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The children’s bedrooms in Keith McNally’s Notting Hill home allow for storage and organisation – as well as charming touches – like this Toadstool lamp, £55 at White Rabbit England. The East Coast tongue-and-groove panelling and plaster walls aren’t restricted to the kids’ spaces, they’re a theme throughout all of the property (see how he achieved the aged look here).

New England chic pervades the upstairs of restaurant owner Keith McNally’s Notting Hill house. Reclaimed floorboards are in the main bedroom, along with an antique iron hospital-style bedstead. Navajo blankets in rich shades of red are draped over the sofas and beds throughout the house. The effect is stylish and relaxed. If you are on the lookout for something similar, Sacha Knight’s new venture, Knight Mills, does a similar look. Influenced by American Indian designs, her handwoven cotton rugs measure 180 x 120cm and cost £390.

Scandinavian style isn’t just whites and woods – quirky prints and playful colour are Nordic hallmarks. (Have you seen Marimekko?). Our top tip? Keep clutter to a minimum and stick to clashing prints in similar colours. Scandi-licious.

In this kids’ bedroom, the white walls, ceiling, carpet and bedding are brought to life with blinds, headboards and a colourful rug. All of the patterns are different, introducing an element of fun to the minimal room. It is the perfect design for a children’s bedroom in a holiday home.

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Coloured lights are always a cute addition to a kids’ room. This display of ball lights strung around a set of white painted ladders is the perfect way to illuminate a corner and create a stylish feature at the same time.

Forget stars and stripes, it’s all stars and spots in Zara Home’s new kids’ range. Your little ones won’t be growing out of this fun black, white and red scheme anytime soon. In fact, we Kind of want it in our rooms.

The room is not dull, however, thanks to a patterned headboard and exposed beams, which add interest to the space. As with many of the fabrics, cushions and rugs in her Somerset house, Sophie Hale went to Robert Kime for the floral fabric on the headboard. The ‘Susani Yellow’ linen is printed to resemble needlework and looks particularly pretty against the unpainted beams and neutral walls. It costs £210 a metre.

The key to successful children’s bedroom design is clever storage. Make storage practical, accessible and easy to use, so that children have a place where everything goes. Encourage children to have an input into the colour scheme or theme, if they buy into the idea of the room from the start and have a hand in how it is planned and arranged, then they are more likely to take pride in keeping it organised and tidy. Baskets, trays, cupboards with doors and drawers are all good options. If you have the luxury of space then try to keep storage to the outer edges of the room so that children have a clearly identifiable place in which to play. Room to play in a free and unstructured way allows children to be more imaginative in their learning. Image Credit

Taking on the conversion of a disused chapel in Somerset, artist Jonathan Delafield Cook, illustrator Laura Stoddart and their two children (11 and 13 years old) have made the smooth transition from incomers to long-term residents. In this bedroom a simple storage wall has been filled with coloured boxes that match the rainbow pom poms at the window. A sweet mid-century desk for home work sits in front of the window.

Kids’ rooms | Country bedrooms | Modern bedrooms | Small bedrooms | Attic rooms | Guest bedrooms | Headboard ideas | Wardrobes and bedroom storage | How to decorate a 17m² studio apartment | The art of designing a small room | How to get organised

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