crafts for girls rooms _teenage girls bedroom set

‘I got it off Ebay for £200’ says designer Diana Sieff of the four-poster bed in the bedroom of her Oxfordshire home. ‘I like using big furniture in small spaces, because it gives the illusion that the room is bigger. Although I did have to take the finials off the bed posts, as they hit the ceiling.’ One of Diana’s trademarks is to forego curtains in favour of shutters. ‘I had them made,’ she explains, ‘which I prefer because they are minimal and less light-excluding.’ The walls are covered in – ‘Adams Eden’ by Lewis & Wood.

This bedroom in Shoreditch House by Soho House is decorated in a neutral and stylish scheme with red features. Panelling makes the space cosy; painted in light grey, it doesn’t shrink the already small space.

Playful shapes – such as this bed frame in the shape of a house – are a modern take on the traditional four-poster bed. As the furniture is neutral, add charming pops of colour with the bedding and accessories.

Choose different shades of white and cream as a base colour for a girl’s bedroom. You can then accessorise with shots of colour. Then, as your child grows, the style of the room can be easily changed.

I love the Scandi simplicity of this girl’s bedroom. Loft rooms are like a dream for most children – they are cosy, snug and a bit different. With this lovely white backdrop you can create a calm and uncluttered space – the mixture of white, pink and blue accessories make the room so modern. Current trends for girls’ bedrooms are veering away from the pink saturation approach of latter years, and moving towards something more creative and meaningful. You can decorate a room like this with slightly more nursery-like accessories to begin with and then up-style when your girl grows older. This can see your child through from baby, towards secondary school age – saving a fortune in decorating costs. On a final note, what’s not to love about the wonderful crepe lanterns and the cute lamb wall art?! Image Credit

Will Fisher and his wife Charlotte of Jamb have completely refashioned their eighteenth-century house in south east London, relaying the wooden antique floors, reproducing the cornicing and installing period chimneypieces and stonework. The couple have done a great deal to bring that much sought-after – but rarely achieved – country-house look to the mainstream aesthetic.

‘Scandinavians live for light. Inside Scandinavian houses it is summer all the time,’ says designer Lars Bolander in his book Scandinavian Design (Vendome Press). It is certainly true in his little 1800s farmhouse in Sweden. The home took a year to renovate, including breaking through the original chimney to create a fireplace in the main bedroom. The furniture is a mix of Swedish and English, while the walls are lined with ‘F124 Forget-me-not Spring in Pink’ from Chelsea Textiles.

As much as possible, owner Anne-Marie tried to match the wall colours to those that her grandmother had used, keeping the bedrooms the same subtle colours, but adding ‘ribbons’ of colour to outline the architecture and ‘dress the room’.

Bedrooms should be tranquil and relaxing! When I redecorated mine, I chose a very pale grey wall colour with matching bed linen and curtains! I hung my floor-length curtains high up on the wall, and to the sides of the window frames to create the illusion of height and larger windows. This maximises the light coming in to the room, and together with the white painted wooden floor, gives the room a calm and airy feel. I kept the decor fuss free, just adding different patterned textiles in the same colours for some visual interest, and warmed up the look by adding some copper accessories. A light chain and some industrial style cage lights either side of the bed gives a cosy glow at night and my bedtime reading supply (interior magazines) are kept handy by the bed and doubles up as a bedside table! Image credit

Light green walls and a headboard in Colefax & Fowler’s ‘Evesham’ give this bedroom designed by Caroline Harrowby a fresh, floral look. Its eclectic style is made elegant with pretty curtains and a painted dressing table from the owners’ previous home.

The gentle slope of the ceiling in this room in a water’s-edge cabin at Soho Farmhouse gives the space plenty of character despite the neutral decor. The metal bed frame is the only piece of non-wooden furniture, adding another texture to the room.

Diy Room Decor For GirlsGold Room DecorLittle Girls PlayroomKids Bedroom Ideas For Girls ToddlerGirls Room Wall DecorBaby And Toddler Shared RoomBoy And Girl Shared RoomGirls Pink Bedroom IdeasToddler Princess Room

It is hard to say how many times in my life I have heard the ‘no bed next to a window’ rule. It’s definitely more than a few. Fortunately, rules are made to be broken. If your bedroom is extraordinarily small, you might have limited options on where you place your bed. You can always find a way to put a bed in front of a window and make it look more awesome than awkward, and here we have one example. Thanks to the curtains which frame the window perfectly and the fact they go from wall to wall, the design achieves a luxurious and purposeful look. Symmetry is key here, as the bed lines up with the window in a pleasing, balanced way. The top of the headboard is perfectly in line with the window sill and is not obscuring the window. A calming palette of colours creates a cosy space with a seductive feel. Image credit

An attic conversion is the place for a kids’ bedroom. Children will love feeling like they have their own little den under the eaves and with clever, chuck-everything-in storage solutions, there’ll be plenty of space.

Wonderful ideas, and great tips. Beautiful decors. Wonder if you could share more ideas for tables for studying. I don’t like big tables I just would like to have a space where they can do their homework but don’t take up too much space. Thank you.

So glad you like the ideas! Sadly I couldn’t find the tutorial that went along with that idea, but here is a link to a similar project with instructions: http://17shadesofmade.wordpress.com/2013/11/13/diy1/ hope that helps!

The comfortable guest bedroom features a moss green headboard, with Victorian style cushions and bedspread. Their brief to Gavin Houghton was to make the house traditional and cosy, featuring the best of classic English interior decoration.

To vary solid-color walls, try this easy, do-it-yourself project. Mark out different sizes of squares on the wall with painter’s tape. Then fill in the shapes with three to four different colors. Here, bold raspberry, tangy orange, and sweet pink squares spruce up a peach background.

This is the guest bedroom at a client’s penthouse in the centre of Barcelona. I love the colour scheme and all the fabrics used. It feels like you’re on a holiday in a beautiful hotel when you’re in this bedroom. It has an en-suite with a double shower so that you can shower at the same time as your partner, I thought this would be romantic. The velvet, the suede, the silk, the divine fabrics and tones used in this bedroom are an entire world of calming, soothing, touchy feely goodness. It’s also a deluxe combination. To me It’s a winner. Image credit

The spare room in this Georgian town house in Ludlow designed by Caroline Harrowby is papered in ‘Alderney’ from Colefax and Fowler. This adds interest to the space, which is light and airy – a fitting style for a small bedroom.

It doesn’t take much to set an exotic style, so a small room is perfect for a global look like the Moroccan showstopper here. Just three elements – the silver pendants, the silver pouf, and the fantastic bed – are all it takes. If none of those are within your reach, consider adding an exotic throw pillow or two to your bed.

Two Designer’s Guild beds upholstered in ‘Brera’ linen furnish this small bedroom in the attic a Somerset country house. The calm turquoise and white scheme offers some colour to the room without making the small space feel too busy.

Something new and colourful is what I thought I’d do,’ says interior designer Gytha Nuttall of the decoration of her converted nineteenth-century schoolhouse in Battersea. ‘But as the project developed, slowly I returned to all the muddy colours I love best.’

Designer William Yeoward’s takeover of our June style pages, to celebrate the anniversary of his company, yielded a timeless scheme that celebrated his work past and present. In a room painted Farrow & Ball’s ‘Card Room Green’, an Eighteenth century screen from Hollyhock works in a similar manner to a mural. The bespoke tented cupboard was created by Clock House Furniture from William Yeoward at Designers Guild fabric. The chest of drawers and the bed are also of William’s design, with bedding from The Linen Works.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *