girls decor in bedroom +light purple bedroom for teenage girls

Choose different shades of white and cream as a base colour for a girl’s bedroom. You can then accessorise with shots of colour. Then, as your child grows, the style of the room can be easily changed.

Relocating to Oxford after 15 years in Japan and Hong Kong, the owners of this Victorian house put together a team of experts to create a mostly open-plan layout, full of intriguing design details. The spare children’s room on the third floor has specially made built-in bunks.

I have a thing for fairytales and so I always seek for that ‘happily ever after’ look in my home. With its tactile textures, warming beige tones and flowing covers, this bedroom is the epitome of a bed that’s fit for a princess and her prince – or me and my fiancé. It’s clear that the main focus of the room is the bed itself and so, as I believe that you can never have enough scatter cushions either, this scene truly is my ideal bedroom.  

We’re having a bit of a love affair with yellow at the moment, but this has to be one of our favourite applications of the sunny hue: bright yellow shutters combined with a black and white scheme and a few yellow accessories to accent. Amazing.

Make tidying up more fun with pretty fabric storage boxes slotted into a white-painted unit. A large scale wall sticker picks up on the colours of the boxes to turn the storage area into a focal point.

If your little girl has a knack for geography, consider girl’s bedroom wallpaper that has an educational flair. In this globetrotter’s room, a map of the world takes up the entire accent wall. Here, she can plan her next big adventure or be inspired to pick up a few library books on the eastern hemisphere. Plan the bedding and textiles around the colors found in the global designs. 

We often think bold and bright when we think of kids’ bedrooms but softer hues can be calming. Pick three tonal hues like the blue, green and cream here and carry them through from wall paints to furniture and accessories.

Wallpaper tends to get a bad rap for making rooms look small and cluttered, but using the right style and technique does just the opposite. Add a bold wallpaper pattern to a focal wall, like your headboard wall.

An attic conversion is the perfect place for a kids’ bedroom. Children will love feeling like they have their own little den under the eaves and with clever, chuck-everything-in storage solutions, there’ll be plenty of space.

After visiting her friend Kathryn Ireland in France’s Tarn region, Anne Halsey bought a French farmhouse retreat there and enlisted the help of the decorator to create a relaxed space perfect for entertaining. This twin guest bedroom is decorated with a pastel pink colour scheme featuring white gauzy canopies, making for a pretty and sophisticated room that would be perfect as a girls’ bedroom.

I don’t know about you, but I find that having non-themed rooms in my home is essential to the ever-changing needs of family life. What’s more, themed rooms spells hotel. And do we want to live in a soulless hotel? Thought not. Ask yourself, as children grow out of their beds, share with a sibling or move rooms, could their ‘old’ room be adapted as a snug, study or dining room? The littlies’ needs change so much and so quickly in those first few years, it really makes sense to go for a scheme that is multi-purpose but, most importantly, timeless. Turn convention on its head and experiment. This Farrow & Ball wide stripe is supposed to be hung vertically but I couldn’t resist flipping it ninety degrees. For furniture, see what you can find in flea markets and slap a coat of paint over it, or rummage around in local auction houses. Brown furniture is still well-priced and besides, it is so much more fun for a child to be grabbing their clothes out of an old chest of drawers that has a story to tell, than an identikit piece, hot off the production lines from China. Although they will only appreciate it (there’s always hope) when they move out, taking their ‘old friend’ with them. The overall effect is much more personal and full of character, which is what makes a home your home.

Designer Kit Kemp is the queen of combining bold colour and pattern with a finesse that never looks overdone. In this room in the Ham Yard hotel deep blue walls are lifted by an upholstered gabled headboard and matching curtains. The polka dot print on the cushions is echoed in the chair, while the striped ottoman at the foot of the bed pulls in the white of the bedspread and balances the scheme.

Wow, interesting article. Maybe, this is of interest, I recently hired Furnishr to design my living room. I know, I could have designed my room by myself, but I actually liked the designs on their site. Pretty great service. They designed, delivered, and setup my new living room furniture and decor in less than a week. Check them out if you’re interested, http://www.furnishr.com/

From their first glimpse of this country house in Norfolk, its owners were captivated and, with the help of interior designer Veere Grenney, have put their stamp on it. In a glorious honeycomb of rooms for the youngest member of family, there are enough small beds for the most riotous of sleepovers. In this bedroom ‘Belvedere’ linen in ‘Straw’ by Veere Grenney Associates has been used on the walls and bed draperies. The delicate colour amplified by sunshine yellow blankets.

Decoration editor Gabby Deeming has played with the colours and textures of natural materials to a serenely simple, Eastern-inspired scheme for this bedroom. Of the cork used on the walls she says ‘There is a warmth and versatility to cork; the wallcovering can also be used as an upholstery fabric.’

Create a stronger design impact in your home by including your favourite elements in every room – including children’s rooms. This room mixes funky furnishings with a kids’ touch. DON’T MISS OUR KIDS ROOMS DESIGN GUIDE

Children play everywhere, and their imagination knows no boundaries. The task of parents is to organize space for the realization of these fantasies using discreet and unusual borders. See 6 simple ideas of play zones for kids

In a spare room at a Belgian art collector’s London home by Feddy van Zevenbergen, the headboard is covered in a Jane Shelton fabric. The panelling was too damaged to restore, so Freddy lined the walls with a dark herringbone cashmere, which contrasts with the pale Italian marble of the bathroom behind.

Bedding can make or break a space, especially in a tween girl’s room where anything too cute can be too juvenile and anything too highbrow can be too adult. Instead of traditional florals, add an updated touch to a tween girl’s bedscape with overscale botanical prints.

Light grey walls and a gallery wall above the bed – step inside the elegant bedroom of our location editor. Soft colours carefully combined with playful accessories add character to the space in Lavinia Bolton’s Chelsea flat – an object lesson in unassuming good taste, as well as testament to her own creativity and enterprise.

A lime green and blue colour scheme and a collection of characters, including a line up of sweet stuffed toys and a friendly whale rug, bring this room to life. This corner provides a perfect play spot with some smart storage boxes for kids to dig in and out of.

On paper, this room shouldn’t be lovely at all – tiny, with barely any room for even a bed, and crammed with bright colours and clashing patterns. But in reality, this space, which I shot for my book Home for Now, is actually one of my favourite bedrooms I’ve ever worked in. This gorgeous sea green hue breathes life into this bijou space, whilst ingenious storage ideas, such as using a wall-mounted telephone table instead of a bedside unit, and hanging storage pockets on the wall, make best use of the available space. It proves that if you have courage in your design convictions, you can make anything work, whatever the challenge. Image credit

The architectural style is late Georgian, with generous sash windows, deep eaves and a dash of Italianate villa, thanks to a balcony that sits above the drawing room bay, and a pair of triple-arched windows across the first floor of the south-west façade where terraced lawns drop away to woodland. This bedroom embodies the modest grandeur of English country-house style. The walls are in ‘Linen Stripe’ by Arthouse.

Wendy Nicholls of Colefax and Fowler has honed her personal and professional style in her London flat which is full of Victorian accents and unique accessories. Wendy’s bedroom has a softer palette, with an embroidered bedspread from Chelsea Textiles. Walls of pale mauveish grey show off the yellow silk of the four-poster’s simple, unlined curtains. Her shock revelation is that they were made from silk taken from the curtains in the yellow drawing room at Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler’s Brook Street building. That room, with its lacquered buttercup walls and three pairs of massive curtains hung about with passementerie, was a shrine to decorating, an emblem of their grandest classical style. Was it heresy to cut up its curtains? Wendy quickly assures that these were the last remnants of earlier pairs, which had fallen into shreds.

This modern bedroom styled by Gabby Deeming was inspired by traditional Japanese rooms with Shoji screens and includes a simple yet elegant futon bed on a platform base from Futon Company. Simple sliding screens have been constructed with pine batons and papered with ‘Sansui’ wallpaper from Zoffany, a pattern of soft mountains. A modern ensuite bathroom houses C P Hart’s ‘Stand’ bath, which is propped on a steel frame.

Okay, these bedrooms are nice and all but who really has rooms with a balcony and a full glass window wall and a giant skylight in their room? Not the average family. So maybe you should make more pratical ideas. You would have been of more help to the other people who also commented agreeing with me. And anyways most of these ideas were no where near anything that i’d think would be a teenage girl’s room. Most of them look like like lifeless hospital rooms. Just saying.

Give a simple four-poster bed a sweet update with girly curtains and bedding. Pink fabrics keep the scheme girly, while the off-white walls mean that it can be updated as the child grows. Opt for a trundle bed for extra space when friends come to stay, and display their favourite toys proudly in a white-painted shelving unit.

In this guest bedroom, I wanted to create a fresh, but calm atmosphere. I’m a big believer that “less is more”, so I kept the styling to the minimum. White walls and crisp black and white bed linen give an airy feel to the room. The photos on top of the bed add a splash of colour that I believe is needed in every room. Yet the colours are not too vibrant to break the tranquil atmosphere. Colour and wooden details soften the overall look and make the room more inviting. All in all, it’s a bedroom in very Scandinavian style: minimalist and relaxed, made for living. Image credit

A girls bedroom furniture is an essential component of the design. You can choose from a wide variety of furniture pieces that are specifically created for little girls or search for pieces that can be used when she is a teenager and adult. For example, a dresser with an attached mirror will look attractive in your daughters when she is young but will become useful as she matures into an adolescent and starts wearing makeup. Similarly a trundle bed will last for many years in a small girls room and provide an extra place for your daughter’s friends to sleep when she has slumber parties. It is also perfect for a shared girls room because it can be tucked away during the day to free up space in the room. Other small room design ideas that will save space try searching for pretty white bunk beds or a lofted bed which you can put a desk or dresser underneath. When she is older she can even put a futon underneath for a fun place to hang out with her friends.

Your daughter’s nightly homework assignments will grow right along with her. Every school-age child needs a desk for study time. The simple desk fronted by a large bulletin board shown here is the perfect spot to study. But what really makes this room special is the adorable wall décor – and it’s a snap to duplicate. Just fill in the space over the headboard with a colorful and wonderfully patterned wallpaper. It’s an easy DIY, and you’ll probably only need one roll of paper. 

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I love the way this black and gold room turned out. The best thing about this room was it was very affordable to decorate, as most of the decorations are from Gordmans, Hobby Lobby and the At Home Store and the bedding is from Target.

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wow well i really like the roonz and all but you people who dont u guyz are all haterz if ur gonna talk crap then talk crap stop sayin NO OFFENSE and if you cant afford any of the stuff sorry to say this but why u lookin on this website JUST SAYIN!!!!!!!!!!!

WALLS Patina and specialist colour-matching, £55 a square metre, by Elise Orrier. Similar eighteenth-century giltwood mirror, £575, from M Charpentier Antiques. ‘No 121’ bronze wall light, £2,900, from La Maison Charles. Rope and raffia wall light, by Audoux-Minet, £600 for a pair, from Atelier Vime. FURNITURE Wicker headboard, from £800; ‘Ollivier’ metal and rattan side table, £520; both from Atelier Vime. ACCESSORIES ‘Madrigal’ waterlily soap, by Claus Porto, £16, from Cologne & Cotton. ‘Bistrot’ nickel and ceramic soap dish, £297.60, from The Water Monopoly. ‘Malmaison’ silver tray, £1,253; and teaspoons, £50 each; all from Christofle. Similar silver coffee pot, £900, from Linden & Co. ‘Losanges’ porcelain teacups and saucers, £71.42 each, from Royal Limoges. Pillowcases and sheet, ‘Emilie’, by Nicole Fabre Designs, linen, £189 a metre, from Tissus d’Hélène. ‘Seraphine’ hand-embroidered kingsize cotton flat sheet, £175, from Cologne & Cotton. Eighteenth-century French linen cushions, £590 for a pair, from Katharine Pole. ‘Tarascon’ linen quilt with cotton filling, £550, from Christopher Moore.

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