but Holly has transformed it into a calm retreat by painting the floorboards and walls white. I like how the design is asymmetrical, there’s two different bedside tables, two different lamps, and a cluster of framed pictures on just one side, but it still really works, you don’t have to be too rigid and use the same thing on each side, especially when there are two different people in the bed, with two different personalities! Image credit

Your first impulse might be to think of the sloped ceiling and cramped space of an attic bedroom as a minus, but instead, embrace it as a plus. When the bed is piled high with quilts, pillows, and shams, and surrounded by simple, yet lovely furnishings as in the adorable country bedroom shown here, the sloped ceiling and limited square footage simply add to the cozy vibe.  

But you can create a dedicated dressing area in a small bedroom, too. Use a decorative dressing screen to separate off one corner of the room, keeping a clothes rail behind it, as well as your dressing table if space allows.

When designing a bedroom, the most obvious place to start is with the bed. After all, without a good bed, it’s difficult to get a good night’s sleep. Make sure you choose the right size bed for the size of your bedroom. A super king size bed will dominate a small bedroom, making it difficult to move around the space or fit in any other bedroom furniture, while a standard double bed might look a bit lost in a large bedroom. Measure your bedroom, and make sure the bed you choose will allow for at least 70cm of circulation space around the sides and end of the bed.

There’s no denying that it’s the wallpaper that makes this room. The pretty, ditzy print used to paper the whole room is combined with classic white furniture and a pale cream carpet to ensure the overall scheme is not too busy.

One of the guest bedroom at Bowood House in Wiltshire has walls covered in Colefax & Fowler’s ‘Bowood’ design – a pattern named after this house with interiors by John Fowler. The same pattern features on the bed valance, headboard, curtains and chair upholstery.

A mezzanine bedroom is the ideal solution for a small space, especially if you fit in a built-in wardrobe behind the bed. But designer Maurizio Pellizzoni had to jump through several hoops to get planning permission for staircase, which links the mezzanine bedroom to the sitting room. First the staircase had to be craned in, then the council had to close the street while giant glass panels for the bedroom were hoisted up into place. Maurizio refers to this project, done for his friend Andrew Daniell in London’s Shoreditch, as the James Bond flat, because of its technology and slick looks. It’s a bachelor pad, but the striped blanket adds a soft splash of colour in an otherwise monochromatic scheme (find a similar one from Welsh weavers Melin Tregwynt, £95 at John Lewis).

The neat attic bedroom of designer Hugh Leslie’s Chelsea studio is partially clad in horizontal tongue-and-groove boarding. This is a good trick to visually widen a small room. Try the Georgian range from The English Panelling Company, which would create a similar effect.

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WALLS ‘Roman Emperor Intaglio Cases’, by Bridie Hall, £455 each, from Pentreath & Hall. FURNITURE Ebonised wood George III-style dining chair, £1,800 a pair, from Guinevere. ‘Courtesan’ lacquered pine four-poster bed, by Pedro da Costa Felgueiras, £9,250 excluding mattress, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Spear Trophy’ cast-iron table, £5,400, from Cox London. Nineteenth-century painted-wood and velvet stool, £5,900, from Rose Uniacke. ACCESSORIES ‘A4 Bookcloth Boxfile’ (pink), £28.50, from Pentreath & Hall. Silk-covered notebook (aqua), by Shepherds Bookbinders, £75, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Vienna’ (flamenco) bed curtain fabric, cotton velvet, £170 a metre, from de Le Cuona. Linen bedding, from £48 for a pillowcase, from Larusi. Velvet cushions, £65 each, from Kirsten Hecktermann. Cashmere throw (antique gold), by Begg & Co, £695; velvet ‘End of Bed Quilt’ (slate), by Niki Jones, £199; both from The Conran Shop. ‘Column’ brass and glass lamp base (pink), £450; ‘Orange Flame’ silk lampshade, by Melodi Horne, £310; both from Pentreath & Hall. ‘Jour’ glass, by Inga Sempé (aqua), £30 a pair, from Nude. Chinese oxblood-glazed porcelain ginger jar (used as vase), £550, from Guinevere.

In the main bedroom in Hannah Cecil Gurney’s London flat has hand-painted silk cushions and a Burmese lamp pick up on the green in the ‘Badminton’ wallpaper by de Gournay, the wallpaper company her father founded in 1986.

Blogger Rachel Denbow’s kids’ room is proof that you don’t need matching beds or bedding in a shared room. An eclectic mix of furniture (particularly when as eye-catching as this large display board) can be equally as stylish.

The furniture was found at Swoon Editions, including the low, mid-century modern rosewood media unit and bedside table. The bedding was bought from Anthropologie and the lighting from Urban Cottage Industries.

When Rita arrived, she immediately found the interior plan verging on stark. The owner had warned her that she did not want pattern, but Rita thought this was negotiable. To soften up this bedroom, with its grey faux panelling, she upholstered the bed in a delicate two-tone Italian fabric by Idarica Gazzoni. The pattern is then repeated on a sheer window blind.

While modern and luxurious design ideas often tell you that you need to have a sitting area, small office, or a king size bed in your bedroom, don’t forget that a bedroom’s main function is to be a place to rest and recharge. And you don’t much to create a beautiful space to do so.

It’s hard to put your finger on what is so special about Ett Hem, a 12-room hotel in the embassy quarter of Stockholm. Ett Hem translates as ‘a home’, and it feels as though it has been lived in for ages, even though it only opened in 2012 – everything is in just the right place and gives the impression of being brand new, though ‘new’ here means in great condition rather than fresh out of the box. It is as if, simultaneously, the house has been repainted, the curtains laundered, the original furniture recently returned from the upholsterers, the bookshelves reordered, the plants recently pruned – the way most of us would like our own homes, if only we could find the time. Interior designer Ilse Crawford was responsible for the look. The wall cabinet in the kitchen was designed by Studioilse, and the company also sourced many antiques, including chandeliers lit by real candles.

The lovely Pickwell Manor in North Devon has given us some serious interiors inspiration: a grand sleigh bed, heavy dark wood combined with antique pale green and floral details. It’s traditional in the best possible way.

This bedroom resides in a period home with high ceilings, classically inspired mouldings and beautiful parquet flooring. As if that isn’t enough, it’s filled with a mixture of mid-century furniture and lighting, breathtaking art and a sophisticated and restrained colour palette. For me it is the embodiment of ‘timelessness’. It will look as good in ten or twenty years time, just as it wouldn’t have looked out of place thirty years ago. It’s also impossible to tell if the owner is male of female. Another sign of simple good taste. And yet, it’s no museum piece, and has all the attributes of a comfortable and restorative bedroom. The pillows are plump and smooth. There’s an extra wool blanket to ward off winter chills. There’s a warm rug for bare feet, and the reading lights are positioned just where they are most effective. There’s even candles handy for when the mood dictates. If I was to add anything, it might be a padded headboard, but then the artwork wouldn’t be centre stage. That’s another word for this room. Considered. Image credit

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