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FURNITURE Beech-framed, linen-covered bed, ‘Mitford’, 140 x 200 x 150cm, £5,987.50, from Ensemblier London. Stool, ‘Pill’, 46 x 40cm diameter, £450, from de Le Cuona; covered in ‘Lasso’, by Vincent Darré, cotton, £124.80 a metre, from Pierre Frey.

With a wall-length desk and copious storage space, this teen bedroom is both stylish and totally functional. Accent pieces in soft primary colors bring cheery life to the classic white walls and muted carpet.

A sense of timelessness combined with simplicity and sophistication characterises Arnaud Zannier’s collection of hotels, as well as his shoe business. It is a design ethos reflected in his family home near Ghent. Refined and relaxed, the home echews trneds and adopts classic style instead. Exposed wooden beams, full of knots and character, envelop the room and the bed, giving it a cosy cabin feel.

Kids’ bedroom ideas: go big, or go home we say. Decorating a kids’ room doesn’t mean you have to scrimp on style. In fact, it opens up a whole new world of exciting design possibilities, even for small room ideas. It’s the perfect excuse to be as bold, brave or magical as you want. Whether it’s a girls’ room, a boys’ bedroom or nursery, we’ve found some amazing children’s bedroom ideas to steal, from furniture to accessories like kids’ wallpaper. Let the fun begin…

Born in America, interior designer Henri Fitzwilliam-Lay started her working life in New York, cutting her visual teeth as a fashion stylist on Elle magazine, before becoming art director for some of Manhattan’s most celebrated retailers, including Bergdorf Goodman and Bloomingdale’s. Her stylist’s eye has remained one of her undoubted assets, giving her the confidence to compose sophisticated medleys of pattern, colour and texture. ‘In this house, we definitely went maximalist,’ she says. ‘We used layer upon layer.’ The wallpapers are ‘Clouds Sonic’ by Aimée Wilder and ‘Tile’ by Cole & Son, while the ‘Libra’ zodiac cushion is from Jonathan Adler.

Why not perk up your bedroom with a simple bed canopy. This curtain was created with two fabrics from Fermoie and edged with rufflette. The top of the canopy is covered with a simple frame edged with a scallop trim.

Let’s face it, teenagers and orderly rooms are a rare combination. Messy rooms seem to be a teenager’s rite of passage. Good storage options will be the best feature they didn’t think they needed but will appreciate.

This design scheme is all about sumputous colour and texture. Soft pinks and rich raspberry reds are combined with a heavy piled rug, plentiful cushions and throws, plus a drape above the bed. The result is glamorous and very inviting.

What a view! Admittedly, only a lucky few can call an ocean front bedroom their own. However, this bedroom is not just about the view. In my opinion it perfectly interprets what I call the key elements of successful bedroom design: clean lines and uncluttered surfaces in combination with warm materials, rich textures and soothing colours. Add a few pools of light and you got yourself the perfect recipe for a cosy haven of relaxation. In this particular bedroom they took it a further notch up by adding the element of fire, creating a truly harmonious environment and perfect balance. Image credit

Relocating to Oxford after 15 years in Japan and Hong Kong, the owners of this Victorian house put together a team of experts to create a mostly open-plan layout full of intriguing design details. Despite the architectural strength, the house unfolds slowly, allowing the eye to pick up intricate details and layered textures as you wander through. It is a scheme that strikes the balance between formal and family living in the brief to American interior designer Susan Ferrier of McAlpine. The main bedroom is decorated in a muted neutral scheme.

I agree that these rooms are unrealistic and too perfect. I’m currently trying to re-decorate my room and none of the above helpful in providing even the slightest inspiration. Most of them are twice the size of my room; and alot of the furniture just wouldn’t fit. If anyone has pictures of rooms that are smaller and something do-able, let me know.

The wrought iron bed, the clustered display of fresh flowers, the vintage print textiles (we love the mustard yellow and red floral quilt), religious iconography above the bed…We have a feeling there’s a confident and extremely cool designer behind this bedroom.

In this modern city flat that has been transformed from a stark new-build to a characterful home, the use of a natural palette full of texture and earthy tones continues in this bedroom, creating a calm and peaceful space.

Children’s bedrooms should be fun, bold and playful. As a designer, I love to let my imagination run wild when working with children’s bedrooms. With a little inventiveness you can create the most wonderful spaces with unusual paint effects and bespoke joinery. Use MDF to create a built in bed in the shape of a house or teepee, section off a corner for a reading area in the shape of a castle or make the most of a tall ceiling with a mezzanine, as in the image above. Children love to have their own special space and creating a reading nook or hiding space allows them to escape into their own magical world. In the past I have designed rooms with tented ceilings, trampoline floors and a bed made from silver birch branches decorated with fairy lights. Go on – have some fun! Image Credit

Ok.. these ideas are cool. BUT im 14 and i personally would not pick any of these for my room. Bold colors like these are going to go out of style. They seem cold and bare. The rooms are too big. A normal room would be around 11×12. I personally will not want bold colors, i wouldn’t want them because say when im 17 i dont want people to think im imature. A room should yes desribe a persons personallity but a room should transition easily from young teen to older teen. And people dont want to redo their room every year or two…sorry for being so harsh.

This Oxfordshire cottage is a charming mix of old and new. Emma Burns of Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler worked with the existing features of each room to breathe new life into them. The bedroom’s orange velvet curtains (out of shot) were an original fixture, though Emma had them remade and hung from an antique pole to match the quilt (which she sourced from Colefax and Fowler Antiques). The wallpaper is ‘Alice’ by George Spencer, while Oka is a good match for the embroidered cushion covers.

Flea market furniture is a great fit for a tween girl’s room due to its affordability and timeless appeal. This Victorian dresser was picked up for $50, updated with two coats of glossy plum paint, then given a touch of whimsy with satin brass house numbers used as drawer pulls.

The stuff of dreams. Author and designer Paul Golding spent seven years restoring this this exquisite 18th century palazzo in Malta. ‘I couldn’t resist its romantic decay!’ Built by the distinguished Maltese architect Francesco Sammut, the bedroom is stenciled with a pattern copied from a Carmelite convent in Medina. The chandelier is from Julian Chichester, while the magnificent gesso and silver gilt bed and table were commissioned from Brighton-based furniture maker Lincoln Cato.

Relocating to Oxford after 15 years in Japan and Hong Kong, the owners of this Victorian house put together a team of experts to create a mostly open-plan layout, full of intriguing design details. The spare children’s room on the third floor has specially made built-in bunks.

For those who live in small spaces or are short on storage, this chic little wall-hanging from Ikea will keep all your bedside paraphernalia perfectly in place. Or, if you’re feeling particularly crafty you could make your own.

WALLS ‘Roman Emperor Intaglio Cases’, by Bridie Hall, £455 each, from Pentreath & Hall. FURNITURE Ebonised wood George III-style dining chair, £1,800 a pair, from Guinevere. ‘Courtesan’ lacquered pine four-poster bed, by Pedro da Costa Felgueiras, £9,250 excluding mattress, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Spear Trophy’ cast-iron table, £5,400, from Cox London. Nineteenth-century painted-wood and velvet stool, £5,900, from Rose Uniacke. ACCESSORIES ‘A4 Bookcloth Boxfile’ (pink), £28.50, from Pentreath & Hall. Silk-covered notebook (aqua), by Shepherds Bookbinders, £75, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Vienna’ (flamenco) bed curtain fabric, cotton velvet, £170 a metre, from de Le Cuona. Linen bedding, from £48 for a pillowcase, from Larusi. Velvet cushions, £65 each, from Kirsten Hecktermann. Cashmere throw (antique gold), by Begg & Co, £695; velvet ‘End of Bed Quilt’ (slate), by Niki Jones, £199; both from The Conran Shop. ‘Column’ brass and glass lamp base (pink), £450; ‘Orange Flame’ silk lampshade, by Melodi Horne, £310; both from Pentreath & Hall. ‘Jour’ glass, by Inga Sempé (aqua), £30 a pair, from Nude. Chinese oxblood-glazed porcelain ginger jar (used as vase), £550, from Guinevere.

The interior designer behind this West London home was Ebba Thott. In the spare room a steel four poster bed, a modern take on a timeless classic, sits comfortably alongside a custom-coloured blue and white chintz by Marthe Armitage. The bedcover is by Holland & Sherry through Lelièvre in Paris.

This year we decided to give our bedroom a mini makeover. Sometimes a theme wall can do the trick as is the case here where Farrow & Ball’s Dix Blue was used as the background. The room feels light and airy and I won’t deny it, feminine too. The tall headboard of the upholstered bed and the brass accessories give it a luxurious look that is always a pleasure to come back to.

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