girls bedroom pictures |elephant bedroom decor for girls

Jane Sacchi recounts the experiences of updating a twelfth-century tower in Florence, with her husband, architect Bruno Sacchi. ‘It took three years to transform it into an exceptional family home, during which period Bruno often wandered about with a hammer and chisel picking plaster off the walls to expose the frescoes.’

The artist owners of this London house called on interior designer Beata Heuman to create a family home full of fun, distinctive design and punchy colours. A highly original space, unapologetically theatrical and oozing energy. ‘The owners are both artists. They have quite wild tastes and they love strong colours,’ says Beata. This bedroom, decorated in different shades of blue, is given a lift by a mustard throw on the bed.

Decorating with multiple colours can be an intimidating task for even the most seasoned of designers. No matter how genuine our initial enthusiasm for venturing across to the other side of the paint chart, it is all too easy to get cold feet and talk ourselves out of being more courageous with colour, settling instead for safe, neutral schemes. Colour, however, shouldn’t be used exclusively to make a statement. Gabby Deeming set herself the challenge of creating four palettes from the Mylands paint range. Each palette is made up of four shades that would sit together harmoniously in a space, and work beautifully with textiles and wallpapers. The walls are painted in ‘Piccadilly’ and ‘Palmerston Pink’, £34.66 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, while the floor is in ‘Honest John’, £21.65 for 1 litre water-based eggshell, all from Mylands.

My favourite minimal bedroom. A tranquil but bright space, painted floor-to ceiling in white. All the texture is in the layering of the fabrics, the crumpled linen and the tactile woollen throw. A simple bedside table holds a few bedroom essentials, with an unobtrusive light above for reading and one stunning picture is the focal point. Perfection. Image credit

A contemporary blue wall paint, loud print bedding and some favourite records hung on the walls: it doesn’t take much to create a cool bedroom for a young teenager. You can throw the bike in too if you’re feeling generous!

An archway was built to frame French windows that allow light to pour into a teal-coloured bedroom full of Moroccan treasures in Vanessa Branson’s 28-bedroom Marrakech riad hotel El Fenn, where artwork inhabits every wall.

In this London house designed by Suzy Hoodless, the children’s rooms were kept graphic and simple; Suzy hates ‘cute’ decoration that they will quickly grow out of – she has used a Børge Mogensen cabinet as a changing table in her own home. So the only concession she made to the children’s ages was bright primary colour. In one of the rooms a custom-designed mural has been painted on the wardrobe door.

Jorge Almada and Anne-Marie Midy, the husband-wife duo behind design company Casamidy, aren’t afraid to mix things up in their home. The boys’ bedroom features a mix of leather headboards, maps, vintage airplanes and Marimekko Unikko print cushions.

When it comes to children’s decor, my eye is always drawn to white, airy rooms with playful details to add warmth and colour. Jenson’s gender neutral is a perfect example of this, with his sweet ladybug bedding and special wooden toys out on display. There’s space to let him play unrestricted, with stylish storage boxes to tidy away any clutter afterwards. It’s also a room that can easily grow with him for years to come. Whilst monochrome is the trend of the moment, it can be surprisingly tricky to get right. The key is to find a balance and you can do this by adding in more soft tones and textures such as wooden accents, a fun wallpaper or contrasting prints. Not only does it make the space more interesting, but it doesn’t restrict you to one overly coordinated look. Have fun with styling and sourcing your key pieces and it will shine through in your child’s room! Image Credit: Holly Nicholls from Jenson & Beau

Architect Jonathan Tuckey wanted to combine ‘twenty-first-century comforts with seventeenth-century character’ in this timber-lined chalet in this Swiss Alps, which he imaginatively modernised. Jonathan paired the idea of old and new in this first-floor bedroom with a pair of Fifties rosewood beds from Modernisticks and kept the original plywood walls and floorings, which compliments the subtle decoration of the rest of the chalet.

Once the basics are in place, decorating is where the fun begins. Choose a feature to be the focus of your room. That can be a beautifully upholstered headboard, a fancy mirror, a few indoor plants, or simple and clean white bedding combined with a fluffy rug.

The bedroom is a place when you should be able to relax, rest and sleep well. The space therefore should be simple, clean and uncluttered. Ban all the unnecessary items and focus on the essentials – comfy pillows, soft bedding, good light for reading, and small bedside table to keep your books and water carafe. Create a space where you can rest your eyes and calm your mind, and it means white walls and no busy patterns. I am drawn to this bedroom because of the colour palette – all in soft brown tones. There is a feeling of calm and the crumpled linen looks very inviting. The only decoration it needs is a single artwork on the wall. The beauty here is in simplicity. Image credit

Architect Francesca Oggioni wanted a new layout for her Grade II listed house in west London that would work as a family home, workspace and backdrop for her extensive art collection. She purchased her home with her Belgian husband, a hedge-fund manager, photographer and art collector. Their main bedroom has plenty of shelving and storage to maintain the sleek, clutter-free aesthetic of the house.

The gentle slope of the ceiling in this room in a water’s-edge cabin at Soho Farmhouse gives the space plenty of character despite the neutral decor. The metal bed frame is the only piece of non-wooden furniture, adding another texture to the room.

This room has a beautiful vintage/industrial style. A bedroom to me is a place to rest and to surround myself with calmness. This needs to be reflected in the decor. Nothing should draw too much attention. It needs to be laid back, full of natural materials, casual and cosy.

Create a stronger design impact in your home by including your favourite elements in every room – including children’s rooms. This room mixes funky furnishings with a kids’ touch. DON’T MISS OUR KIDS ROOMS DESIGN GUIDE

Love Scandinavian style? The combination of crisp whites and cheery colours lends itself well to a kids’ room. Start with white-washed floors and furnishings, then add bright pops of colour with cushions and bedding. Don’t forget quirky-yet-fun accents, like this hanging bird mobile.

Remember that storage doesn’t necessarily have to be in the bedroom. If you have a corridor near the room consider utilising that as a place to put wardrobes, as designer Philippa Thorpe has in this Chelsea house.

White on white is the perfect space for the perfect night’s sleep. Crisp white bed linen, with the softest of pillows and the lightest of duvets. Cosy throws to keep those toes warm in the colder months. Pure and simple paired back detailing to showcase the natural beauty of the walls and floor that frame the space you are in. Uncluttered and calm, a sanctuary from the hectic world outside. Image credit

When decorating a tween girl’s room, don’t be afraid to pack it with pattern. Introduce different prints by layering patterns similar in color yet different in scale. An excellent rule of thumb is to stick with one large-, one medium- and one small-scale pattern. This will ensure the layered look appears balanced rather than busy.

Brown, white, and beige colours give Sarah Stewart’s bedroom at her refurbished 1786 cottage in Herefordshire a pared-down feel, emphasized by minimalist light fixtures. Her raised bed is a unique way to give the room a fluid sense of space.

‘The basement is the real triumph of the house – it doesn’t feel subterranean,’ says Claire Spencer-Churchill, who shares the house with her husband Dominic and their two children Martha, four, and Ivor, two.

The canopy in this girl’s bedroom, designed by Studio Alidad, was intended to make it feel more ‘feminine and special’. The bespoke floral design on the headboard and silk fringe is repeated on the fabric wallcovering, while the ceiling and corona are hand-painted.

Take a decorating tip from Lisa Teague Studios, and create interest in your small room by placing your bed at a slight diagonal. It’s even better when a pretty folding screen takes the place of a traditional headboard; the screen acts as a focal point for the room, drawing the eye upwards to increase the visual size of the space. Another use for a folding screen in the bedroom is as a privacy barrier around the bed. This is especially good in a studio apartment, or in a shared children’s…MORE bedroom.

In the main bedroom of product designer Anthony Joseph – one half of kitchenware company Joseph & Joseph – mustard textiles were chosen to complement the walls painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Mole’s Breath’

I like most of them. They are right, they are quite unrealisitc. But these are options. Plus Sanydy’s right. They aren’t just for you. They’re for every girl out there. The girly one, the tomboy. the artsy, the jock, EVERYONE. So you may not like it, but that doesn’t mean there not good designs.They each have great color and beautiful peices that coordinate well with each other. The pictures are something that could be totally different! These weren’t meant to be copied exactly. Just to give you ideas and peices. And that’s coming from a thirteen year old girl aspiriring to be and interior designer.

Not a design scheme for the faint hearted but one that we rather love. The furniture may have a Louis XV feel but the introduction of hot pink and lime green accessories and the all-over lattice effect wallpaper keep it ultra contemporary.

The dream bedroom for teens, black comforter with large pink flowers on it and gold stars on the wall. Where did that comforter and sham set come from?? M daughter loves it and I cannot seem to find anything similar. Beautiful room!

Make moody hues more inviting by ensuring your furniture looks super cosy. Here, ultra-soft cotton, luxurious fabrics and a plethora of blankets make this room serenely restful. Bonus points for the squidgy-looking pillows. Ahh…

No matter what piques your daughter’s interest, she probably needs plenty of storage for her treasures. Take a cue from the kitchen for organization. Kitchen cabinetry works well in girl’s bedroom designs. Here, semicustom cabinets act as a built-in around the bed, and drawers beneath the bed take advantage of untapped storage space.

I love every ideas you have shared over here. The style and design were so perfect and very inspiring. I am so happy I stumbled on your blog because you inspire me a lot. I can apply ideas I learned on my next  home decorating ideas project. Thank you for sharing this wonderful post.

The main bedroom of this old fashioned Hampshire house has large sash windows that allow views out across the garden and parkland; the wallpaper is George Spencer’s Palm Stripe’ design, while the bed curtain is in ‘Bergama’ linen by Robert Kime.

Tasked with reinventing a conservative Park Avenue apartment, New York-based designer Sandra Nunnerley has created a modern, relaxed space that has an aura of calm. In the main bedroom, the headboard is in Holland & Sherry ‘Spectator’ fabric, with Mike and Doug Starn’s ‘Structure of Thought’ print hung above it; the doorway to the left leads seemlessly through to a dressing room to leave the main room uncluttered. Sandra describes the result as ‘timeless luxury and refinement’, without sacrificing a sense of modernity.

Windows in tween rooms are a great opportunity to experiment with design elements which may be considered too bold or risky for common areas of a home such as living rooms or entryways. Consider large-scale patterns in neutral colors such as black, white and gray. Should a tween girl grow tired of her wall color and decide to change the paint, the window coverings will most likely work well with the updated palette.

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