bedroom designs for teenage girls modern withcolors of blue grey and black _girls bedroom decor pink and green

This bed in the bedroom of gilder Clare Mosley and husband Mark Bicknell was bought in Paris. Its journey hasn’t been smooth. During the eight months it took to make the house reasonably habitable, Clare and Mark camped in one room and the builders worked around them. However, even this safeguard did not protect them from a few of the traditional building disasters. Having gone away for two days, they returned to find that the bed had been cut up and thrown out of the window and into a waiting skip below. Thankfully, it was saved. It is now resplendent with matching quilt, half-tester and cushions in ‘Mikado L2804’ by Le Manach.

Or, opt for a hollywood-style frame that supports the bottom of the bed and extends no further than the perimeter of the mattress. You can decorate the space above the bed with art, or add a headboard later.

The main bedroom in the Florescu’s modern Chelsea home follows a fresh decoration scheme – mainly white with touches of rich turquoise and sunny yellow. Through the door is a glimpse into Lizzie’s study – a studious sanctury with fitted bookshelves and a cosy armchair.

Floorboards of Baltic pine were laid throughout the first floor of Robin Muir’s house designed by Caroline Holdaway, including this spare bedroom. The room’s vibrant features include a black-and-white striped rug and The Rug Company’s Vivienne Westwood cushion. Similar tongue-and-groove panelling to that on the walls is available from The English Panelling Company.

Multipurposing will help a tween get much more use out of her room. To create a tween-height gathering area, consider using a coffee table in the center of the bedroom. Once guests come over, the low stature of the coffee table makes it the perfect spot to pull up a pillow and snack while playing games or reading books.

Designer Paolo Moschino commissioned painter Dawn Reader to create the stripes on the walls here. She custom-mixed the blue to match Paolo Moschino for Nicholas Haslam’s ‘Melba Stripe’ fabric in the blue on ecru colourway, but Edward Bulmer’s ‘Fair Blue’ natural paint is similar; £41.50 for a 2.5-litre pot of emulsion.

Just because your space is small does not mean your pieces can’t be large. Use a monochromatic color scheme because it creates an illusion for the eyes. Choose one color family and select variations of it for the largest parts of your rooms. Natural light will also be your friend. Use sheer window treatments or leave them off entirely. Consider furnishings that have multiple purposes. And always, create a space you love!

A twin attic bedroom has cosy bedding in Emma Burns’ former stables that she has converted into a weekend retreat. She has put into practice the principles that now guide her professional work as a designer at Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler.

WALLS ‘Messel’, £42 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Mylands. FURNITURE ‘French Modernist’ steel daybed, by Raphaël, £11,000, from Rose Uniacke. ‘Trio’ brass and walnut side table, by Neri & Hu for De La Espada, £1,104, from Heal’s. ACCESSORIES Mattress cover in ‘Grandvilliers’ (olive), by Nicole Fabre Designs, cotton/linen, £69 a metre, from Tissus d’Hélène. ‘Ticking Stripe’ cotton pillowcase (ecru/light grey), £19, from Toast. Bolster in ‘Iznik Vine’ (brown/black), by Martyn Lawrence Bullard, linen, £226 a metre, from Tissus d’Hélène. Eiderdowns in, from top: ‘Coral’ (chestnut), cotton, £58 a metre, from Soane; ‘Paola’ (gold), by Brigitte Singh, cotton, £58 a metre, from Aleta. Porcelain ‘Water Jug’ used as vase (steel), £106, from Mud with reconciling twenty-first century living with the Victorian proportions of the terrace house, the interior designer reconfigured the ground floor and linked the spaces with modern textures and pristine finishes.

Resisting the idea of moving or expanding into the basement, the owners of this London house from the 1850s gave architect Maria Speake of Retrouvius the go-ahead to make structural changes to give their family and business the space needed. This children’s bedrooms is flooded with light from both the window and skylight, with neat underbed storage to make the most of the awkward attic space.

Many parents agree that the creation of a place for a child, where he would be interested to learn, play, develop and grow, is a very important task. The environment of children has a huge impact on how they grow and develop, so parents are always trying to make a room for their children comfortable and fun as much as possible. Creative Ideas for Kids Rooms

My favourite bedroom has got to be my own. First of all, our ‘Breaking Bad’ style crocheted throw. Doug and I got completely addicted to this piece of TV genius and are convinced it is going to seriously influence Interior Trends for the next decade – the architecture in Albuquerque is so nice: slightly Mexican with a modern ‘edge’. The artwork above the bed is by my husband, Douglas. His work is our pension. The 1980’s style TV in the corner is a reassuring presence, as is the retro gas fire – all perfect for our unique, one off 1970’s house. The wire shelving racks are the perfect place to put books, phones and our industrial style inspection lamps. Image credit

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *