bedroom mirrors for girls +trashed girls bedroom

There can be few House & Garden readers who are unfamiliar with the cult names and sought-after colours of the Farrow & Ball paint chart. Friends and business partners Martin Ephson and Tom Helme, the men responsible for planting it firmly in the nation’s consciousness, sold the company in 2006, and have since launched textiles company Fermoie. House & Garden decoration editor Gabby Deeming created a pretty scheme using their fabrics. The padded headboard, upholstered in the ‘Rabanna’ cotton is from Fafio, while the sofa and chair are both from Howe.

Gabby Deeming has created the atmosphere of a New England-style holiday home with painted wood and faded stripes. The walls are in ‘Faded Damask’ by Mulberry Home, while the bespoke wooden headboard can be made to order by Fafio, and is painted (along with all the rest of the wood work) in ‘Sea Cliff’ eggshell from Sanderson. The bedding is from Romo, and the driftwood side table is Oka.

Keeping the walls white in a girl’s bedroom will give you more decorating flexibility, which will help keep up with her constantly changing style. Have fun mixing and matching: Combine pink and red and introduce graphic prints and florals.

One of the most popular color schemes for a preteen girl’s bedroom is pink, white, and black. Take one look at the room shown here and you’ll see why: it’s the perfect blend of sophistication, innocence, and quirkiness. Stick with black and white on the flooring and the furniture, and you can easily change the theme if your daughter eventually decides she’s too old for pink.  

This sweet daybed, with its heavenly canopy and pretty metallic wall stickers, makes for the perfect girls’ bedroom retreat for reading, napping or simply daydreaming. Dusty lilac walls and the lack of clutter also has a calming effect.

Bright curtains add colour to the otherwise neutral main bedroom in the Virginia home of artist Anne Massie. The fabric is Penny Morrison’s bold ‘Haveli’ linen, custom dyed Annie’s favourite shade of pink.

We don’t need to tell you how quickly your children grow up, so thinking ahead with a room scheme will avoid continuous decorating overhauls. A simple scheme with easily removable touches, like this fantastic race track wallsticker mean the bedroom can easily grow with your child.

A gauzy, ceiling-hung canopy is a nice touch to a girl’s bedroom decor. Not only does it give this twin bed princesslike appeal, it also adds interesting height to the corner of the room. Simple, casual furnishings in neutral hues allow your little girl’s decorating style to change easily as she grows. Clever storage space below the bed make clean-up after play time a breeze and teach her the values of organization. 

A modern bedside table and monochromatic rug designed by Studio Ashby feature in the guest bedroom in a flat that has been transformed from a stark new-build to a characterful home. The pattern on the padded headboard is reflected in the artwork above the bed.

If you’re lucky enough to have an original fireplace in the room, make a feature (and storage solution) out of it by filling it with soft toys. We love how they look like they’ve tumbled down the chimney. Of course the feature wood wallpaper, pretty wall print and quirky accessories on the mantlepiece up the style factor too.

After visiting her friend Kathryn Ireland in France’s Tarn region, Anne Halsey bought a French farmhouse retreat there and enlisted the help of the decorator to create a relaxed space perfect for entertaining. This double guest room mixes different colours while sticking to the same gingham pattern (see the lamp shade, blanket and padded headboard), making for a colourful, chic and coordinated space.

Two headboards? Why not? We love the idea of reusing some reclaimed wood to make a headboard (see how to make one out of old doors here) and then placing another headboard in a different material in front of it (this one is from Zara Home). Very original.

ACCESSORIES Linen pillowcases (salmon), £48 each; linen duvet cover (stone), £297 for king-size; both from Larusi. Cushions, from top of pile: ‘Concrete Strip’, by Anna Glover, linen, 30 x 50cm, £115, and 40 x 60cm, £175, from Mint. ‘Leo’ (indigo), linen, £177.60 metre, from Pierre Frey. Hand-dyed cotton throw, by Joanna Louca, £460, from Mint. Refurbished Fifties desk lamp, ‘1227’, by Anglepoise, £450, from Howe. Porcelain bowl (yellow), by Mud Australia, £95, at Designers Guild. Fabric (under plant stand), ‘Tuileries’ (crème), by Verel de Belval, linen/polyester, £238 a metre, from Abbott & Boyd. Resin bowl (on plant stand), ‘Black & Snow Swirl’, £225, from Dinosaur Designs. Earthenware jugs, ‘Indigo Storm’, by Faye Toogood for 1882, £29.95 each, from Holly’s House.

‘I got it off Ebay for £200’ says designer Diana Sieff of the four-poster bed in the bedroom of her Oxfordshire home. ‘I like using big furniture in small spaces, because it gives the illusion that the room is bigger. Although I did have to take the finials off the bed posts, as they hit the ceiling.’ One of Diana’s trademarks is to forego curtains in favour of shutters. ‘I had them made,’ she explains, ‘which I prefer because they are minimal and less light-excluding.’ The walls are covered in – ‘Adams Eden’ by Lewis & Wood.

A room fit for a princess doesn’t have to purely consist of soft pinks. We love the addition of a fiery orange wall and red, orange and purple rug; the clashing hues of which add character to the scheme.

A pink floral bedroom makes an elegant scheme in this neoclassical pavilion Bradwell Lodge. It is aptly named the ‘Pink Room’. A bold Bernard Thorp ‘Brimble’ fabric has been used on the walls, bed and blind, adding character and playfulness. The curtain over the bed adds height, and gives the room a cosy den-like feel. Designed as a guest room, we think the ideas could easily be transferred to a child’s bedroom.

Henri Fitzwilliam-Lay, the owner of this Victorian country house in Shropshire has enhanced the interiors of this grand property with her signature mid-century aesthetic without compromising original features. This bedroom features panels of tropical Pierre Frey wallpaper and a matching tropical-themed lampshade. Plain bedding allows the leopard print headboard to take centre stage.

If we were to have a house in the Hamptons this is how we imagine it would be decorated, but let’s face it, the combination of wall cladding, print bedding and a picture wall of pretty illustrations would look good anywhere.

The bedroom of designer Kim Wilkie’s London flat features a bed from Heal’s and two sash windows, which allow light to pour into the room. The artichoke artwork above the bed (from the Hortus Eystettensis codex) highlights the green of the bed cover.

This bedroom in the Tudor wing of Bradwell Lodge – the perfect neoclassical country house in miniature – is decorated with ‘Regent’ wallpaper and matching blinds from Bernard Thorp. The scheme may be sweet and soothing but the room is allegedly haunted.

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