ebay broyhill girls canopy bedroom furniture buttermilk finish |idea girls

While it’s generally true that oversize furniture doesn’t work in a small room, there are always exceptions. For example, the canopy bed here is nearly as large as the tiny bedroom, but instead of cramped, the space looks perfect. The secret is in the clean, simple lines of the bed, along with its color – white – matching the walls to eliminate contrast.

I have a thing about exposed brickwork in the home. Along with floorboards it gives a raw feeling. Love it. This lofty bedroom is light and airy and the sporadically placed furniture makes it a little quirky. The white palette gives a sense of tranquillity and the addition of some playful colours makes it homely and inviting too. Image credit

Tasked with reinventing a conservative Park Avenue apartment, New York-based designer Sandra Nunnerley has created a modern, relaxed space that has an aura of calm. In the main bedroom, the headboard is in Holland & Sherry ‘Spectator’ fabric, with Mike and Doug Starn’s ‘Structure of Thought’ print hung above it; the doorway to the left leads seemlessly through to a dressing room to leave the main room uncluttered. Sandra describes the result as ‘timeless luxury and refinement’, without sacrificing a sense of modernity.

When it comes to bedroom furniture essentials, you will need a bedside table or nightstand (two if you are sharing your bedroom), a dressing table, a full-length mirror, and clothes storage in the form of a wardrobe, chest of drawers or both. If you have the space, a bedroom chair or end-of-bed bench is an added bonus, giving you somewhere to drape clothes or sit while you’re putting on your socks and shoes.

This open-plan bedroom designed by Suzy Hoodless and architect Johnny Holland of Hackett Holland, is the stuff of dreams. Wide-plank oak floorboards and geometric tiles create a division between the bedroom and a bathroom area with a free-standing ‘Vieques’ bath from Agape. Brass strips edge the fabric-fronted wardrobe wall. Graphic curtains made with fabric from Madeline Weinrib add colour to the white walls by the bed. See the rest of the house here.

Teenage girls’ bedroom decor should be different from a little girl’s bedroom. Designs for teenage girls’ bedrooms should reflect her maturing tastes and style with a youthful yet more sophisticated look and need to be very stylish, modern, fashionable and vibrant with energy. If it is possible, you can get your teenager involved in the decorating process. Your teen’s room will be her sanctuary, and should be designed with her best interests in mind. Here we have some greate inspirations for your reference!

Deputy decoration director Ruth Sleightholme combines a mid-century English colour palette with Grecian-inspired artwork and furniture to create calm and inviting schemes with quirky details that catch the eye.

In a bedroom at Cadland House in Hampshire, twin beds have block-printed quilts from India with deep yellows and blues pairing for a tasteful pop of colour. Yellow stripes are the backdrop to a gallery wall of artwork which also adds colour to the brown furnished room.

A gorgeous pale pink and grey colour scheme and the sweetest textiles. We’ll also be stealing the idea of the bird foot prints, which run across the floor and bed, up the wall and out the window: perfect for sparking a child’s imagination.

The bedroom is a place when you should be able to relax, rest and sleep well. The space therefore should be simple, clean and uncluttered. Ban all the unnecessary items and focus on the essentials – comfy pillows, soft bedding, good light for reading, and small bedside table to keep your books and water carafe. Create a space where you can rest your eyes and calm your mind, and it means white walls and no busy patterns. I am drawn to this bedroom because of the colour palette – all in soft brown tones. There is a feeling of calm and the crumpled linen looks very inviting. The only decoration it needs is a single artwork on the wall. The beauty here is in simplicity. Image credit

This is a cute and colourful girl’s room with a nice and comfortable bunk bed. The floral wall paper is beautiful charging the room with positivity. The heart-shaped mirror and the lamp on the side table looks wonderful.

Tween girls are known for taking a major interest in fashion. Play up the runway by using fashion fabrics for her room’s upholstery. While this pair of Louis armchairs is upholstered in violet velvet, it’s made fresh with pillows sewn from women’s dress fabric in a flame-stitch pattern.

But you can create a dedicated dressing area in a small bedroom, too. Use a decorative dressing screen to separate off one corner of the room, keeping a clothes rail behind it, as well as your dressing table if space allows.

Sugar and spice and all things nice, that’s what little girls are made of… So a cacophony of florals, butterflies and birds really works. Particularly when more traditional prints, like the wallpaper here, are combined with more modern ones.

personally i think they should be more realistic about the room sizes most kids dont have a room the size of these. and i personally dont like have of these rooms they look to grown up or kinda kidish.

The main bedroom in this Belgravia house is decorated with a sophisticated mix of geometric patterns, brass finishes and decorative bits and bobs. The focus is on the details in this room, including a geometric cushion by Jan Showers and a Ralph Lauren bedside lamp.

Just because your space is small does not mean your pieces can’t be large. Use a monochromatic color scheme because it creates an illusion for the eyes. Choose one color family and select variations of it for the largest parts of your rooms. Natural light will also be your friend. Use sheer window treatments or leave them off entirely. Consider furnishings that have multiple purposes. And always, create a space you love!

Give your daughter the royal treatment with a canopied four poster, and pick up on her interests, if she’s a music lover work in the theme (just don’t overkill it as kids can be notoriously prone to changing their minds!).

The owners of this west London house employed a skilled team to restore and complement its original features, and create a home with a feeling of permanence after a lifetime of moving. The house is a tall, mid-nineteenth-century white stucco building that they wanted to work well for twenty-first-century family life. ‘We were determined to avoid beige banker chic,’ the owner explains. A portrait by Betsy Podlach above the Howe fireplace inspired the palette for the main bedroom.

A bank of windows frames a pretty picket-fence bed. Surrounded by colorful curtains, the bed is the room’s focal point. Sunlight streams in to illuminate the space, but heavy curtains can be drawn to block out the light for nap time. Although a double bed might look oversized now, it will accommodate a growing child in later years, making it a strategic long-term investment.

Unless you have a budget that permits new furniture every few years, you’ll want to choose a bedroom set that grows up with your daughter. The room shown here is delightful now — what young girl wouldn’t love all the polka dots and the wonderful dog poster?  — but the basic white furniture will have no problem handling a more mature palette, bedding, and accessories when the teen years arrive.

‘I wanted the house to be comfortable above all, and for me colour is very much part of that,’ says Jacquie Rufus-Isaacs of her eighteenth-century farmhouse in the Cotswolds. With the help of her friend, decorator Scott Maddux, she has enhanced the house with a slightly unusual palette, which is no surprise as Jacquie’s real love is painting. She has a studio in a converted farm building where she works on her vibrant, expressive still lifes. Furnishings are equally various and include a sofa is upholstered in a Lelièvre stripe in the main bedroom, inherited antiques, junk-shop finds and a selection of paintings. These range from eighteenth-century landscapes to works by living artists including Barbara Stuart and Ken Howard. Jacquie’s eye ensures a harmonious composition.

Girls bedroom ideas, like these, reflect to a mother’s imagination. This is a traditional bedroom, done up predominantly in pink colour, generally associated with girls. The hearts on the wall paper and the curtains leave my heart fluttering. Again the pillow cover and the window treatment have been streamlined and is looking beautiful.

Thanks to a bold color scheme of violet, black, white and gold, this designer-caliber tween girl’s room is as appealing to the tween herself as it is to her young parents. From the royal palette to the vintage pieces and fashion-inspired fabrics, everything in the room can transition well as the tween girl becomes a full-fledged teenager. To invest wisely with tween room updates, emphasize color and pattern instead of themes.

Ok, so…I have a small room. How many teenagers do YOU know that has these gigantic elegant hardcore expensive rooms??!! I know NO ONE who has a giant room. My living room is like the size of some of these rooms. Be REALISTIC.

Create a simple canopy without a four-poster. Measure a piece of fabric to suspend over the length and width of bed. Sew (or use fusible web) side panels along the corners of the fabric. Suspend over the corners of the bed with hooks screwed into the ceiling.

Designer Hugh Leslie has not only created a simply chic scheme of primary colours and graphic prints, but a cosy wrap around headboard ensures there’ll be no danger of little ones going bump in the night.

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