girls pottery barn bedroom -discount dresser sets

Maria Speake of Retrouvius relaid the ‘slightly unimaginative’ oak flooring of this home to transform the basement into a cheerful playroom for the kids. The mix of mid-century influences with bright colour is proof that grown-up tastes can still be child friendly.

There are places where a teen can express themselves unabashedly. The bedroom is the top choice. The beauty of being a teenager is that the world is their oyster. Their favorite things are diverse and sometimes discordant, but with some planning, all ideas can tie together beautifully.

Crete a truly multi-purpose room that will keep the kids entertained for hours. Our favourite part? The bright yellow painted floor and matching lampshades – because a room like this should be colourful and fun.

While adults prefer a space that’s calm and understated, teens appreciate vibrantly colored, high energy rooms. The wall is the biggest area you can work with in a bedroom. Some of the best teen bedroom ideas involve the walls. Here are our favorite:

Sofa beds don’t have to be drab. Spruce up your spare room with some neon-piped bedding, and add a geometric rug and lime green accessories for a scheme that will be uber smart whether you have guests or not.

These colourful, original and beautifully illustrated large wall stickers come with all your favourite characters and images on one sheet. These stickers can also be used on furniture, windows, mirror…

Coloured lights are always a cute addition to a kids’ room. This display of ball lights strung around a set of white painted ladders is the perfect way to illuminate a corner and create a stylish feature at the same time.

When decorating a tween girl’s room, don’t be afraid to pack it with pattern. Introduce different prints by layering patterns similar in color yet different in scale. An excellent rule of thumb is to stick with one large-, one medium- and one small-scale pattern. This will ensure the layered look appears balanced rather than busy.

There is no reason at all that a small bedroom – even a really tiny bedroom – can’t be every bit as gorgeous, relaxing, and just plain full of personality as a much larger space. (As proof, check out the elegant bedroom from Laura Stein Interiors shown here.) The trick to creating a lovely bedroom when square footage is limited is to make smart use of the space you do have, keep furnishings scaled to the room, and most of all, not be afraid to show off your decorating chops.

Kids’ rooms can also help the kids develop and learn. InteriorHolic offers various decorating ideas for kids’ rooms that are not only beautiful but also beneficial and interesting not only for adults but also for kids themselves.

Tasked with reconciling twenty-first century living with the Victorian proportions of the terrace house, the interior designer reconfigured the ground floor and linked the spaces with modern textures and pristine finishes.

Richard Taylor and Rick Englert have built a Jacobean-style manor at Whithurst Park in Sussex. It took a year to get planning permission and two more to build. The result bears some of the signatures of the prodigy houses built in the era, such as Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire and Hatfield House in Hertfordshire. This spare bedroom on the second floor has a four-poster canopy bed and moulded fireplace in keeping with the manor’s Jacobean look.

A pink floral bedroom makes an elegant scheme in this neoclassical pavilion Bradwell Lodge. It is aptly named the ‘Pink Room’. A bold Bernard Thorp ‘Brimble’ fabric has been used on the walls, bed and blind, adding character and playfulness. The curtain over the bed adds height, and gives the room a cosy den-like feel. Designed as a guest room, we think the ideas could easily be transferred to a child’s bedroom.

FURNITURE Woven-seagrass headboard, ‘Brian’, 153 x 204 x 11cm, £2,900, from Paolo Moschino for Nicholas Haslam. Beech and glass side table, ‘Pressed Wood’, by Johannes Hemann, 55 x 50cm diameter, £1,500, from Mint.

Light green walls and a headboard in Colefax & Fowler’s ‘Evesham’ give this bedroom designed by Caroline Harrowby a fresh, floral look. Its eclectic style is made elegant with pretty curtains and a painted dressing table from the owners’ previous home.

A bespoke bed can add so much character to a room. This clever design begins as a cot but can become a small bed. Make it the star attraction with a feature mirror hung above it, bold bedding and a frame of twinkling fairy lights.

Think outside the box (or four walls) when it comes to paint colours for your bedroom. A rich forest green would normally be seen in a living room or dining room, but it adds a grown-up glamour to a bedroom.

Virginia White’s harmoniously diverse decoration of Lucy Turvill’s award-winning newbuild in Suffolk includes this spare room. Blinds made in a Florence Broadhurst fabric dress the narrow windows. It makes a colourful contrast with the neutral walls and flooring, including a red side table by Virginia White. A beautiful tapestry blanket from Blodwen lies across the bed.

When done right, black wall paint can make a chic statement in your sleep space. The trick? Paint one wall black and leave the others a bright white, then fill your room with colorful decor in fun patterns and textures.

There’s no denying that many little girls love all things pink, but that doesn’t mean a girl’s room has to look like a bubblegum factory. The bedroom from Steele Street Studios shown here demonstrates how well neutrals can work in a girl’s bedroom. The wonderful lighting fixture, fun pennant banner, and polka dot bedding add just enough whimsy to the space, yet the overall look is rather sophisticated. 

This small bedroom has dark green walls in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Olive’ paint. The single divan bed base is furnished with a ‘Casati’ headboard from Ensemblier London upholstered in ‘Faded Monochrome Teal Roses’ from Bennison. A limed wood antique commode is used as a bedside table, topped with a pile of books and simple glass vase filled with fresh flowers.

The owner loves the spare aesthetic of the bamboo. ‘It is not overwhelming, just a very simple and pure design, not trying to impress, nestled in the leaves, just hanging on the cliff.’ The house was designed by Veere Grenney.

If we were to have a house in the Hamptons this is how we imagine it would be decorated, but let’s face it, the combination of wall cladding, print bedding and a picture wall of pretty illustrations would look good anywhere.

Situated between Marrakesh and the Atlas Mountains, the holiday home of Colefax & Fowler’s Trudi Ballard, is decorated in a combination of English country-house style and traditional Moroccan elements. The site of the house is perfect: down a dirt track or two and into an olive grove, where the house seems almost part of the landscape. At the end of a gravel path is a studded wooden door leading to a shaded walk and then a cool, airy hall through french windows. This bedroom has a pretty delft-blue palette, with an Indian cotton bedspread and plates above the chimneypiece from Fez.

If the paste wall damp, aging or just brush the paint, paste may cause the stickers off automatically, or can cause peeling walls, can use a hair dryer hot air drying paint or wall can wait for a peri…

When it comes to bunk beds for kids, three words: versatility, versatility, versatility. This stylish bed works as a traditional bunk, or easily separates into a loft bed with a twin bed underneath (or an ‘I shaped’ bunk bed) – perfect for awkward or small spaces.

Creating a cosy play area in the corner of the room is easy. All that’s needed is a heavy pile rug and plenty of cushions – we love the mix of neutrals and brights here. The modular shelving and lighting further delineate the area from the rest of the room.

WALL Paint, ‘Hot Earth’, £42.50 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Paint & Paper Library. Curtains, ‘Reeds’ (green/blue/white), by Alexandra Palmowski for Virginia White Collection, linen, £125 a metre, from Redloh House Fabrics. Framed print, Figgy, by Kate Boxer, 45.5 x 63cm, £590, from Giovanna Ticciati.

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