boy girl bedroom decorating ideas _girls bedroom voice recognition buzzer

How about a minimalist bedroom that will wish you sweet dreams? A bedroom that pleases your senses after a long and busy day. A space that is a balm for the soul of its residents, which creates a sense of sanctuary amid the hustle and bustle of everyday life. A Zen space with a subtle extravagant touch in the form of a marble wall which acts as a blank canvas for other features. A focal point in a form of a cosy bed upholstered with a nice, soft fabric enriched with two asymmetric lamps giving the space an usual and interesting look. There is a large walk-in wardrobe, to the right of the bed, allowing residents to keep the space nice and tidy – perhaps apart from a couple of great books laying around here and there. But who wouldn’t love to lay down on this bed with a good read? Image credit

Despite her classical aesthetic, Gytha has incorporated more modern touches in the flat. She opted against cornicing in favour of a cleaner finish and enhanced the New York loft effect by painting all the window frames dark brown.

Formed by turning four adjoining flats into a single living space, this north London conversion is filled with its owners’ impressive collection of art. A restrained, modern interior has been created by Tom Bartlett from Waldo works. The light is ‘Heracleum’ by Moooi. Tom suggested wallpapering a screen to stand behind the bed, rather than the wall, to add visual interest.

Floorboards of Baltic pine were laid throughout the first floor of Robin Muir’s house designed by Caroline Holdaway, including this spare bedroom. The room’s vibrant features include a black-and-white striped rug and The Rug Company’s Vivienne Westwood cushion. Similar tongue-and-groove panelling to that on the walls is available from The English Panelling Company.

For a girly look, choose heart bedding and pretty curtains to match. A pink table lamp continues the theme, while furniture in a light-coloured wood is more subtle and won?t overpower the girly furnishings and colour scheme.

A gothic grey palette is perfect for displaying quirky personal mementos and interesting artwork. For a look that’s dramatic instead of drab, include a variety of textures and interesting details. The bronze fixtures on the black iron bed are a perfect example.

The blind and headboard have been made in a matching fabric – a cost-effective trick for adding a punch of pattern to a bedroom. The blind is prettily trimmed in Samuel & Sons pom-poms. A window sill has been turned in to a reading nook with a padded cushion.

I have chosen this image because, as a Mum of 3-year-old boy and girl twins, this is such a great example of how to style a shared bedroom. Not only do the colours complement each other so well, but the room looks matched, even though it is for both sexes. The shelving is perfect for storing toys and books, and they can accessorize it with their own items. I am drawn to the simplicity of the design, and contemporary style especially as we now live in a modern new build home. My tips for styling a twins’ shared room is to keep it simple, use colour schemes that complement each other and involve the children in the process – as they usually like to have a say in what they prefer! Image Credit

Windows in tween rooms are a great opportunity to experiment with design elements which may be considered too bold or risky for common areas of a home such as living rooms or entryways. Consider large-scale patterns in neutral colors such as black, white and gray. Should a tween girl grow tired of her wall color and decide to change the paint, the window coverings will most likely work well with the updated palette.

Artfully display classic toys to soften the look of a neutral room and add soft furnishings such as small armchairs to delineate a play space. Create useful additional storage by adding shelves to a redundant fireplace.

This bed in the bedroom of gilder Clare Mosley and husband Mark Bicknell was bought in Paris. Its journey hasn’t been smooth. During the eight months it took to make the house reasonably habitable, Clare and Mark camped in one room and the builders worked around them. However, even this safeguard did not protect them from a few of the traditional building disasters. Having gone away for two days, they returned to find that the bed had been cut up and thrown out of the window and into a waiting skip below. Thankfully, it was saved. It is now resplendent with matching quilt, half-tester and cushions in ‘Mikado L2804’ by Le Manach.

This lovely – but tiny – home was once a library. Now it’s a testament to good use of small space, thanks to the designers at The Works. Notice the built-in cabinets and the recessed, upholstered “headboard” nook. Beautiful and genius.

When was time for our toddler to upgrade to his “Big Boy Bedroom” I knew I wanted to design something which would be able to grow with him over the years. The basis of the room is classic stars and stripes, which means we can mix up the accessories as his tastes change. Taking inspiration from our travels around America and their comic book stores we used bright red as an accent colour against greys and whites. Comic covers from our special dates; birthdays, anniversaries etc. hang on the walls next to handmade comic book bunting, framed posters and Superhero silhouettes, with lighting and canopies creating a cosy feel. Super storage solutions hide all manner of clutter and provide a great display area for favourite toys and books.

This bedroom in the Tudor wing of Bradwell Lodge – the perfect neoclassical country house in miniature – is decorated with ‘Regent’ wallpaper and matching blinds from Bernard Thorp. The scheme may be sweet and soothing but the room is allegedly haunted.

Well, my sister and I have been sharing bedrooms at two different homes for almost eleven years now, and my mom and stepdad are getting ready to build onto our house, which will give me my own room, of course my sister will bw gwtting a room with a door, a small closet, and one window, while I will be left with our ‘master bedroom’ so I’ll have the bathroom, a wlk in closet, and a two windows, i really want a new, cool design with pretty colors, i’de prefer no pink and purple, and a queen sized bed, though these are all wonderful ideas, my friends don’t have rooms this big, and my ceilings arent that high…do you have any ideas that might fit my room??

For grown-ups a bedroom is a place of tranquillity and calm. But do young children have the same needs? A bedroom is their space – a chance to distill their rainbow coloured personality into a single (usually fairly small) room. And children come with a lot of stuff – which usually means they’re living in the aftermath of a tornado of toys. Organisation is key – it’s all about creating order from the chaos without becoming a control freak. Which is why I love bedrooms with clever, inventive storage. The trick is to balance your desire for organisation with plenty of bright, colourful, child-friendly fun. Beds with built-in storage, slim-line desks and bookshelves are all great ways to use every scrap of space as efficiently as possible. The clever furniture and pops of colour in this photo are neat enough to please the grown-ups whilst still being perfect for the kids. Image Credit

A peppy palette of pinks and yellow-base greens is playful, but it also transitions from a toddler room idea to teen decor. The mix of patterns knows no age barrier and provides plenty of other color options for makeovers later on. For example, the soft sage or fuchsia in the bedding could easily translate into a wall color, and the room would still sport a cohesive design.

Like many a family home, there are conflicting tastes present in the home of Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada, furniture designers and owners of Casamidy. For starters, the two prefer different materials – Anne-Marie likes metal, while Jorge loves leather – but the two have created a home with a uniformity of spirit while still reflecting their personal tastes. In the master bedroom, the hand forged iron ‘Diego bed’ by Anne-Marie takes centre-stage.

Colour and pattern both enliven and define this family home. The graphic red and white Vivienne Westwood wallpaper in the nursery is far more diverting than any mobile. ‘Small children seem absolutely riveted by it,’ says the home’s owner, interior designer Bunny Turner of Turner Pocock.

‘My client’s bedroom is on the first floor, in what originally would have been the grand drawing room. The windows are lovely and big; they are the key to its appeal. I like the architecture to do the talking, so rather than obscure the windows with curtains, I’ve added plain bottom-up blinds. I have a weekness for pink, so I enjoyed including my client’s artwork… But neon is my favourite, hence the tube light from Mr Resistor,’ explains designer Harriet Anstruther of her client’s home in Chelsea, London.

These are some really great designs for anyone with smaller bedrooms! A lot of people choose to go with less or smaller furniture, in order to maximize floor space. But I’ve always preferred some of the ideas put forward here, like full-wall shelving and other ways to maximize space.

The main bedroom and en suite in this barn conversion in Kent follows a calm-inducing minimalist scheme. The walls of both rooms have been painted with Little Greene’s ‘French Grey Pale’. Rustic touches such as the cow skin rug, wooden stool and exposed brick wall add textural interest to the overall look.

Prior to this tween girl’s bedroom redesign, the walls were covered in bright lilac paint, which gave it more of a little girl’s identity. In order to make it cool enough for a tween yet classic enough for parents, the space would be painted a dark shade of violet, the dated wall-to-wall carpet would be replaced with gray-toned vinyl plank flooring and the childish furniture would be swapped out for colorful vintage pieces.

By opting for classic furniture and white walls as a base, this space and its contents will easily morph in to a spare bedroom with a change of bed. The vintage fabric used for the blind is from The Lacquer Chest in Kensington.

A favorite poem becomes art in this little girl’s room. And you don’t have to be an artist to create your own word art. Look for stencils and wall decals at crafts stores and online. Make sure the color of the lettering contrasts with the wall color to ensure your message will read loud and clear.

Ensure it’s spring all year around with a fresh, zesty green colour scheme. Don’t be fearful of combining patterns and prints in the same colour but this is best applied in smaller touches – one feature wall, one piece of furniture and textiles added to a neutral base.

Tongue-and-groove panelling adds New England-style charm to the spare room (in what used to be the butler’s pantry) of this 1830s London house restored to its original style by interior designer Max Rollitt. The touch of a chair used in place of a traditional nightstand is particularly charming.

In this country house in Norfolk with interiors designed by Veere Grenney, the Tudor wing is a glorious honeycomb of rooms for the youngest members of the family, where there are enough small beds for the most riotous of sleepovers. Four-poster beds, working fireplaces and generous armchairs make them gloriously comfortable, but the light colour palette, the brightly coloured modern rugs and the carefully chosen pictures and objects dispel any notion of stuffiness. Yellow is a great colour choice for childrens rooms: it’s bright, playful and most importantly gender neutral.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *